Sociology and Anthropology

College of Liberal Arts

 

Chair Shelley Smith

 

Web www.uta.edu/sociology-anthropology/

Email sociology@uta.edu

Phone 817.272.2661

Fax 817.272.3759

 

430 University Hall

Degrees / Certificates

Master’s Degrees

Anthropology, M.A.

Sociology, M.A. Non Thesis

Sociology, M.A. Thesis

Sociology, M.A. Thesis Substitute

Graduate Faculty

Professor

Ben Agger

Beth Anne Shelton

Shelley Smith

Robert Young

Associate Professor

Susan Baker

Dana Dunn

Heather Jacobson

Robert Kunovich

Linda Rouse

Christian Zlolniski

Assistant Professor

Krystal Beamon

Naomi Cleghorn

Chunping Han

Ritu Khanduri

Jason Shelton

Amy Speier

Professor Emeritus

Joseph Bastien

Raymond Eve

Lecturer

Josephine Ryan

Graduate Advisors

Heather Jacobson

Sociology, M.A. Thesis

Josephine Ryan

Anthropology, M.A.

Department Information

Courses

 

Department Information

Objectives: M.A. in Sociology

Admissions Requirements: Sociology

Fast Track Program in Sociology

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships in Sociology

Degree Requirements: Sociology

Objectives: M.A. in Anthropology

Admissions Requirements: Anthropology (Program Closed for Admission)

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships in Anthropology

Degree Requirements: Anthropology

Archaeological Fieldwork

 

Objectives: M.A. in Sociology

The Master of Arts program in sociology is designed to provide students with a firm substantive background in sociological theory and in the techniques of contemporary research methodology and statistical analyses. In addition to these core concerns, the program offers a variety of seminars, as well as practicum opportunities, to help prepare students for a wide range of professional careers in both the private and public sectors or continued graduate education at the Ph.D. level.

 

Admissions Requirements: Sociology

Applicants must apply for admission through, and supply all information required by, the Graduate School. The Sociology Graduate Advisor, in consultation with other members of the faculty, decides on each applicant.

All of the following criteria will be considered in determining program admission status:

  1. Undergraduate grade point average
  2. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores
  3. Letters of recommendation from faculty
  4. Preparation in sociology and satisfactory performance in sociology courses and/or courses in related disciplines
  5. A statement (2-3 pages) describing the applicant’s academic background, research/study interests, and professional goals

Criteria for Unconditional Admission

For unconditional admission, the student must satisfy each of the following criteria.

  1. Minimum GPA of 3.0, as calculated by the Graduate School.
  2. Preferred GRE score of at least 150 on the verbal subtest ( 500 on the prior scale) and 144 on the quantitative subtest (500 on the prior scale).
  3. Satisfactory letters of recommendation.
  4. Adequate preparation in sociology and satisfactory performance in sociology courses and/or those in related disciplines.
  5. Satisfactory statement (2-3 pages) describing the applicant’s academic background, research/study interests, and professional goals

Criteria for Probationary Admission

Students who do not qualify for unconditional admission may be admitted on probation if they satisfy any 4 of the 5 criteria for unconditional admission.

Those entering the program under probationary status will be granted unconditional admission only after completing 12 hours of graduate sociology courses, approved by the Graduate Advisor, earning no grade below a B.

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required information prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements may be granted provisional admission.

Deferred Admission

A deferred decision may be granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.

Denied Admission

Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for any of the aforementioned forms of admission will not be admitted.

International Students

To qualify for admission, international students must score 550 or above on the TOEFL.

Sociology students who completed their undergraduate degree in Sociology at UT Arlington with a 3.0 overall GPA, a 3.0 GPA in advanced hours, a B or better in Sociological Theory (SOCI 3372 or 4311), Social Statistics (SOCI 3352) and Social Research (SOCI 3305 or 3462), and satisfactory letters of recommendation from UT Arlington faculty qualify for automatic unconditional admission, pending submission of all required materials.

 

Fast Track Program in Sociology

The Fast Track Program allows outstanding undergraduate students in sociology at UT Arlington to take up to three graduate seminars in sociology that will earn credit toward both the Bachelor’s degree and the Master’s degree in Sociology. It is designed to encourage high standards of performance, to facilitate the transition from undergraduate to graduate study, and to reduce time needed to complete the MA . Interested undergraduate students should apply for the Fast Track Program when they are within 30 hours of completing the Bachelor’s degree. To qualify, students must have completed at least 30 hours at UTA with a GPA of 3.0 in all courses and 3.25 in the last 30 hours. Before entering the Fast Track, students must also have completed the four required core courses in the Sociology major with a GPA of at least 3.5, or three of the four with a GPA of 3.66 or more. Additionally, they must have already taken at least two non-core sociology courses with a GPA of 3.5 or higher.

Students who successfully complete the Fast Track Program will be admitted automatically to the Graduate School to continue their graduate work in the Sociology MA Program once the Bachelor’s degree is awarded. They will not be required to take the GRE, complete an additional application for admission to the Graduate School, supply letters of recommendation, or pay an application fee. An undergraduate student completing the maximum of nine graduate hours would be admitted to the Sociology MA Program with only five additional courses and a thesis remaining to complete the requirements for the thesis option.

To remain in the Fast Track Program, students must receive no grade lower than a B in any graduate seminars taken as an undergraduate, selected with the advice and approval of the Sociology Graduate Advisor. Undergraduate students who do not maintain grades of B or A in the graduate courses taken will be unable to continue in the Fast Track Program but, if the courses are completed passing, will still receive credit toward their undergraduate degree requirements. Students originally denied entry into the Fast Track Program, discontinued after provisional admission, subsequently dropped or opting out are still welcome to apply to the Sociology MA Program in the usual way and will be considered without prejudice.

For an application form or to obtain more details about this program, contact the Sociology Graduate Advisor.

 

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships in Sociology

Graduate teaching and research assistantships and other forms of financial support will be awarded on a competitive basis. In addition to performance in any graduate courses the student may have taken, the same criteria used to determine admission status will be used in evaluating applications for such awards. No single factor, including standardized test scores, will be used to end consideration of any graduate assistantships.

 

Degree Requirements: Sociology

Students may select from three options: the thesis, thesis substitute, or non-thesis degree plan.

Thesis Option: Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 24 hours of coursework, including core courses in theory, methods, and statistics, plus the six hour thesis course (SOCI 5698).

Thesis Substitute Option: Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 30 hours of coursework, including core courses in theory, methods, and statistics, plus the three hour thesis substitute course (SOCI 5393).

Non-Thesis Option: Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 33 hours of coursework, including core courses in theory, methods, and statistics, plus the three hour non-thesis course (SOCI 5385).

All candidates for the degree Master of Arts with a major in sociology must pass a final examination. For thesis candidates, it is the oral defense of the completed thesis. For thesis substitute candidates, it is an oral examination on a project, the scope, content, and form of which shall be determined by the student’s supervising committee. A thesis substitute project might be, for example, a review of professional literature on a selected topic, a thematic paper integrating the course of study completed, or an internship report applying sociological concepts. For non-thesis candidates, it is an oral examination, the scope, content, and form of which shall be determined by the student’s supervising committee.

Dual Degree Program

Students in sociology may participate in a dual degree program where by they can earn a Master of Arts in Sociology and another field, such as Master of Public Administration or Master of Science in Social Work. By participating in a dual degree program, students can apply a number of semester hours jointly to meet the requirements of both degrees, thus reducing the total number of hours which would be required to earn both degrees separately. Six or more hours may be jointly applied depending on the total number of hours required for both degrees, and subject to the approval of graduate advisors from both programs.

To participate in the dual degree option, students must make separate application to each program and must submit a separate Program of Work for each program. Admission to and enrollment in the two programs must be concurrent (admitted to the second program before completing more than 24 hours in the first). Those interested should consult each of the appropriate graduate advisors for coursework requirements and refer to the Graduate School catalog entry on Dual Degree Program in the Advanced Degrees and Requirements section for further details.

 

Objectives: M.A. in Anthropology

The Anthropology M.A. program offers students a well-integrated curriculum in cultural anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology. It is intended both (1) for students who wish to prepare for admission to an anthropology Ph.D. program at another university, and (2) for those who wish to learn anthropological skills and perspectives to enhance their careers (in education, the helping professions, or other fields) in an increasingly diverse society.

Students may choose between a thesis option (30 credit hours), recommended for those planning to go on to a Ph.D. program, and a thesis substitute/internship option (36 credit hours, ordinarily including a three-hour practicum and ANTH 5370).

 

Admissions Requirements: Anthropology

Program currently is closed to admissions

 

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships in Anthropology

Graduate teaching and research assistantships and other forms of financial support will be awarded on competitive basis. No single factor will be used as the basis for these awards; rather candidates’ records will be evaluated in their entirety and support will be awarded to the best candidates based on the collective judgment of the Graduate Anthropology Faculty.

 

Degree Requirements: Anthropology

Thesis Option: Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours. Program must include 1) ANTH 5310; 2) ANTH 5351; 3) a 3 hour statistics course at either the graduate or undergraduate level, as specified by the student’s committee; 4) 6 hours of methods (including ANTH 5315 or ANTH 5320, and ANTH 5325 or ANTH 5363; 5) 6 hours of thesis.

Thesis Substitute/Internship Option: Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours. Program must include 1-4 above, ANTH 5370, and ANTH 5371.

 

Archaeological Fieldwork

All graduate students concentrating in archaeology are strongly encouraged to have participated in an archaeological field school (for academic credit) or to have obtained equivalent excavation, survey, and/or laboratory experience before graduation. Students seeking placement on archaeological field projects should contact the faculty for guidance and recommendations pertinent to their goals and interests.

 

ANTH Courses

ANTH5191 – CONFERENCE COURSE

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

ANTH5307 – FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  2 Lab Hours

Estimating age, sex, race, stature, pathology, cause of death, and time since death from human remains. The role of skeletal biology and physical anthropology in criminal investigation. Case studies will be used to demonstrate application of the methods studied. Requires enrollment in the undergraduate lab section.

 

ANTH5310 – HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course is a critical examination of major theoretical trends in ethnological theory, from mid-19th century to the present.

 

ANTH5315 – ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHODS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An examination of research methods and underlying theory in archaeology and their evolution since the era of European antiquarianism. Origins and development of archaeology as a scholarly discipline. Emphasis on the period 1960-present; consideration of recent trends in analysis and reportage.

 

ANTH5317 – ARCHAEOLOGY OF EXPLORATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Archaeological evidence for travel in antiquity. Technology of travel (horse/camel, wheeled vehicles, boats) and related topics (navigation; development of trade and trade routes; nature of discovery, settlement and colonization in antiquity). Case studies drawn from ancient cultures of the Old World from the Stone Age through Medieval times.

 

ANTH5320 – METHODS IN BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course covers several topical areas relevant to biological anthropologists specializing in human biology, including osteology and skeletal biology, skeletal maturation (both postcranial and craniofacial), growth and development from birth to biological maturity, and selected topics in forensics, anthropometry, physiology, nutrition, genetics, epidemiology, and demography.

 

ANTH5325 – QUALITATIVE METHODS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Students do fieldwork in anthropology. Students practice participant observation, conduct an interview, collect a kinship chart, map blocks, collect life histories and participate in rituals. Course emphasizes methods of data collection, analysis/interpretation of data, and critical writing.

 

ANTH5341 – POSTCOLONIAL SOUTH ASIA

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

It approaches the competing and complementary claims on postcolonial theory by mapping the intersections in historical anthropology, literary theory, and cultural analysis. More broadly it brings to focus the shifts from Marxist to Poststructuralist directions. Though the regional focus is on India, the endeavor is also to assess dialogues among varying strands of cultural perspectives and its impact in other postcolonial contexts, both within and beyond the South Asian subcontinent.

 

ANTH5342 – ADVANCED ETHNOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Seminar based on student reports and critiques of assigned readings. Major emphasis on the areas of ethnology and social anthropology.

 

ANTH5344 – CULTURES OF LATIN AMERICA

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An ethnological comparison of societies and cultures in Central and South America. Emphasis on gender, ethnicity, and political economy.

 

ANTH5345 – RELIGION AND CULTURE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An ethnological comparison of native religions to understand non-western belief systems. Emphasis on rituals, myths, totemic systems, taboos, and cosmology.

 

ANTH5346 – MESOAMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An examination of the diversities of several prehistoric Mesoamerican cultures including the Olmec, Maya, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, and the Aztec. Current issues including the beginnings of agriculture, early village life, the rise of complexity and the institution of kingship, warfare, and Mesoamerican ideology and cosmology will be addressed.

 

ANTH5349 – TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

 

ANTH5351 – EMERGENCE OF HUMANKIND

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An intensive review of the evidence for, and main outlines of, human biological and cultural evolution up to agricultural origins.

 

ANTH5353 – MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An examination of anthropological concepts for understanding curing practices and attitudes toward health programs in various cultures.

 

ANTH5355 – HUNTERS AND GATHERERS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Cross-cultural approach to the ecological, social, and historical contexts of hunters, gatherers, and foragers.

 

ANTH5363 – ETHNOGRAPHY AND PERSONAL NARRATIVE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Focus is on anthropology and autobiography, autoethnography, life history, and narrative constructions of selfhood in different cultural contexts. Development of the life history approach in ethnographic research. Methods in the collections and analysis of life stories.

 

ANTH5365 – GLOBALIZATION AND INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Examines how the expansion of global capitalist economy has contributed to the growth of international migration around the world. Focuses on how transnational migration affects the economic, social, political, and cultural practices of immigrants in both their countries of origin and destination.

 

ANTH5369 – FOLKLORE AND MYTHOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Function, forms, and interpretation of folklore and myth in traditional societies; examination of oral literature as an expression of continuity and change; emphasis on a structural analysis of myth.

 

ANTH5370 – APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Examines the application of anthropological knowledge to solve practical problems in todayAs global world. We learn how anthropological concepts, methods, and insights are applied to understand and solve important problems related to economic development, health, environmental issues, immigration, international business, and others.

 

ANTH5371 – RESEARCH PRACTICUM / INTERNSHIP

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

ANTH5373 – ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL

0 Lecture Hours  ·  3 Lab Hours

This course, conducted during the summer sessions, consists of on-site and classroom instruction in techniques of archaeological survey, excavation, laboratory, processing, and analysis. Students can receive either three or six hours of credit. Enrollment by permission of instructor only. Prior coursework in anthropology desirable but not necessary.

 

ANTH5389 – TEACHING ANTHROPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

To learn strategies of coping with practical problems of teaching undergraduate anthropology, students confer with one or more professors to discuss preparing syllabi and lectures, constructing and evaluating examinations, etc. Not to be counted toward the degree requirement.

 

ANTH5392 – CONFERENCE COURSE IN ANTHROPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

ANTH5398 – THESIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

ANTH5406 – HUMAN OSTEOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  2 Lab Hours

Detailed examination of human skeletal morphology. Topics include form and function of all skeletal elements in the human body, differentiation of each bone, left and right side identification, identification of fragmented remains, and muscle attachments and articulations. Content useful in forensic anthropology, archaeology, and hominid paleontology. If taken for undergraduate credit either as ANTH 4306 or ANTH 4406, cannot be repeated for graduate credit.

 

ANTH5673 – ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL

0 Lecture Hours  ·  6 Lab Hours

This course, conducted during the summer sessions, consists of on-site and classroom instruction in techniques of archaeological survey, excavation, laboratory, processing, and analysis. Students can receive either three or six hours of credit. Enrollment by permission of instructor only. Prior coursework in anthropology desirable but not necessary.

 

ANTH5698 – THESIS

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

SOCI Courses

SOCI5191 – CONFERENCE COURSE

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

SOCI5301 – SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A comprehensive review, analysis, and evaluation of the dominant conceptual perspectives, and their proponents, in sociological theory.

 

SOCI5303 – RESEARCH DESIGN

2 Lecture Hours  ·  2 Lab Hours

Seminar on the design, plan, structure, and strategies of contemporary social research. Examines the interrelationships of theory, methods, and statistics along with the problems of measurement, sampling, scaling techniques, and the presentation of statistical data.

 

SOCI5304 – SOCIAL STATISTICS I

2 Lecture Hours  ·  2 Lab Hours

Examines a variety of statistical methods including analysis of variance and covariance, multivariate regression models, multiple and partial correlations, factor analysis, and other contemporary parametric and nonparametric techniques. Emphasis is on the application of these methods to social science data.

 

SOCI5310 – SEMINARS IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction and discussion of theoretical and methodological perspectives in social psychology. Focusing on particular domains of social life, these seminars examine fundamental processes of social interaction and the influence of social situations and social experience on the thought, feeling, and behavior of individuals. (May be repeated for credit when topics vary.)

 

SOCI5319 – SEMINARS IN SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND CHANGE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Seminars in this area are concerned with the structure and change of the basic elements of society that represent ordered and regulated aspects of social life. Also examined are collective behavior and social movements which result from instability in institutional arrangements and represent efforts to enact social change. (May be repeated for credit when topics vary.)

 

SOCI5330 – SEMINARS IN SOCIAL DIFFERENTIATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

In all human societies, perceptions of differences in individuals, social positions and groups arise and form a basis for social evaluation. Seminars in this area examine the processes involved in social differentiation, social evaluation, and resulting forms of social inequality. (May be repeated for credit when topics vary).

 

SOCI5341 – SEMINARS IN THEORY AND RESEARCH METHODS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Research methods seminars address a variety of issues related to quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and analysis. Theory courses offer extended treatment of topics in theory and theory construction, reflecting systematic efforts to understand the nature and operation of human society and social behavior. (May be repeated for credit when topics vary.)

 

SOCI5385 – NON-THESIS PROJECT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The topic and scope of the written project must be approved by the three graduate faculty members who will serve on the final Supervising Committee. A final oral presentation of the project is required.

 

SOCI5388 – RESEARCH PRACTICUM / INTERNSHIP

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

SOCI5389 – TEACHING SOCIOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

To learn strategies of coping with practical problems of teaching undergraduate sociology, students assist one or more professors in lecture preparation, grading, and examination construction. Not to be counted toward the degree requirement.

 

SOCI5392 – CONFERENCE COURSE IN SOCIOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

There is not currently a description listed for this course since the content varies.

 

SOCI5393 – THESIS SUBSTITUTE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The topic and scope of the written project must be approved by the three graduate faculty members who will serve on the final Supervising Committee. A final oral presentation of the project is required.

 

SOCI5398 – THESIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

SOCI5698 – THESIS

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours