Linguistics

College of Liberal Arts

 

Chair Laurel Stvan

 

Web ling.uta.edu

Phone 817.272.3133

Fax 817.272.2731

 

P403 Hammond Hall

Degrees / Certificates

Master’s Degrees

Linguistics, M.A.

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, M.A.

Doctoral Degrees

Linguistics, B.A. to Ph.D.

Linguistics, Ph.D.

Certificates

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) – Gainful Employment Disclosure

Graduate Faculty

Professor

Colleen Fitzgerald

David Silva

Associate Professor

Laurel Stvan

Assistant Professor

Cynthia Kilpatrick

Joseph Sabbagh

Jeffrey Witzel

Professor Emeritus

Jerold Edmondson

Graduate Advisors

Cynthia Kilpatrick

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, M.A.

Joseph Sabbagh

Linguistics, M.A.

Jeffrey Witzel

Linguistics, Ph.D.

Department Information

Courses

 

Department Information

Objectives

Degree Requirements

Admission Requirements for Graduate Degree Programs in Linguistics

Special Admissions Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in TESOL

 

Objectives

Linguistics is the scientific study of language, investigating the systematic aspects of sound patterns, word formation, sentences, and meaning. The Department of Linguistics and TESOL at the University of Texas at Arlington provides training in both linguistics and TESOL. In terms of linguistics degrees, the Department trains students so that they can describe, analyze and apply theories to data representing the core areas of the field: phonology (sound patterns), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (meaning in context). Students receive a foundation that requires courses in theoretical phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics, but there are also opportunities to go build on these areas in terms of language documentation/field linguistics, corpus approaches, and experimental investigations. Many linguistics students pursue additional studies or doctoral concentrations in second language acquisition or work on an understudied or endangered language, areas in which Department faculty have considerable expertise. In terms of TESOL degrees, the programs cover relevant linguistic training, paired with courses in methodology and pedagogy, to equip graduates for professional careers in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL). The TESOL degree programs include practicum and internship components so that students learn the theories that underly the practice, but also receive ample opportunities to put those theories and skills into practice. Required course content includes second language acquisition, the phonological and grammatical structure of English, and curriculum design. There are also several courses where linguistics and TESOL students find their studies intersecting, such as in the second language acquisition or language revitalization courses, which can be used as electives or specialization courses in various degree programs.

The Ph.D. degree provides advanced training in field linguistics and documentary linguistics, in the primary areas of the field in sound, syntax, and meaning, as well as training in corpus linguistics, experimental techniques for investigating language and language documentation. Students will pursue and develop in-depth expertise in at least one area of specialization; see the Department of Linguistics website for possible doctoral specializations based on core faculty expertise.

For further information on graduate degree programs in Linguistics, consult the program’s Web site at http://ling.uta.edu/degrees or contact the Graduate Advisor.

 

Degree Requirements

Linguistics

Graduate programs in linguistics are primarily designed for those with a background in one or more foreign languages and/or a background in the linguistic aspects of the English language. A graduate career in linguistics may also be appropriate to those with undergraduate study in anthropology, psychology, philosophy, or religion. Applicants without formal training in linguistics are invited to apply, provided that they are prepared to meet the department’s requirements for leveling courses.

Requirements for master’s and doctoral degrees are given in the Advanced Degrees and Requirements section of this catalog. In addition, the following apply to those pursuing a graduate degree in linguistics:

All students pursing a graduate degree in linguistics must meet the degree prerequisites (i.e., leveling courses) and must take the core courses appropriate to their degree as published on the department’s Web site, http://ling.uta.edu/degrees.

Linguistics Degree Plans

M.A. Non-Thesis Degree Plan: 36 hours of graduate-level coursework plus comprehensive examination on the coursework. Students requiring leveling courses must take from three to to nine additional hours, for a total of up to 45 hours.

Ph.D. Degree Plan: Students entering the Ph.D. program (including those entering as doctoral-bound) must enter having the equivalent of LING 5300/3311, 3330, and 3340. The first semester of the program requires enrollment in LING 5320 and 5330. The doctoral degree requires graduate coursework as follows: 18 hours of linguistic core courses, 12 hours of methods courses, 3 hours of professional development, 6 hours in an area of specialization, 6 hours of seminar courses (separate from other requirements and with at least one in planned area of specialization), 3 hours of dissertation proposal preparation (LING 6391) and 9 hours of dissertation (LING 6999). Students entering with a M.A. in linguistics may be able to waive up to 15 hours, at the discretion of the department, for equivalent courses completed at a B or higher in their master’s program.

Theoretical core courses: LING 5320, LING 5321, LING 5330, LING 5331, LING 5345, LING 5347

Methods Courses: LING 5380, LING 5381, LING 6380, LING 6381 (or an approved course in research design or statistics offered by another department)

Professional Development Courses: LING 6300

Seminar requirement: All students must take 6 hours in seminars, using courses from the following list: LING 6390, LING 6392, LING 6393, LING 6394, LING 6395. Students should consult with their advisor in planning choices; at least one seminar must be in area of specialization.

BA-to-PH.D. students must successfully defend their dissertation proposal in order to be granted the M.A. degree in linguistics.

All Ph.D. students must demonstrate knowledge of core areas in linguistics by passing the diagnostic examination requirement outlined on the departmental website.

Doctoral students must satisfy all the coursework requirements of the doctoral program (including specializaton and seminar courses) prior to taking courses that do not fulfill the requirements. Any exception to this policy must be approved by a majority vote of the Graduate Studies Committee.

In addition, there are foreign language and professional activities requirements that must be met. Visit http://ling.uta.edu/degrees/phd-linguistics for details.

TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)

Graduate programs in TESOL are primarily designed for those with a background in English language and literature and/or education. A graduate career in TESOL may also be appropriate to those with undergraduate study in a foreign language, international studies, or community development.

Requirements for master’s degrees are given in the Advanced Degrees and Requirements section of this catalog. In addition, the following apply to those pursuing a graduate degree in TESOL:

TESOL Degree Plans

M.A. Non-Thesis Degree Plan: 36 hours of graduate-level coursework plus comprehensive examination on the coursework.

All M.A. TESOL students must demonstrate knowledge of a foreign language prior to unconditional admission to the degree program. Those without such background may pursue study of a foreign language at U.T. Arlington concurrent with probationary enrollment in the M.A. TESOL program.

For additional information on prerequisites or degree requirements, consult the Graduate Advisor.

Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

This program provides preparation through study and practice for the individual who wishes to teach English to speakers of other languages. It is available to any student who has been admitted to the Graduate School at U.T. Arlington.

The certificate requires 18 hours of course work: LING 5300, 5301, 5302, 5305, 5310, and 5303 or 5304. In addition to the course work, there is a practicum; this is done under LING 5110. LING 5300 (or equivalent linguistics course work) is a prerequisite for LING 5301, 5302, 5305, and 5310; LING 5301 is a prerequisite for 5303, and 5304. Even if the student presents an equivalency of LING 5300, 5301, and/or other course work, the 18-hour requirement must be met. A maximum of three credit hours of course work done at another institution can be transferred and counted toward the certificate.

Upon beginning study for the certificate, the student should contact the Graduate Advisor in TESOL to declare the intention to earn the certificate.

 

Admission Requirements for Graduate Degree Programs in Linguistics

For Admission Requirements for Fall 2010 semester and thereafter, see http://ling.uta.edu/documents/LINGTESOL-Admissions-Criteria-Effective-Fall-2009.pdf for a downloadable PDF.

In evaluating candidates for admissions to its graduate degree programs, the Linguistics & TESOL Faculty has adopted a comprehensive approach that is sensitive to the diversity of backgrounds of its applicants. To this end, the following constellation of quantitative and qualitative factors has been established to make explicit the range of criteria upon which admissions decisions will be based. These factors are then applied to the Admission Metrics established for each degree program. (See below for admission requirements for the Graduate Certificate in TESOL.)

Admission Factors

Admission decisions into a degree program in the Department of Linguistics & TESOL are made on the basis of two types of factors, quantitative and qualitative. PhD applicants must include an academic writing sample.

  1. Quantitative Factors
    1. Grade Point Average (GPA)
      1. For M.A. program applicants, undergraduate GPA is determined by the U.T. Arlington Graduate School.
      2. For Ph.D. program applicants, GPA is based on all graduate work completed and recorded at the time the applicant submits an application for admission.
      3. For BA-to-PhD applicants, GPA is on the undergraduate GPA as determined by the U.T. Arlington Graduate School.
    2. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Scores. All applicants are required to submit GRE scores. There are no exceptions. The Department of Linguistics & TESOL evaluates each applicant’s sub-scores separately: verbal, quantitative, and analytical.
    3. TOEFL Scores (international applications only) Applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted either an undergraduate or graduate degree by an English-medium institution must also present a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or IELTS equivalent score. There are no exceptions.
  2. Qualitative Factors
    1. Letters of Recommendation. Each applicant must present three (3) letters of recommendation that unequivocally indicate that the applicant is prepared for and capable of successful graduate study in linguistics or TESOL at U.T. Arlington. The letters should further indicate that the applicant is capable of completing the appropriate degree program.
    2. Statement of intent for academic study in our department. Each applicant must write a statement that explains their plan of study and specialization in our department. The statement will be evaluated on the degree to which it is clear, reasonable, and consistent with the research and teaching agenda of the current faculty in Linguistics & TESOL at U.T. Arlington. Prospective applicants should consider the departmental website and faculty research and teaching areas as they evaluate whether they would be able to accomplish their plan of study in our department, especially if they are applying to the doctoral program. Possible areas of specialization are those outlined at http://ling.uta.edu/degrees/phd-linguistics. The statement should also convey a level of commitment and maturity commensurate with the applicant’s desired degree goals.
    3. Undergraduate Preparation. Applicants to the M.A. in TESOL program should have passed the following three courses or reasonable equivalents as determined by the graduate advisor (U.T. Arlington equivalents are noted in parentheses):
      1. English composition (ENGL 1302)
      2. A course on English-language literature (ENGL 2319, ENGL 2329)
      3. The equivalent of a fourth-semester course in a foreign language (SPAN 2314, FREN 2314, etc.). Students whose undergraduate education was delivered in a language other than English are exempt from this requirement.
    4. Applicants to the M.A. in Linguistics or Ph.D. in Linguistics programs should have passed the following three courses or reasonable equivalents as determined by the graduate advisor (U.T. Arlington equivalents are noted as in parentheses):
      1. English composition (ENGL 1302)
      2. College-level mathematics (MATH 1302)
      3. A laboratory science (any 1000-level course in BIOL, CHEM, GEOL or PHYS; LING 5322 may also be used to fulfill this requirement)
    5. Applicants to the Ph.D. and the BA-to-Ph.D in Linguistics programs should present all of the following: evidence of research activity during undergraduate studies; an undergraduate transcript showing courswork which demonstrates that the applicant has passed with a B or higher the following three courses or reasonable equivalents as determined by the graduate advisor (U.T. Arlington equivalents are noted as in parentheses):
      1. Introduction to linguistics (LING 3311/LING 5300)
      2. Phonetics and phonology (LING 3330)
      3. Morphology and syntax (LING 3340)
    6. Previous Graduate Work (Ph.D. applicants only.) Ph.D. applicants must present at least 30 semester credit hours of previous graduate-level coursework in any field (not necessarily linguistics) and must meet the linguistics course equivalents (LING 3311/5300, LING 3330, LING 3340).
    7. Ph.D. applicants who present fewer than 30 semester credit hours will be assessed based on whether they meet the criteria for unconditional admission for the accelerated Ph.D. in linguistics, and whether their coursework includes the linguistics course equivalents (LING 3311/5300, LING 3330, LING 3340). Such candidates who meet the unconditional admission criterion and who also have passed the three linguistics course equivalents will be considered for the BA-to-PhD program (i.e., "doctoral-bound"). Ph.D. applicants who present fewer than 30 semester credit hours and do not meet the unconditional admission criterion AND also the criterion of passing the three linguistics course equivalents will automatically be considered as applicants to the M.A. Linguistics program.
    8. Writing Sample (required for PhD applicants, optional for other programs): Applicants must submit an academic writing sample (research paper) of 20 pages or less. The paper must be in an area of language or linguistic study, and demonstrate a strong prose style, a solid handle on argumentation, and the ability to do academic research in linguistics or a closely related field.

Admission Metrics

In formulating a recommendation for admission, the graduate advisors will apply the following admission metrics to each applicant’s admission dossier.

  1. M.A. in TESOL
    1. Unconditional Admission. Typically, applicants for the M.A. in TESOL will be offered unconditional admission if they meet either of the following two sets of criteria:
      1. The applicant presents an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0, a GRE Verbal score of at least 550 (156 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Quantitative score of at least 450 (141 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Analytical score of at least 4.5, and a full set of Qualitative Factors.. In addition, applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also present a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based.
      2. The applicant presents an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.5, a GRE Verbal score of at least 500 (153 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Quantitative score of at least 400 (140 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Analytical score of at least 4.0, and a full set of Qualitative Factors. In addition, applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by a English-medium institution must also present a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based.
    2. Probationary Admission. Applicants for the M.A. in TESOL typically present a complete application that has one of the following:
      1. includes a GRE Verbal score of less than 500 (153);; or
      2. includes a GRE Quantitative score of less than 400 (140); or
      3. includes a GRE Analytical score of less than 4.0; or
      4. lacks the undergraduate preparation specified above but who otherwise meet a majority of the remaining admission criteria (including an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0), will be eligible for probationary admission. Students on probation must:
        • complete any undergraduate courses necessary for unconditional admission during their first two semesters of study; and
        • achieve a GPA of at least 3.3 in the first 9 graduate-level courses taken as an M.A. TESOL student.
  2. M.A. in Linguistics
    1. Unconditional Admission. Typically, applicants for the M.A. in Linguistics will be offered unconditional admission if they meet either of the following sets of criteria:
      1. The applicant presents an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0, a GRE Verbal score of at least 450 (150 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Quantitative score of at least 550 (146 on the 2011 or later system), a GRE Analytical score of at least 4.5, and a full set of acceptable Qualitative Factors In addition, applicants for whom English in not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also present a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based.
      2. The applicant presents an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.5, a GRE Verbal score of at least 400 (146 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Quantitative score of at least 500 (144 on the 201a or later system), a GRE Analytical score of at least 4.0, and a full set of acceptable Qualitative Factors. In addition, applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also present a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based.
    2. Probationary Admission. Applicants for the M.A. in Linguistics typically present a complete application that has one of the following:
      1. includes a GRE Verbal score of less than 400 (146); or
      2. includes a GRE Quantitative score of less than 500 (144); or
      3. includes a GRE Analytical score of less than 4.0; or
      4. lacks the undergraduate preparation specified above, but who otherwise meet a majority of the remaining admission criteria (including an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0), will be eligible for probationary admission. Students on probation must:
        • complete any undergraduate courses necessary for unconditional admission during their first two semesters of study; and
        • achieve a GPA of at least 3.3 in the first 9 graduate-level credit hours (in LING courses) as an M.A. Linguistics student.
  3. BA-to-PhD applicants in Linguistics
    1. Unconditional admission. Typically, applicants for the BA-to-Ph.D. in Linguistics program must be admitted unconditionally. Unconditional admission requirements are as follows. The applicant presents an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.6 (on a 4.0 scale) based on upper division course work (junior and senior level or equivalent) in a four year BA in linguistics program or a BA or BS in an allied field. Regardless of degree program, the coursework must include courses equivalent to LING 3330 and LING 3340. In additon, the applicant presents a GRE Verbal score of at least 450, a GRE Quantitative score of at least 550, a GRE Analytical score of at least 4.0, and a full set of excellent Qualitative Factors. In addition, applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based(or its IELTS equivalent) and also submit a score from the Test of Spoken English, the Speaking Section of the TOEFL iBT, or the Speaking Section of the IELTS that documents the applicant’s proficiency in spoken English. The speaking score is used for making determination for assistantships; applicants who wish to be considered for an assistantship must receive a score of 45 or higher on the TSE, a score of 23 on the Speaking Setion of the TOEFL iBT, or a score of 7 on the Speaking Section of the IELTS. This and other requirements for holding an assistantship are described in the Graduate Assistantship/Associateship Policy.
  4. Ph.D. in Linguistics
    1. Unconditional Admission. Typically, applicants for the Ph.D. in Linguistics will be eligible for unconditional admission if they meet either of the following sets of criteria:
      1. The applicant presents a graduate GPA of at least 3.3, a GRE Verbal score of at least 500 (153 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Quantitative score of at least 600 (148 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Analytical score of at least 4.5, and a full set of excellent Qualitative Factors. In addition, applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also submit scores on the Speaking section of either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the IELTS.In addition, applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based (or its IELTS equivalent) and also submit a score from the Test of Spoken English, the Speaking Section of the TOEFL iBT,or the Speaking Section of the IELTS. that documents the applicant’s proficiency in spoken English. The speaking score is used for making determinations for assistantships; applicants who wish to be considered for an assistantship must receive a score of 45 or higher on the TSE, a score of 23 on the Speaking Section of the TOEFL iBT, or a score of 7 on the Speaking Section of the IELTS. This and other requirements for holding an assistantship are described in the University’s Graduate Assistantship/Associateship Policy.
      2. The applicant presents an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.6, a GRE Verbal score of at least 450 (150 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Quantitative score of at least 550 (146 on the 2011 or later version), a GRE Analytical score of at least 4.0, and a full set of excellent Qualitative Factors. In addition, applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based (or its IELTS equivalent) and also submit a score from the Test of Spoken English, the Speaking Section of the TOEFL iBT,or the Speaking Section of the IELTS. that documents the applicants’ proficiency in spoken English. The speaking score is used for making determinations for assistantships; applicants who wish to considered for an assistantship must receive a score of 45 or higher on the TSE, a score of 23 on the Speaking Section of the TOEFL iBT, or a score of 7 on the Speaking Section of the IELTS. This and other requirements for holding an assistantship are described in the University’s Graduate Assistantship/Associateship Policy.
    2. Probationary Admission. Applicants for the Ph.D. in Linguistics typically present a complete application that has one of the following:
      1. includes a GRE Verbal score of less than 450 (150);
      2. or includes a GRE Quantitative score of less than 550 (146); or
      3. includes a GRE Analytical score of less than 4.0
      4. lacks the undergraduate preparation specified above but who otherwise meet a majority of the remaining admission criteria (including a graduate GPA of at least 3.3 and for doctoral admissions, presents strong qualitative materials), will be considered for probationary admission. Students on probation must:
        • Deferred Admission Applicants for whom the admission file is incomplete will have a final decision admission deferred. In such cases, a final decision will be made only when the applicant presents a complete admission file.
        • Denial of Admission Applicants who do not meet a majority of the admission standards (both quantitative and qualitative) set forth above will be denied admission. For doctoral admission in particular, qualitative factors such as writing sample, statement of intent, or area of intended work may result in a student being denied admission even when quantitative factors are met.
        • Regarding Provisional Admission: The Department of Linguistics and TESOL does not permit Provisional Admission. All applicants must present a complete set of credentials before their application will be evaluated.

 

Special Admissions Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in TESOL

Students wishing to apply to the U.T. Arlington Graduate School solely for the purpose of earning the Graduate Certificate in TESOL must have earned an undergraduate degree at an accredited institution and present an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 (as determined by the U.T. Arlington Graduate School). Applicants for whom English is not their native language and who have not been granted an undergraduate degree by an English-medium institution must also present a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 100 iBt, or 250 if computer based, or 600 if paper based.

Students seeking to transfer from Special Student or Certificate status into a graduate degree program at U.T. Arlington must re-apply to the U.T. Arlington Graduate School as degree-seeking students and meet all published admissions requirements, including those pertaining to standardized tests. No student will be "automatically" or "exceptionally" moved from Special Student or Certifciate status into any graduate degree program.

The Web site for the U.T. Arlington Office of Graduate Studies provides additional information about graduate study at U.T. Arlington and about the admission process, including general testing requirements and other paperwork. Students may apply for admission online or request application materials be sent via post.

 

LING Courses

LING5100 – THESIS WRITING SEMINAR

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Techniques for researching and writing a thesis/dissertation in linguistics. Required of all students who have elected the Thesis or Thesis Substitute degree option in Linguistics. Prerequisite: completion of at least 9 hours of LING courses.

 

LING5110 – TESOL PRACTICUM

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

In observing ESOL classes or in teaching learners of ESOL, the student demonstrates ability to apply the principles presented in the TESOL Certificate coursework. Prerequisite: LING 5302 and LING 5305 and permission of instructor.

 

LING5190 – CONFERENCE COURSE IN LINGUISTICS

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded P/F. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 

LING5300 – LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course introduces students to the field of linguistics, the systematic study of human language. Drawing on data from a range of languages, it will examine the sound patterns of language (phonetics and phonology), words and word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and language in context (pragmatics). Emphasis will be placed on methods of linguistic analysis to solve problems in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. May not be used to fulfill M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements in linguistics

 

LING5301 – TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Presentation and critique of methodologies of teaching English to speakers of other languages, with emphasis on techniques of teaching aural comprehension; speaking, reading, and writing skills; attention to testing, language laboratory, and linguistic-cultural differences.

 

LING5302 – METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Systematic study of the application of linguistic theory and findings; emphasis on pedagogical strategies, materials, and tests; attention to current and past research and practices. Prerequisite: LING 5301.

 

LING5303 – CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS AND ERROR ANALYSIS IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH AS A SECOND OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A study of contrastive analysis and error analysis as means of defining student problems and progress; emphasis on current research; application to specific problems and contexts. Prerequisite: LING 5300 and LING 5301.

 

LING5304 – PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR OF ENGLISH

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Grammaticality, variation, and acceptability applied to teaching English as a second or foreign language. Problems of description; means of application; adaptation to current pedagogical methods. Prerequisite: LING 5300 and LING 5301.

 

LING5305 – SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Study of the processes of first and second language acquisition, their similarities and differences, language disorders, language perception and production, and implications of language acquisition research for linguistic theory and language teaching. Prerequisite: LING 5300 or permission of instructor.

 

LING5306 – TESOL CURRICULUM DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Systematic presentation of elements in development, management and evaluation of TESOL programs. Attention to needs analysis, syllabus design, materials selection and adaptation, teaching and evaluation in language curriculum design. Prerequisite: LING 5301.

 

LING5307 – PEDAGOGICAL PHONOLOGY OF ENGLISH

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A study of the sound system of English. Topics include segmental phonemes, stress, length, intonation and variation at the lexical and utterance levels. Application to teaching English as a second or foreign language. Problems of description; means of application; adaptation to current pedagogical methods. Prerequisite: LING 5300 and LING 5301.

 

LING5310 – SOCIOLINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The study of language and social context (made up of society and individuals). Content includes language as a social phenomenon, theoretical perspectives on relationship between language, society and individuals, basic concepts in sociolinguistics; and may include topics in macro- and micro-sociolinguistics such as multilingualism, language planning and standardization, linguistic variation, code switching, conversational analysis, and language and gender.

 

LING5311 – SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF SOCIETY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The study of macro-sociolinguistics, including topics such as multilingualism, language standardization and planning, literacy, language dominance, maintenance and death, language and identity, diglossia, and pidgins and creoles. Prerequisite: LING 5310.

 

LING5312 – LANGUAGE AND GENDER

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The role of language in the expression and creation of gender identities. Gender differences in language structure and use, men's and women's languages in other cultures, the acquisition of gendered ways of speaking, and sexism in language. Prerequisite: LING 5310.

 

LING5313 – TOPICS IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Selected topics relating the scientific methodologies of linguistics to larger concerns of society and culture including cognition, motivation, description and analysis. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5310.

 

LING5314 – HISTORICAL AND COMPARATIVE LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The study of language development and change; comparative method and its use in linguistic reconstruction; laws of language change. Prerequisite: LING 3330 or permission of instructor.

 

LING5320 – PHONOLOGICAL THEORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Explores the principles governing sound systems in human languages. Prerequisite: LING 3330 or permission of instructor.

 

LING5321 – ADVANCED PHONOLOGICAL THEORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A continuation of LING 5320. Topics include autosegmental analysis, lexical phonology, metrical phonology and phonological feature geometry. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5320.

 

LING5322 – LABORATORY PHONOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An investigation into the physical properties of human speech. Students will gain hands-on experience with computer-assisted speech analysis. No prior computer experience is assumed. Prerequisite: LING 5320

 

LING5326 – BILINGUALISM

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course introduces students to issues related to bilinguals and bilingualism. The areas that will be covered include different types of bilinguals/bilingualism, bilingual education, the cognitive benefits (or disadvantages) of being a bilingual, and language processing in bilinguals. Prequisite: LING 5300

 

LING5328 – PSYCHOLINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course will introduce students to psycholinguistics, or the study of the cognitive processes involved in the acquisition, comprehension, and production of language. The class will focus mainly on language perception and production by native speakers, but will also address issues related to bilingual/second language processing. Prerequisite: LING 5300.

 

LING5330 – FORMAL SYNTAX

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Explores the grammatical structures characteristic of human language by analyzing data from diverse languages within the theoretical framework of formal syntax. Prerequisite: LING 3340 or permission of instructor.

 

LING5331 – ADVANCED FORMAL SYNTAX

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A continuation of LING 5330. Investigates theoretical controversies in formal syntax and provides extensive opportunity for application in linguistic field work. Prerequisite: LING 5330

 

LING5334 – MORPHOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A theoretical and typological investigation into the nature of word-structure and word-formation processes in human languages. Prerequisite: LING 5320 or LING 5330.

 

LING5335 – LANGUAGE UNIVERSALS AND LINGUISTIC TYPOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Consideration of universals in human language, their explanation and description, and language types. Prerequisite: LING 5330.

 

LING5345 – SEMANTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Considers meaning with respect to how humans form concepts in terms of semantic features, categorization, prototype imaging, cultural scenes, scripting and coherence within world views. Prerequisite: LING 3340 or permission of instructor.

 

LING5346 – TOPICS IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING5347 – PRAGMATICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Analysis of how context and form interact with meaning. Topics may include deixis, reference, speech acts, presupposition, implicature, information structure and intonation.

 

LING5350 – TEXT ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Methods of charting and analyzing texts to reveal the systematic contributions of pragmatic choices to their organization and meaning. Prerequisite: LING 3340.

 

LING5360 – NON-WESTERN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Study of a selected non-Western language, language family or language area based on descriptive linguistic analysis. May be repeated once for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: LING 3330 and LING 3340.

 

LING5361 – READINGS IN NON-WESTERN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

May not be used to fulfill the non-Western language requirement.

 

LING5362 – LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The course discusses fundamental issues that are part of language documenting and description. These include project design, research ethics and intellectual property, researcher and community rights and responsibilities, world language ecology, technology and software, archiving issues, grant-writing fundamentals, and related issues that form best practices for language documentation projects. Prequisite: LING 5300

 

LING5363 – LANGUAGE ENDANGERMENT AND REVITALIZATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course examines language endangerment and what it means for a language to become endangered, and studies language revitalization. Case studies are presented where communities seek to maintain the number of speakers or revive the language. Also offered as LING 4363. Credit will be granted only once for Ling 4363 or LING 5363. Prerequisite: LING 5300

 

LING5370 – HISTORY OF LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Surveys the recent history of the field of linguistics and familiarizes students with the key figures and theories in recent linguistic history, with special attention to the development and emergence of generative theories of syntax, semantics, and phonology. Prerequisite: LING 5320 or LING 5330.

 

LING5371 – SURVEY OF THEORIES IN APPLIED LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A comparison and contrast of various linguistic theories, with consideration of their implications for application to real-world problems involving language. Prerequisite: LING 5305.

 

LING5372 – READINGS IN LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5330.

 

LING5380 – FIELD METHODS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The principles, techniques and practical aspects of linguistic field research. The course includes extensive practice in eliciting data (phonological, morpho-syntactic, textual and lexical) directly from a native speaker, as well as in managing, analyzing and describing the data obtained. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5300. Permission of the Graduate Advisor.

 

LING5381 – CORPUS LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Applications of ways in which computer science and linguistics inform each other. Corpus linguistics focuses on how computers can be used to both obtain the data that we examine and to provide the tools we use for analysis. Includes readings, practical experience with several different software programs, and using sources of online corpora.

 

LING5391 – CONFERENCE COURSE IN LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING5392 – THESIS SUBSTITUTE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING5393 – TESOL TEACHING AND OBSERVATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

In teaching learners of ESOL and observing ESOL classes, the student demonstrates ability to apply the principles presented in the M.A. TESOL coursework. Prerequisite: LING 5302 and LING 5305 and permission of instructor.

 

LING5395 – GRADUATE INTERNSHIP

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Employment (paid or unpaid) supervised by a faculty internship coordinator, with the student performing duties related to the academic curriculum of linguistics and/or TESOL. Students are required to submit an approved academic project related to the work performed. May be repeated with approval of Graduate Advisor.

 

LING5398 – THESIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING5698 – THESIS

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING5998 – THESIS

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING6191 – RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

LING6199 – DISSERTATION

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING6291 – RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

LING6300 – PROFESSIONAL WRITING SEMINAR

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 9 hours of LING courses.

 

LING6360 – DISCOURSE THEORY SEMINAR

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

LING6380 – FIELD METHODS SEMINAR

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: LING 5380. Permission of the Graduate Advisor.

 

LING6381 – RESEARCH DESIGN AND STATISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Practical training in methodologies and analytical techniques common in linguistic research. Topics include qualitative vs. quantitative data analysis, questionnaire design and administration, laboratory protocol, field protocol, population sampling, statistical analysis, and research ethics.

 

LING6390 – LINGUISTICS SEMINAR

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

LING6391 – RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

LING6392 – SEMINAR IN PHONETICS AND PHONOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of phonetics and/or phonology. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5321 or permission of the instructor.

 

LING6393 – SEMINAR IN SYNTAX

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of syntax. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5331 or permission of instructor.

 

LING6394 – SEMINAR IN SEMANTICS AND PRAGMATICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of meaning: semantics and/or pragmatics. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5345 or 5347 or permission of instructor.

 

LING6395 – SEMINAR IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

In-depth investigation of research into a specialized area of second language acquisition. Course registrants will develop original research focusing on topic at-hand, with results exchanged through discussion, presentations/reports, and/or papers. Prerequisites: LING 5305 or permission of the instructor.

 

LING6399 – DISSERTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING6491 – RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS

4 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

LING6591 – RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS

5 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING6691 – RESEARCH IN LINGUISTICS

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 

LING6699 – DISSERTATION

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING6999 – DISSERTATION

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

 

LING7399 – DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.