Civil Engineering

College of Engineering

 

Chair Nur Yazdani

 

Web www.uta.edu/ce/

Phone 817.272.5055

Fax 817.272.2630

 

417 Nedderman Hall

Degrees / Certificates

Master’s Degrees

Civil Engineering, M.Engr.

Civil Engineering, M.Engr. Fast Track

Civil Engineering, M.S.

Doctoral Degrees

Civil Engineering, Ph.D.

Graduate Faculty

Yvette Weatherton

Professor and Chair

Seyedali Abolmaali

Professor of Practice

Mohammad Najafi

Professor

Siamak Ardekani

Anand Puppala

James Williams

Nur Yazdani

Associate Professor

Shih-Ho Chao

Md Hossain

Laureano Hoyos

Andrew Kruzic

Stephen Mattingly

Stefan Romanoschi

Melanie Sattler

Dong-Jun Seo

Assistant Professor

Hyeok Choi

Andreas Stavridis

Xinbao Yu

Senior Lecturer

Mostafa Ghandehari

Graduate Advisors

Kristiana Hamedi

Civil Engineering, M.Engr.

Civil Engineering, M.Engr. Fast Track

Civil Engineering, M.S.

Civil Engineering, Non-Degree Seeking

Civil Engineering, Ph.D.

Melanie Sattler

Civil Engineering, M.Engr.

Civil Engineering, M.S.

Civil Engineering, Ph.D.

Department Information

Courses

 

Department Information

Objective

Admission

Grade Requirements and Continuation

Degree Requirements

Dual Program Degree

Undergraduate Coursework Credit

 

Objective

The objective of the graduate program in civil engineering is to prepare students for continued professional and scholarly development consistent with their technical interests. Students, with the assistance of a faculty advisor in their area of interest, plan their programs of study in one of the technical areas in civil engineering. Typical program and research areas are:

  1. Environmental (water and air quality control, and solid and hazardous materials control);
  2. Geotechnical (soil mechanics and foundations);
  3. Infrastructure Systems Engineering and Management;
  4. Structures and Applied Mechanics;
  5. Transportation (traffic planning, highways, airports and transit);
  6. Water Resources (hydrology and hydraulics);
  7. Construction Engineering and Management

The department provides the student an opportunity to study advanced and special topics that are on the forefront of technology. These courses carry CE 5300 or CE 6300 numbers and are identified on a student’s academic record by both number and course title. Examples of topics offered in the typical program areas are:

Construction Engineering and Management-Engineering, Technical, and Managerial Aspects of Construction Projects; Productivity of Construction Operations; Cost Estimating, Project Scheduling, Job Costing, Contracts, Specifications and Legal Aspects of Construction; Equipment Utilizations and Field Operations; Design of Construction Operations; Environmental and Sustainability Aspects of Construction Projects; Computer Applications.

Environmental - Advanced Dispersion Modeling, Analysis of Pollutant Characteristics, Hazardous Waste Remediation;

Geotechnical- Expansive Clays, Soil Chemical Stabilization;

Infrastructure Systems Engineering and Management - Civil Engineering Infrastructure Systems to Transport People, Goods, Water, Waste Water, Solid Waste, Energy and Information;

Structures and Applied Mechanics - Earthquake Engineering, Finite Elements and Mechanics, Bridge Design, Advanced Design with Timber, Masonry, Steel and Concrete;

Transportation - Intelligent Transportation Systems, Network Modeling, Urban Operations Research, Vehicular Energy Consumption and Emissions, Transit and Paratransit, Intermodal Systems;

Water Resources - Kinematic Wave Theory, Urban Hydrology, Distributed Modeling, Physical Modeling, and Boundry Layer Theory.

Masters (M.S. and M.Engr.) Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Fundamental Knowledge: Graduates will have extensive basic and applied knowledge in their selected Civil Engineering Program (CEP) interest area.
  2. Independent Abilities: Graduates will have the ability to conduct independent and original study ranging from gathering of information to application, analysis, creation, documentation of the study, and its resolution.
  3. Critical Thinking: Graduates will have extensive breadth and ability to critique and synthesize literature, review results and to apply this knowledge in developing new ideas, in designing and evaluating scientific investigations, and in assessing, interpreting and understanding data relating to their selected CEP interest area.
  4. Advanced Knowledge: Graduates will demonstrate extensive mastery of the subject matter at a deeper theoretical and applied level beyond the fundamental knowledge gained in his/her undergraduate course sequence.
  5. Effective Communication: Graduates will have the ability to present scientific results in both written and oral format in various forums including thesis defense, master’s defense, project reports, manuscripts, professional society meetings, journals, and performing class lectures, presentations, and reports.
  6. Professional Development: A student graduating with a master’s degree in civil engineering is expected to demonstrate interest in pursuing life long learning by attaining professional licenses, and obtaining professional development hours by attendance at conferences, higher educational classes, short courses and seminars, conducting classes, and publishing.

Ph.D. Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Fundamental Knowledge: Graduates will command profound basic and applied knowledge in their specialty area within their Civil Engineering Program (CEP) interest area.
  2. Independent Abilities: Graduates will have the ability to conduct a major independent and original research study that includes gathering of information, gaining an understanding of the process of academic or commercial exploitation of research results, demonstrating an understanding of contemporary research issues, effective project management, synthesis and evaluation, and appropriate dissemination of research findings.
  3. Critical Thinking: Graduates will have a profound ability to critique and synthesize literature, review results and to apply knowledge gained from literature to develop new ideas, to design and evaluate scientific investigations, and to assess, interpret and understand data related to their specialty area within their CEP interest area.
  4. Advanced Knowledge: Graduates will demonstrate profound mastery of the subject matter at a deeper theoretical and applied level well beyond fundamental knowledge gained in the undergraduate course sequence and the higher-level knowledge gained in the master’s level course sequence.
  5. Effective Communication: Graduates will have the ability to construct coherent arguments and articulate ideas clearly to an audience, through a variety of techniques, constructively defend research outcomes, justify their research to the profession and promote the public understanding of their research fields.
  6. Professional Development:A student graduating with a doctoral degree in civil engineering is expected to demonstrate interest in pursuing life long learning by attaining professional licenses, and obtaining professional development hours by attendance at conferences, higher educational classes, short courses and seminars, conducting classes, and publishing.

 

Admission

Performance on the GRE will not be the sole criterion for admitting applicants or the primary criterion to deny admission to either the master’s or Ph.D. program. In cases where GRE performance is relatively poor all other qualifications presented by the applicant will be carefully evaluated for evidence of potential for success.

 

CE Master’s Program

Unconditional Admission

A student must meet the following requirements for unconditional admission:

  1. A Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering (Applicant with an appropriate Bachelor’s Degree in another discipline is considered, subject to satisfactory completion of deficiency courses for area of interest.)
  2. An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, as calculated by the Graduate School, is typical of a successful applicant.
  3. A Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Quantitative score of 700 (old score system) or 155 (new score system) or higher is typical of a successful applicant.
  4. A Graduate Record Exam Verbal score of 390 (old score system) or 146 (new score system) or higher is typical of a successful applicant.
  5. For applicants whose native language is not English, a minimum score of 558 on the written Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 220 on the computer TOEFL, 83 on TOEFL iBT, 40 on the TSE-A, 50 on the SPEAK, 400 on Verbal GRE, 85 on METLAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery), or 7 on the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). (METLAB and IELTS are used only when other tests are not available in the applicant’s country.)
  6. Favorable letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant’s academic work.
Probationary Admission

If applicants do not meet a majority of standards for unconditional admission outlined above, they may be considered for probationary admission after careful examination of their application materials. Probationary admission may require that the applicant receive a B or better in at least their first 9 hours of graduate coursework applicable to their degree being sought at UT Arlington, take additional English courses, and/or deficiency courses as required.

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline, but whom otherwise appears to meet admission requirements may be granted provisional admission.

Deferred Admission

A deferred application decision may be granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.

Denial of Admission

A candidate may be denied admission if they have less than satisfactory performance on a majority of the admission criteria described above.

Waiver of GRE Admission

A waiver of the GRE may be considered for a UT Arlington graduate who has completed an undergraduate degree within the past 3 years from normal undergraduate feeder program for CE degree. Students must complete the last 60 hours of study and in all undergraduate coursework completed at UT Arlington. The student must comply with all other requirements for admission to the Graduate School , i.e., submitting application, paying fees, providing required transcripts, letters of reference, etc. The applicant’s record will be assessed for evidence of strengths relevant to success in the Civil Engineering graduate program. Meeting the minimum GPA requirement shall not be the sole determinant or the primary criterion for granting a waiver.

Facilitated Admission of Outstanding UT Arlington Undergraduates

Facilitated Admission may be considered for a student who has graduated from UT Arlington no more than one academic year prior to proposed entrance to the graduate program. Students must complete the last 60 hours of study at UT Arlington. The student’s UT Arlington GPA must equal or exceed 3.5 in the last 60 hours of undergraduate study and all undergraduate coursework completed at UT Arlington. The applicant’s record will be assessed for evidence of strengths relevant to success in the Civil Engineering graduate program. Meeting the minimum GPA requirement shall not be the sole determinant or the primary criterion for granting facilitated admission.

Fast Track Program for Master’s Degree in Civil Engineering

The Fast Track Program enables outstanding senior undergraduate Civil Engineering students to receive undergraduate and graduate credit for up to six hours of coursework. Technical electives which are dual-listed as graduate courses will satisfy both bachelor’s and master’s degree requirements. Students pursuing an MECE degree may take up to two courses for dual credit.

Interested undergraduate Civil Engineering students should apply to the Graduate School for admission to the Fast Track Program when they are within 30 hours of completing their bachelor’s degree (and before graduation). For admission consideration, they must have completed at least 30 hours at UT Arlington and have an overall and College of Engineering GPA of at least 3.0 (in both). Additionally, they must have completed a set of three basic undergraduate foundation courses with a grade of B or higher in each course and a GPA of at least 3.3 in these three courses. The specific foundation courses vary according to the student’s desired specialty area for the master’s degree.

In their final semester as an undergraduate, Fast Track students in good standing will be automatically admitted to graduate school with consent of the Graduate Advisor. No fees, transcripts, or test scores will be required. For further information about this program, contact an undergraduate advisor or the Graduate Advisor in Civil Engineering.

Departmental Scholarships

Students that are unconditionally admitted will be eligible for available scholarships. Award of scholarships will be based on consideration of the same criteria utilized in admission decisions. To be eligible, candidates must have a GPA of 3.0 in their last 60 undergraduate credit hours (if entering Graduate School within one year of being granted a Bachelor Degree) plus any graduate credit hours as calculated by the Graduate School. Recipients must maintain at least a 3.0 overall GPA, and must be enrolled in a minimum of 9 hours of coursework in both long semesters to retain their scholarship. Additional requirements may be imposed by the department selection committee.

CE Doctoral Program

Unconditional Admission

A student must meet the following requirements for unconditional admission:

  1. A Master’s Degree or at least 30 hours of graduate coursework in Civil Engineering. (Applicant with a Master’s Degree in another discipline is considered, subject to satisfactory completion of deficiency courses for the CE area of interest.)
  2. No specific GPA requirement (application considered as a whole). However, a graduate coursework GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, as calculated by the Graduate School, is typical of a successful applicant.
  3. A Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Quantitative score of 740 (old score system) or 158 (new score system) or higher is typical of a successful applicant.
  4. A competitive Graduate Record Examination Verbal score. A successful applicant typically has a Verbal score of 420 (old score system) or 148 (new score system).
  5. For applicants whose native language is not English, a minimum score of 563 on the written Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 222 on the computer TOEFL, 84 on TOEFL iBT, 40 on the TSE-A, 50 on the SPEAK, 425 on Verbal GRE, 86 on METLAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery), or 7 on the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). (METLAB and IELTS are used only when other tests are not available in the applicant’s country.)
  6. Favorable letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant’s academic work and/or professional work.
Probationary Admission

If applicants do not meet a majority of standards for unconditional admission outlined above, they may be considered for probationary admission after careful examination of their application materials. Probationary admission may require that the applicant receive a B or better in at least their first 9 hours of graduate coursework applicable to their degree being sought at UT Arlington, take additional English courses, and/or deficiency courses as required.

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline, but whom otherwise appears to meet admission requirements may be granted provisional admission.

Deferred Admission

A deferred application decision may be granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.

Denial of Admission

A candidate may be denied admission if they have less than satisfactory performance on a majority of the admission criteria described above.

Departmental Scholarships and Fellowships

Students that are unconditionally admitted will be eligible for available scholarship and/or fellowship support. Award of scholarships or fellowships will be based on consideration of the same criteria utilized in admission decisions. To be eligible for a departmental scholarship, candidates must have a GPA of 3.5 in their graduate credit hours. Recipients must maintain at least a 3.5 overall graduate GPA in courses taken as a doctoral student and enroll in a minimum of 9 hours of coursework in both long semesters to retain their scholarship. To be eligible for fellowship consideration, candidates must be first-year doctoral or PhD-bound student, must hold an assistantship of at least 25% time, must have a GPA of 3.25 in their last 60 undergraduate credit hours plus a GPA of 3.25 in any graduate credit hours. Recipients must maintain at least a 3.25 overall graduate GPA in courses taken as a doctoral student and enroll in a minimum of 6 hours of coursework in both long semesters to retain their fellowship. Students who hold a 50% assistantship must maintain full-time enrollment of at least 9 hours. Additional requirements may be imposed by the department selection committee.

CE BS-Ph.D. Program

Uncondtional Admission

A student must meet the following requirements for unconditional admission:

  1. No Specific GPA requirement (application considered as a whole). However, an undergraduate coursework GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, as calculated by the Graduate School, is typical of a successful applicant.
  2. A Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Quantitative score of 740 (old score system) or 158 (new score system) or higher is typical of a successful applicant.
  3. A competitve Graduate Record Examination Verbal score. A successful applicant typically has a Verbal score of 420 (old score system) or 148 (new score system).
  4. For applicants whose native language is not English, a minimum score of 563 on the written Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 222 on the computer TOEFL, 84 on TOEFL iBT, 40 on the TSE-A, 50 on the SPEAK, 86 on METLAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery), or 7 on the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). (METLAB and IELTS are used only when other tests are not available in the applicant’s country.)
  5. Favorable letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant’s academic work and/or professional work.
Probationary Admission

If applicants do not meet a majority of standards for unconditional admission outlined above, they may be considered for probationary admission after careful examination of their application materials. Probationary admission may require that the applicant receive a B or better in at least their first 9 hours or graduate coursework applicable to their degree being sought at UT Arlington, take additional English courses, and/or defieciency courses as required.

Grade Requirements and Continuation

The Civil Engineering Graduate Program has established rules, regulations, policies, and procedures for continuation in the graduate program and fulfilling graduation requirements. These can be found in the Civil Engineering Graduate Handbook available in the Civil Engineering Office. In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School listed elsewhere, to continue in the program each civil engineering graduate student must:

  1. Maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher for the Master’s program and a Ph.D. or a BS-PhD. student must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.5 or higher in their Ph.D. Civil Engineering coursework and a 3.25 gpa outside of CE average to take the comprehensive examination and to graduate from the Civil Engineering Ph.D. program or BS-Ph.D. program.

No organized course in which a grade of P is received can be used to satisfy course requirements for a graduate degree in civil engineering.

Degree Requirements

The responsibility rests with each student for knowing the rules, regulations, and filing deadlines of the Graduate School and the Civil Engineering Committee on Graduate Studies (see Civil Engineering Graduate Handbook available in Civil Engineering Office). Requirements of the Graduate School and the Civil Engineering Committee on Graduate Studies must be met. The degrees offered and minimum course requirements are identified in the following paragraphs.

The Master of Science degree is a research-oriented program in which completion of a thesis is mandatory. The program consists of a minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework and an acceptable thesis (six credit hours). The Master of Engineering degree is an engineering practice-oriented program requiring a minimum of 36 credit hours. A maximum of six hours may be a special project. A final program examination is required of all master’s degree candidates. Thesis degree candidates will be required to present an oral defense of the thesis. Non-thesis degree candidates will fulfill the program examination requirement upon the successful completion of CE 5193, Master’s Comprehensive Examination. Candidates must enroll in CE 5193 in the semester they intend to graduate.

The Ph.D. degree is a research degree and, as such, requires the candidate to successfully carry out original, independent research in an area acceptable to the civil engineering faculty. Normally, a minimum of one year of advanced coursework beyond the master’s degree is required.

The BS-Ph.D. degree is a research degree and, as such, requires the candidate to successfully carry out original, independent research in an area acceptable to the civil engineering faculty. Normally, a minimum of 48 credits of coursework beyond the bachelor’s degree is required.

Dual Program Degree

Students in the Civil Engineering program may participate in a dual degree program whereby they can earn a Master’s Degree in Civil Engineering and a Master of City and Regional Planning. By participating in a dual degree program, students can apply a number of semester hours jointly to meet the requirements of both degrees, thus reducing the total number of hours required to earn both degrees separately. The number of hours that may be jointly applied ranges from six to 18 hours, subject to the approval of each program’s Committee on Graduate Studies and Graduate Advisor. Those interested in the dual degree program should consult the appropriate graduate programs for further information on course requirements, including information regarding which courses are suitable for joint application of credit hours.

To participate in the dual degree program, students must make a separate application to each program, be accepted by each program, and must submit separate Programs of Work for each degree showing only courses that meet requirements for the specified degree, including those joint courses that meet requirements for both degrees. A student must be admitted to the second program before completing more than 15 semester hours in the first, exclusive of leveling, deficiency, or foundation courses, and must complete the second degree within one academic year following completion of the first. See also the statement on "Dual Degree Programs" in the general admission section of this catalog.

Undergraduate Coursework Credit

A limited number (not to exceed a total of nine semester hours) of the following courses may be applicable toward a graduate degree if approved in advance by the Civil Engineering Graduate Advisor.

4301. CONSTRUCTION JOB COST CONTROL

4302. INFRASTRUCTURE EVALUATION AND MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT

4305. TRENCHLESS TECHNOLOGY METHODS

4306. PIPELINE ASSET MANAGEMENT

4311. URBAN TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING

4312. STREET AND HIGHWAY DESIGN

4313. TRAFFIC ENGINEERING

4320. EARTH STRUCTURES DESIGN

4321. FOUNDATION ENGINEERING

4322. APPLICATIONS WITH GEOSYNTHETICS

4323. LANDFILL DESIGN

4324. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS II

4325. FUNDAMENTALS OF FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

4332. CONSTRUCTION METHODS AND MANAGEMENT

4330. HYDRAULIC DESIGN

4334. CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, CONTRACTS AND SPECIFICATIONS

4336. HOT MIX ASPHALT DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

4337. PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS

4348. STRUCTURAL DESIGN IN METALS

4350. INTRODUCTION TO AIR POLLUTION

4351. PHYSICAL UNIT PROCESSES

4353. WATER CHEMISTRY

4354. INTRODUCTION TO HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

4355. DESIGN OF WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES

4358. OPEN CONDUIT SYSTEM

4360. DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL MASONRY

4361. ADVANCED REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN

4363. FUNDAMENTALS OF PRESTRESSED CONCRETE

4365. STRUCTURAL WOOD DESIGN

4366. FUNDAMENTALS OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

4368. ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

4369. LOADS ON STRUCTURES

 

CE Courses

CE5191 – ADVANCED STUDIES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Individual studies of advanced topics under the supervision of a professor or professors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE5193 – MASTER'S COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Directed study, consultation, and comprehensive examination over coursework leading to the Master of Engineering degree in civil engineering. Required of all Master of Engineering students in the semester they plan to graduate.

 

CE5300 – TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Topics of current interest in the field of civil engineering. The subject title is listed in the class schedule and in the student's record. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE5302 – PLAIN CONCRETE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Basic properties and interactions of hydraulic cements and mineral aggregates in concrete. Topics associated with the properties of plastic and hardened concrete and modifications through the use of admixtures. Also addressed are handling, and placement problems. Other topics will include quality control and acceptance testing; lightweight, heavyweight, and other special concretes. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3261.

 

CE5303 – INTRODUCTION TO FINITE ELEMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Stiffness method using basic equations and virtual work; element equations using shape functions for axial, beam, frame, two dimensional elements; stiffness method for three dimensional structures. Flexibility method; finite element modeling and optimization of idealized structures. Credit not granted for both CE 4325 and CE 5303. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3341.

 

CE5304 – LIGHT GAGE STEEL DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Covers structural design issues for cold formed steel structures. Includes initial buckling and post buckling, stiffened and unstiffened plate behavior, braced and unbraced beams, columns, connectors and shear diaphragms. Building codes, American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) specifications, material specifications, test methods, and recommended practice documents. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 4348 or CE 5306.

 

CE5305 – FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to basic analysis, design and manufacture of composite materials for engineered structures. Fiber materials, tapes, cloths, resin systems, elastic constants, matrix formulation, theory of failure. The course will also cover an introduction to design with composites, preliminary design, optimization, processing variables, product design. Credit not granted for both CE 4366 and CE 5305. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3341.

 

CE5306 – STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The basic design course for steel structures emphasizing Load Resistant Factor Design Method. Topics include tension members, compression members, flexural members, and simple connections. Building codes, American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) specifications, material specifications, test methods, and recommended practice documents. Credit not granted for both CE 4348 and CE 5306. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3341.

 

CE5307 – STRUCTURAL TIMBER DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Covers material grade, properties of wood, design criteria using structural lumber, glue laminated lumber and structural panels. Design of bending and compression members, trusses and shear diaphragms. Building codes, National Design Specifications (NDS) , material specifications, test methods, and recommended practice documents. Credit not granted for both CE 4365 and CE 5307. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3341.

 

CE5308 – STRUCTURAL MASONRY DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Covers masonry unit type and grades of mortar types, reinforcing and connectors. Design of beams, columns, pilasters, and walls. Structural behavior and construction practices. Includes plain and reinforced masonry. Building codes, Masonry Standard Joint Committee (MSJC) specifications, material specifications, test methods, and recommended practice documents. Credit not granted for both CE 4360 and CE 5308. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 3341.

 

CE5309 – PRESTRESSED CONCRETE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to pre-tensioned and post-tensioned concrete structures, bonded and unbonded construction, hardware, stress calculations, section proportioning, flexural design, shear design, prestress losses, deflections, allowable stress, load-balancing, and ultimate strength design/analysis methods, including: partially prestressed systems shear design, analysis and design of composite beams, design of prestressed concrete bridges. Both American Concrete Institute (ACI 318-318) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Load and Resistance Factor Design (AASHTO LRFD) provisions will be discussed. Credit not granted for both CE 4363 and CE 5309. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 4347.

 

CE5310 – PLASTIC ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF STRUCTURES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Behavior of structural members beyond elastic range; plastic analysis of steel and concrete members and framed structures; stepwise incremental load and mechanism methods; yield/failure mechanisms for various types of frames. Use of nonlinear structural analysis programs and design code provisions. Application to earthquake resistant design. Prerequisite: CE 4347 and CE 4348; or equivalent.

 

CE5311 – ADVANCED STEEL DESIGN I

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Covers torsional design of beams, beams with web holes, composite design of beams, lateral-torsional buckling of beams, plate buckling, column design and behavior, frame stability, bracing requirements for compression members. Prerequisite: CE 4348 or CE 5306.

 

CE5312 – ADVANCED CONCRETE DESIGN I

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Includes structural design of slender columns, walls, truss model for shear and torsion; structural systems such as continuous beams, two-way slabs, yield-line theory and shear friction. Behavior of reinforced concrete structures, with emphasis on ductility and detailing of frames, slabs, and detailing for seismic loads will be covered. Building codes, American Concrete Institute (ACI) specifications, material specifications, test methods, and recommended practice documents. Credit not granted for both CE 4361 and CE 5312. Prerequisite: CE 4347.

 

CE5314 – ADVANCED STEEL DESIGN II

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Covers structural design of beam columns and building connections. Rigid frame and multi-story building design issues. Building codes, American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) specifications, and recommended practice documents. Prerequisite: CE 4348 or CE 5306.

 

CE5315 – ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Analysis of stresses and strains at a point, stress-strain relationships, stresses due to various leading conditions, theories of failure, energy methods, shear center, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, torsion in closed and open cell cross-sections, principles of plastic analysis, and buckling analysis. Credit not granted for both CE 4324 and CE 5315. Prerequisite: CE 2313.

 

CE5316 – CURRENT TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The course provides graduate students with background, knowlege, technology, theory, and application on some "emerging topics" in environmental engineering fields, including water pollution, water and wastewater treatment, post-treatment issues, remediation of contaminated groundwater, soil and sediment, waste management, sustainable engineering, and energy and the environment.

 

CE5317 – ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PROCESS AND ANALYSIS LAB

2 Lecture Hours  ·  3 Lab Hours

Lectures will cover advanced analytical procedures for the analyses of air, liquid, and other wastes, including optical, chromatographic, electrical, and other instrumental methods of anlysis. In the laboratory, students will demonstrate and analyze environmental engineering processes (physical/chemical) for treatment of contaminants, including absorption, gas transfer, acid/base reactions, floccultaion, sedimentation, filtration, ion-exchange, percipitation, oxidation-reduction, as well as basic reactor types (CSTR, plug flow, and reactors in series).

 

CE5318 – PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES I

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Principles of unit process modeling using reactor and kinetic theory, theory and design of mixing, mass transfer, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and gas transfer. Credit not granted for both CE 4351 and CE 5318. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and CE 3334; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5319 – PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES II

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Principles of water chemistry applied to the theory and design of unit processes including coagulation, precipitation, corrosion, oxidation-reduction, and membrane processes. Credit not granted for both CE4353 and CE5319 Prerequisite: CE 3131 and CE 3334; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5321 – ENGINEERING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Fundamental principles of engineering science applicable to the comprehension and design of engineered environmental systems. Includes water and air quality indices; kinetic and reactor theory; mass and energy balances; fluid system theory; and applications of physical, chemical and biological processes in the design of engineered environmental systems. May not be used to satisfy any of the requirements for a graduate degree in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite: PHYS 1441, CHEM 1442, and MATH 2425.

 

CE5325 – BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Biological processes used in water quality control. Includes principles from microbiology and biochemistry applied to suspended and attached growth systems. Prerequisite: CE 5318.

 

CE5326 – WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Design of facilities commonly used in water and wastewater treatment plants including pumps, pipelines, channels, flow measurement and control devices, screens, grit removal, mixing, sludge removal, aeration equipment, and chemical feed and storage. Materials of construction, process control interface, and operation and maintenance factors are also discussed. Credit not granted for both CE 4355 and CE 5326. Prerequisite: CE 3131, CE 3142, and CE 3334.

 

CE5328 – FUNDAMENTALS OF AIR POLLUTION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An introduction to the air pollution field including: atmosphere and ideal gas law; pollutant types, sources, effects; Clean Air Act; air pollution measurement; overviews of air pollution meteorology, dispersion modeling, air pollution control, and mobile sources; international air pollution; and indoor air quality. Credit not granted for both CE 4350 and CE 5328. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in CE 3334 or CE 5321 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5329 – ENVIRONMENTAL RISK BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Process for the assessment and response to contamination; integrating risk and exposure practices to ensure protection of human health and environment. Includes characterization, EPA tier approach, general aspects of toxicology, dose exposure, pathways, receptors, migration and risk assessment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE5330 – CHARACTERISTICS OF TRAFFIC

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The fundamental elements of traffic - the driver, the vehicle, and the roadway - are considered and then extended into studies of streams of traffic flow. Techniques of conducting traffic engineering studies, including methods of measuring speed, volume, and density, are covered along with methods for the determination of capacity on freeways and rural highways (uninterrupted flow facilities). Parking and accident studies are also included. Prerequisite: CE 3302; and CE 3301 or concurrent registration therein.

 

CE5331 – TRAFFIC ENGINEERING OPERATIONS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Methods of traffic regulation and control optimization. Traffic laws, motorist communication by means of traffic control devices, and the design and operation of both fixed time and actuated traffic signals at intersections. Analysis and design techniques for intersections using capacity and level of service concepts. Credit will not be granted for both CE 4313 and CE 5331. Prerequisite: CE 3302; and CE 3301 or concurrent registration therein.

 

CE5332 – HIGHWAY DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Geometric considerations necessary for the design of city streets, highways, and freeways such as the cross sections, vertical and horizontal alignment, sight distances and stopping distances. Includes the design of maneuver areas, channelization, ramps, intersections, and interchanges. Credit will not be granted for both CE 4312 and CE 5332. Prerequisite: CE 3302.

 

CE5333 – TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Control algorithms and optimization of splits, offsets, and cycle lengths for arterial progression and traffic signals in networks; computer simulation techniques; problem solving with computer simulation and optimization packages; freeway control using ramp meters and dynamic motorist communications. Prerequisite: CE 4313 or CE 5331.

 

CE5335 – AIRPORT ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Airport master planning, for forecasting air travel demand, airside capacity, passenger terminal design, air traffic control, land access planning and design, landside operations, air cargo facility design. Prerequisite: CE 3302.

 

CE5336 – PAVEMENT DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Principles and theoretical concepts of rigid and flexible pavements for highways and airfields; effects of traffic loads, natural forces, and material quality; current design practices; and live cycle cost analysis. Prerequisite: CE 3302, CE 3261, and CE 3343.

 

CE5337 – URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Theory and application of a comprehensive urban transportation planning methodology. Basic studies of population dynamics, urban growth, land use, forecasting trip generation and distribution, traffic assignment, mode split, evaluation, simulation models, characteristics of mass transit and other non-auto modes, and system design and evaluation. Credit will not be granted for both CE 4311 and CE 5337. Prerequisite: CE 3301 and CE 3302; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5338 – SYSTEM EVALUATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Techniques necessary to perform economic and multi-criteria evaluations of civil engineering projects. These will be used to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different decision-making strategies and analyze contemporary topics and case studies in making civil engineering decisions. Prerequisite: CE 3310 or IE 3312 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

 

CE5341 – PAVEMENT EVALUATION, REHABILITATION AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Pavement inventory; condition and structural evaluation techniques; serviceability concepts; deterioration modeling; maintenance vs. rehabilitation vs. reconstruction; economic considerations, selection of project alternatives and life cycle cost analysis. Prerequisite: CE 5336 or equivalent

 

CE5344 – CONSTRUCTION METHODS: FIELD OPERATIONS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to the methods, equipment, and management techniques used in the construction industry. Topics include equipment operating characteristics, job site safety, and field management. Credit not granted for both CE 4332 and CE 5344. Prerequisite: CE 3343.

 

CE5345 – INFRASTRUCTURE EVALUATION, MAINTENANCE, AND RENEWAL

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course is designed for engineers and managers involved in infrastructure development, sustainability, and replacement. Topics include asset management, inspection, evaluation, maintenance, and renewal alternatives for waste collection and water distribution systems, surface and subsurface drainage, pavements, bridges, culverts, buildings, and other structures. Credit not granted for both CE 4302 and CE 5345. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE5346 – OPEN CHANNEL FLOW

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Open channel hydraulic principles, flow classification, backwater curves, transitions, obstructions, bends, flood flow computations, and urban watershed applications. Credit not granted for both CE 4358 and CE 5346. Prerequisite: CE 3305 and CE 4328; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5347 – ADVANCED HYDROLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Elements of hydrometeorology, infiltration, soil moisture, hydrographs, rainfall runoff relationships, and effects of these factors with regard to water resources, urban watersheds, flood control, and environmental issues. Prerequisite: CE 3309 and CE 4328.

 

CE5348 – GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Hydrology and hydrogeology of groundwater to include aquifer and vadose properties and measurements, basic flow systems and solutions, well systems, elementary contaminate transport, water quality, recharge, subsidence, flow system analysis, flow nets, and leaky aquifers. Prerequisite: CE 3309 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5351 – ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Advanced analysis of indeterminate beams, frames, trusses, arches, and cables. Credit will not be given for both CE 5351 and CE 4348. Prerequisite: CE 3341.

 

CE5353 – ADVANCED HYDRAULICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Flow resistance, St. Venant equations, solution of St. Venant by finite difference methods, dam break problem, water hammer intro to finite elements to open channel flow. Credit will not be granted for both CE 4330 and CE 5353. Prerequisite: CE 5346 and CE 5347; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5354 – WATER RESOURCES PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Historical and current water development concepts. Administrative and allocation concerns. General principles and procedures of water resource planning includes regional, multipurpose, economic and systems considerations. Prerequisite: CE 3301, CE 3309, and IE 3312; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5356 – SURFACE WATER QUALITY MODELING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Contaminant transport and fate in surface water. Engineering methods assessing surface water and transport for water and sediment quality. Modeling dissolved oxygen, chemicals and waterborne substances. Prerequisite: CE 5346.

 

CE5357 – HYDROLOGIC TECHNIQUES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A study of current hydrologic techniques and methods for the analysis of hydrologic variables necessary in the design of projects such as bridges, culverts, reservoirs. Techniques involve extreme value statistics, model hydrographs, deterministic and stochastic methods for data analysis. Prerequisite: CE 5347 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5358 – SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Sources, chemistry, monitoring, and classifications of hazardous wastes. Discussions of environmental hazards, legal aspects, transportation, detoxification, storage, and disposal and incineration. Credit not granted for both CE 4354 and CE 5358. Prerequisite: CE 3334 or CE 5321 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5359 – GROUNDWATER CONTAMINANT MODELING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Study of sources and fates of contamination in groundwater. Mathematical modeling of reactive and nonreactive pollutant movement. Aquifer restoration strategies. Prerequisite: CE 5348.

 

CE5360 – UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS II

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Advanced principles of unsaturated soil behavior in light of critical state based soil mechanics. Topics: Cam-Clay model for saturated soils, Cam-Clay model for unsaturated soils, and calibration/programming of Barcelona Basic Model for unsaturated soils.

 

CE5361 – DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF ASPHALT CONCRETE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An in-depth study of the properties of constituent materials for asphalt concrete mixtures. Design methods for Hot-Mixes Asphalt (HMA) and Stone Matrix Asphalt (SMA). Theory and practice of asphalt concrete mix for pavements, including specifications and construction methods for hot-mix asphalt and surface treatments. Maintenance and rehabilitation of flexible pavements. Relationships of material engineering properties to pavement design and performance. Credit not granted for both CE 4336 and CE 5361. Prerequisite: CE 3261 or equivalent.

 

CE5362 – RIGID PAVEMENTS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Portland cement concrete mix design and production. Paving operations. Saw and seal operations. Subgrade preparation. Base selection. Drainage selection, design and construction. Bonded and unbonded concrete overlays. Whitetopping and ultra-thin whitetopping. Concrete pavement restoration; quality assurance and quality control in concrete pavement construction. Credit not granted for both CE 4337 and CE 5362. Prerequisite: CE 3261 or equivalent.

 

CE5363 – CONSTITUTIVE MODELING OF SOILS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Fundamental aspects of elasto-plastic behavior of soils along axisymmetric stress paths, shear strength of soils in light of critical state soil mechanics, and constitutive models to predict soil response under saturated conditions, including Cam Clay and modified Cam Clay models. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5364 – FOUNDATION ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The design, construction, and performance of footings, rafts, and piles founded on or in sands, clays, silts, stratified soils, and weak rock. Includes the influence of various geologic terrain on selecting foundation type and constructability, in-situ investigations to determine material design parameters, bearing capacity, and settlement of foundations. Credit not granted for both CE 4321 and CE 5364. Prerequisite: CE 3343.

 

CE5365 – THEORETICAL SOIL MECHANICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Theory of consolidation, magnitude, time rate, pore pressure dissipation with variable construction rate and layered soils. Secondary compression, preconsolidation, and preloading. Shear strength of soil. Critical state soil mechanics, dilation and strain-softening in drained shear, pore pressure response in undrained shear, including static liquefaction. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5366 – SOIL DYNAMICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Fundamental aspects of mechanical behavior and characterization of soils and earth structures subjected to dynamic loads, including wave propagation in soils, dynamic soil properties, liquefaction of soils, dynamic bearing capacity of shallow foundations, seismic design of retaining walls, and seismic slope stability. Prerequisite: CE 2210 and CE 3343; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5367 – DESIGN OF EARTH STRUCTURES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Study of the states of stress and analysis techniques associated with cuts, fills, and retaining structures. Includes slope stability, embankment reinforcement, conventional and reinforced earth retaining walls, excavation bracing, and sheet pile wharf structures. Credit not granted for both CE 4320 and CE 5367. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5368 – UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Fundamental aspects of the mechanical behavior of unsaturated soils, including stress and volumetric state variables, matrix suction measurements and soil-water characteristic curves, shear-strain-strength and volume change responses, suction-controlled laboratory testing techniques and constitutive modeling. Prerequisite: CE 3343 and CE 5363; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5369 – COMPUTATIONAL GEOTECHNICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to analytical, finite differences, and finite element modeling, analyses of embankments, earth dams, slopes, excavation support systems including soldier pile and diaphragm walls, shallow and deep foundation systems, and other geostructures using different geotechnical software. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5370 – EXPERIMENTAL SOIL MECHANICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Fundamentals of experimental studies of soil behavior, soil properties and their laboratory test methods which include consolidation, direct shear, static triaxial, cyclic triaxial, resonant column, bender elements and other advanced geotechnical laboratory tests, instrumentation and measurement techniques. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5371 – SOIL BEHAVIOR

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Fundamental aspects of soil behavior, bonding, crystal structure, surface characteristics, clay mineralogy, soil-water movement, fabric, effective stress concepts, conduction phenomena, consolidation, and shear strength. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5372 – GEOSYNTHETICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Geosynthetics properties and testing, design of geotextiles, geogrids, geonets, and geomembranes for applications in separation, pavement, embankment and retaining wall reinforcement, soil stabilization, filtration, drainage and liquid barrier, construction guidelines and case histories. Credit not granted for both CE 4322 and CE 5372. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5373 – ENVIRONMENTAL GEOTECHNOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Physical and chemical principles of clays, clay mineralogy, coupled flow, hydraulic conductivity, in situ and laboratory tests, chemical transport, adsorption of chemicals, risk assessment and soil remediation technologies, bioremediation, phytoremediation, electrokinetics and soil washing, waste containment. Prerequisite: CE 5371 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5374 – GROUND IMPROVEMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction and types of ground improvement for different problem soils including soft and expansive soils, shallow and deep soil densification, sand drains and wick drains, chemical modification, chemical binders and mechanisms of ground improvement, different types of grouting, deep mixing, stone columns, soil nailing, ground anchors, geosynthetics, MSE walls, reinforced slopes. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5375 – GEOTECHNICAL ASPECTS OF LANDFILLS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction and types of landfills, landfill site selection, siting and configuration, compacted and geosynthetic clay liners, final cover design, landfill settlement and slope stability, post closure uses of landfills, leachate and gas generation, collection and removal system, bioreactor landfills and future trends. Credit not granted for both CE 4323 and CE 5375. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5376 – GIS IN GEOTECHNICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to GIS,Geographical Information Systems, (ArcInfo/ArcView) based applications in geotechnical engineering, including bore-log database management and profiling, spatial analyses and assessment of liquefaction, ground motion amplification, landslide, and groundwater contamination hazard potentials. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

 

CE5377 – CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT & JOB COSTING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Financial aspects and job costing of a construction project. Includes project management principles, budgets, cost codes, cost-to-complete, and financial reports specific to the management of a construction company and project control. Credit not granted for both CE 4301 and CE 5377. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE5378 – CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS, SPECIFICATIONS, & ADMINISTRATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Types of construction contracts, contractual relationship between general contractor and owner, contractual relationship between general contractor and subcontractors, legal issues in construction administration, insurance, and concepts in value engineering. Reading and evaluating specifications, CSI Master Format. Credit not granted for both CE 4334 and CE 5378. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE5379 – CONSTRUCTION COST ESTIMATING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Types of estimates, development of unit costs, quantity takeoff, cost estimating using manual methods and computerized cost estimating, budgets, and costs. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in CE 5386.

 

CE5383 – EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to experimental stress-analysis techniques. Theory and application of mechanical strain gages, electrical strain gages, introduction to photoelastic and thermal techniques, and brittle coatings. Prerequisite: CE 2313.

 

CE5384 – CONCRETE BRIDGE DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Analysis and design of concrete bridges for vehicles using American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Load and Resistance Factor Design (AASHTO LRFD) specifications. Covers bridge type selection, preliminary design, bridge design loads, bridge deck design, shear design including strut-and-tie model, AASHTO limit states, torsion design, substructure design, and construction practices maintenance issues. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CE 4363 or CE 5309.

 

CE5385 – STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Equation of motion for single degree of freedom systems including: free vibration; harmonic and periodic excitations; arbitrary, step and pulse excitations. Dynamic response of multi degree of freedom systems including: free vibration; computation of vibration properties of structures; damping in structures; modal analysis; and response history analysis. Dynamic analysis of systems with distributed mass. Prerequisite: CE 5303 or concurrent registration.

 

CE5386 – CONSTRUCTION PLANNING & SCHEDULING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Construction productivity, planning, & scheduling of operations, flow charts, linear programming, critical path method (CPM), program evaluation review techniques (PERT), precedence networks. Computer methods. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in CE 5379.

 

CE5387 – CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTIVITY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Evaluation of construction project management's effectiveness. An investigation of the advanced techniques required for improvement of construction projects including time, cost, quality management, preplanning, field evaluation techniques, time-lapse photograph, safety, human factors, and communications. Prerequisite: CE 5379 and CE 5386; or consent of instructor.

 

CE5388 – PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION AND TRENCHLESS TECHNOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Pipeline and utility design, construction and renewal. Topics include pipeline infrastructure structural considerations, planning and construction considerations, pipe materials, and trenchless technologies. Credit not granted for both CE 4305 and CE 5388. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

CE5389 – PIPELINE INFRASTRUCTURE ASSET MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Pipeline infrastructure inventory, inspection, and life cycle costs. Topics include pipeline deterioration parameters, asset management technologies, risk assessment, government regulations and case studies. Credit not granted for both CE 4306 and CE 5389. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

CE5391 – ADVANCED STUDIES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Individual studies of advanced topics under the supervision of a professor or professors. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE5392 – SPECIAL TOPICS IN AIR POLLUTION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Sources, transport, fate, characterisitics, and control of air contaminants. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite:Graduate standing and consent of instructor Topic 1 - Air Pollution Chemistry and Meteorology Designed to give students an understanding of how pollutants react and travel in the atmosphere. Topics include: chemistry of ground-level ozone formation, ozone layer depletion, acid deposition, fine particle formation, and climate change; meteorological variables impacting pollutant transport in the atmosphere, such as atmospheric stability, turbulence and wind speed. Topic 2 A Air Quality Modeling Mathematical models for predicting air pollutant transport and transformation in the atmosphere, to evaluate health impacts and potential control strategies. The course covers 4 types of air quality models: box models, photochemical grid models, Gaussian dispersion models (major emphasis), and receptor models. Topic 3 A Transportation and Air Quality Generation of pollutants in gasoline and diesel engines. Emission estimation via measurement and modeling (MOBILE 6). Prediction of pollutant concentrations near roadways. Vehicle emission control using alternative engine design, alternate fuels, add-on technology. Travel demand management and transportation control measures for emission reduction. Topic 4 - Air Pollution Control System Design Design of air pollution control systems for stationary sources, including particle control technologies (cyclones, electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters and wet scrubbers) and gaseous control technologies (incinerators, adsorption systems, absorption systems, biofilters, nitrogen oxide controls, mercury controls, and carbon dioxide controls).

 

CE5395 – MASTER'S PROJECT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Non-thesis master's degree candidates with approval to include a project in their program. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Civil Engineering Graduate Advisor.

 

CE5398 – THESIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Research and preparation pertaining to the master's thesis. Graded F, R.

 

CE5695 – MASTER'S PROJECT

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Non-thesis master's degree candidates with approval to include a project in their program. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Civil Engineering Graduate Advisor.

 

CE5698 – THESIS

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Research and preparation pertaining to the master's thesis. Graded F, P, R.

 

CE6197 – RESEARCH IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Individual supervised research projects. May be repeated for credit. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Supervising Committee Chair.

 

CE6297 – RESEARCH IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Individual supervised research projects. May be repeated for credit. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Supervising Committee Chair.

 

CE6300 – ADVANCED TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Topics of current interest in the field of civil engineering. The subject title is listed in the class schedule and in the student's record. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

 

CE6306 – PUBLIC TRANSIT PLANNING & OPERATIONS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Theory and application of technologies used for transit demand analysis, routing, scheduling, evaluation, crew assignment, maintenance strategies, and management. Land-use impact on public transit policy and operation is also introduced. Prerequisite: CE 4311 or CE 5337 or equivalent.

 

CE6308 – ANALYTICAL MODELS IN TRANSPORTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Development and analysis of mathematical models in transportation. Topics include travel demand, trip generation, distribution, mode choice, assignment, plan evaluation, spatial distribution, traffic control and flow models; principles of behavioral, econometric, deterministic, probabilistic, and chaotic simulation models, and their applications. Prerequisite: CE 4311 or CE 5337.

 

CE6309 – TRAFFIC FLOW THEORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Speed, density relationships of vehicular traffic flow; statistical aspects of traffic events and queuing processes; deterministic models and simulation models of traffic flow behavior; applications of flow theory to traffic problem solutions. Prerequisite: CE 5330 or equivalent.

 

CE6311 – ADVANCED FOUNDATION DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Subsurface investigations; advanced design of mat foundations, retaining walls, reinforced retaining walls, anchor tiebacks, driven piles, and piers; destructive and nondestructive tests on deep foundations; group piles, laterally loaded piles, and design of foundations in expansive soils. Prerequisite: CE 4321 or CE 5364.

 

CE6312 – IN-SITU TESTING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Site characterization, in-situ testing procedures, and soil property interpretation methods for standard penetration tests, cone penetration tests utilizing friction cone, piezocone, and seismic cone, dilatometer, vane shear, pressure meter, and bore hole shear tests, non-destructive tests for pavement subgrade characterization. Prerequisite: CE 3143 or CE 5370 or consent of instructor.

 

CE6313 – DESIGN OF EARTH DAMS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to dams and levees, failure and damage analysis, erosion, seepage, filter, drainage design, foundation preparation for problematic subsoil conditions, seepage induced slope stability issues, desiccation crack and erosion control, numerical modeling and case studies, seismic issues. Prerequisite: CE 5367 or consent of instructor.

 

CE6314 – STORMWATER MODELING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Hydrologic modeling methods and issues, urban watershed modeling, methods of system analysis; analysis of hydrologic components as linear and nonlinear systems, watershed response, kinematic wave; and model parameters optimization. Prerequisite: CE 5346 and CE 5347; or consent of instructor.

 

CE6316 – SEDIMENT TRANSPORT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Sourcing the sediment influx, the settling velocity, Shields critical shear stress, design with critical shear, bedload transport equations, suspended load transport, total transport equation, regime theory as index of stability. Prerequisite: CE 4358 or CE 5346; and CE 5347.

 

CE6325 – ADVANCED PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The course represents the fundamentals and applications of various advanced physical and chemical unit operations and processes for controlling drinking water quality. The course will cover 1) general overview on the standard, regulations, and goals of drinking water quality, 2) detailed discussion of the theory, design, and operation of advanced physical and chemical unit processes, including but not limited to, sorption, centrifugation, osmotic pressure, membrane separation, chemical oxidation and advanced oxidation, UV technology, and disinfection, and 3) post treatment issues. Prerequisite: CE 5318 and CE 5319.

 

CE6350 – ADVANCED CONCRETE DESIGN II

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Detailing of connections for ductility demands, modified compression field theory, strut and tie modeling of systems and areas, and design of shear walls and hybrid construction. Behavior of reinforced concrete structures, with emphasis on ductility and detailing. Prerequisite: CE 5312.

 

CE6352 – ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Weak and mixed formulations; Eulerian and Lagrangian mesh formulations; plane stress and plane strain, axisymmetric element equations; two dimensional elasticity equations; 2-D and 3-D isoparametric formulations; error analysis and convergence criteria for linear/nonlinear problems; nonlinear-geometric, materials, and contact formulation; cyclic plasticity formulation. Prerequisite: CE 5303.

 

CE6354 – REPAIR AND REHABILITATION OF STRUCTURES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Causes of distress, evaluation methods for condition, strength, serviceability; repair materials, repair techniques, and quality control methods for repair of concrete. Criteria for rehabilitation; retrofit techniques for change in function, loading, and seismic forces. Prerequisite: CE 5311 and CE 5312.

 

CE6355 – EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Earthquake characteristics; design of structures to resist earthquakes. Characterization of earthquakes for design. Development of design criteria for elastic and inelastic structural response. Seismic performance of various structural systems. Prediction of nonlinear seismic behavior. Basis for code design procedures. Preliminary design of steel and reinforced concrete structures. Evaluation of earthquake vulnerability of existing structures and rehabilitation of seismic deficiencies. Prerequisite: CE 5385.

 

CE6356 – ENERGY METHODS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Principles of mechanics; elastic beams and frames; variational method: curved cantilever beams; Rayleigh Ritz method; special form of Euler equation; differential equation for beam; variation of double integral; first variation of triple integral. Deformable bodies using indicial notation; buckling using energy method; Lagrange and Hamilton Principles; theory and analysis of plates; theory and buckling; and theory of vibration. Prerequisite: CE 5315.

 

CE6357 – STRUCTURAL STABILITY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Buckling of columns; approximate method of analysis for buckling problems; beam columns; structural system stability (buckling of frames); lateral torsional buckling; buckling of plates; and buckling of axially compressed cylindrical shells. Prerequisite: CE 5303 or concurrent registration therein.

 

CE6358 – ADVANCED ENGINEERING ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to matrices; vector spaces; tensors, Eigenvalue problems. Solution to discrete systems: steady state problems and propagation problems. Solution of continuous systems: differential formulation; variational method; and weighted residual methods. Solution of linear and nonlinear static equilibrium equations. Prerequisite: CE 5315 and MATH 3319.

 

CE6359 – PLATES AND SHELLS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to differential geometry; equilibrium of plate and shell elements; equilibrium equations for shell revolutions; compound shells; nonsymmetrical loaded shell; anti-symmetrical loaded shell; membrane theory; constitutive law; analysis of plates and shells using energy method; and bending and stability of plates and shells. Prerequisite: CE 5315.

 

CE6360 – THEORY OF ELASTICITY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introductory mathematical concepts: vector calculus; tensor algebra. Theory of deformation; strain displacement relations in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems. Theory of stress; differential equation of equilibrium in curvilinear spatial coordinates; three dimensional equations of elasticity; nonlinear constitutive relationship; plane theory of elasticity; and plane elasticity in polar coordinates. Prerequisite: CE 5315.

 

CE6391 – ADVANCED PROJECTS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Projects related to advanced topics in graduate area. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Civil Engineering Graduate Advisor.

 

CE6397 – RESEARCH IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Individual supervised research projects. May be repeated for credit. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Supervising Committee Chair.

 

CE6399 – DISSERTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Preparation of a doctoral dissertation in civil engineering. Graded F, R. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

 

CE6697 – RESEARCH IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Individual supervised research projects. May be repeated for credit. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Supervising Committee Chair.

 

CE6699 – DISSERTATION

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Preparation of a doctoral dissertation in civil engineering. Graded F, R. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

 

CE6997 – RESEARCH IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Individual supervised research projects. May be repeated for credit. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Supervising Committee Chair.

 

CE6999 – DISSERTATION

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Preparation of a doctoral dissertation in civil engineering. Graded F, P, R. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

 

CE7399 – DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.