Graduate Catalog 2000 - 2002

  
192

 
The School of Nursing
Dean: Elizabeth C. Poster, Ph.D.
669 Pickard Hall Box 19407 817-272-2776 www.uta.edu/nursing 
 
 

Mission and Philosophy

   The School of Nursing, an integral component of The University of Texas at Arlington, seeks to assure health care of the highest quality for the people of Texas. The faculty believe in the promotion and support of excellence in professional nursing through teaching, scholarly endeavors and community service. Through its undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education programs, the School of Nursing is committed to prepare and develop individuals for professional nursing roles and for collaboration with other professionals and consumers in the delivery of health care.
   Learning, a continuous lifelong process, is a personal responsibility. The faculty believes students must be actively involved in the learning process to acquire clinical proficiency and to be socialized into professional roles. In nursing education, learning experiences are planned to achieve sequence, continuity and synthesis of knowledge and skills as defined by the educational objectives. The teaching and learning processes involve the teacher and learner in setting goals, selecting learning experiences, evaluating progress, and revising instructional methods and curriculum as appropriate. The educational process facilitates the development of each person's potential and reflects democratic values and ethical principles.
   Faculty and students share the responsibility for creating an educational climate that fosters mutual respect, integrity, intellectual inquiry, critical thinking, creativity, and effective communication. Faculty and students together contribute to the knowledge base of the profession through their scholarly endeavors, including the application of nursing science, conduct of research, and dissemination of knowledge through presentations and publications. Faculty and students provide service to the University and the community, promoting health through their involvement and leadership.
   Undergraduate nursing education is based upon studies in the arts, sciences and humanities, and provides a foundation for continuing personal, professional and educational development. The baccalaureate program is designed to prepare a competent, self-directed, general practitioner of nursing who can assume increasing responsibility and leadership in the delivery of nursing care.
   Graduate nursing education builds on a foundation of undergraduate nursing education and provides an opportunity for professional nurses to continue developing a specialty practice that is congruent with an expanding theoretical and empirical knowledge base. The graduate program in nursing is designed to assist professional nurses to prepare for advanced clinical and functional roles that require increased accountability, expertise and leadership. The master's program facilitates the use of the research process through the course of study and prepares the graduate to be a critical thinker and a self-directed professional who collaborates with consumers and other health care providers.
   The faculty believe that doctoral education is essential to develop and advance an empirical knowledge base for nursing as a discipline. The doctorate provides a basis for future research programs and other scholarly activities.
   Continuing education in nursing is based upon the premise that maintaining competency in nursing practice is the responsibility of

each professional nurse. The faculty believes it is the responsibility of the School of Nursing to be sensitive to the influences inherent in a changing society and to respond to the continuing educational needs of professional nurses in Texas.
   Based on a holistic perspective, the curricula of the School of Nursing educational programs encompass the major concepts of person, health, environment, and nursing. The person is defined as an individual, a family, an aggregate, a community, or a society, each having relationships with and responsibilities to the others. The person has unique environmental, physiological, psychosocial-cultural, philosophical, developmental and spiritual dimensions and possesses inherent dignity and worth. The person's unique, complex needs are communicated through a variety of behaviors across the lifespan.
   Health is a dynamic state and implies a continuous response by the person to stimuli from the environment. Health encompasses many processes: promoting and maintaining health, preventing illness, recovering from illness, and dying with dignity. Nurses are accountable for assisting persons toward health. Each person has the right to health care provided through a collaborative process, resulting in informed health decisions and shared accountability for outcomes.
   The environment consists of physiological, psychosocial-cultural, philosophical, developmental, and spiritual conditions and forces impacting the person's health. Environmental conditions and forces continually change and interact, forming a complex context for nursing practice. The nurse has the responsibility to assess the environment at the level impacting the person, manage its constraints, and utilize its resources to promote the health of the person.
   Nursing is enacted by applying the nursing process within the roles of clinician, teacher, manager, and researcher. The professional nurse functions in diverse practice settings with persons of various cultures. Within the context of a caring interpersonal relationship and guided by ethical, legal, and professional standards, the nurse uses critical thinking to apply evidence-based knowledge and skills in the management of nursing care. As an essential part of the health care delivery system, nursing is a socially determined profession whose practice evolves in response to the needs of persons. These needs provide direction for future roles of professional nursing practice.

History and Overview

   The UTA School of Nursing was established in 1971 as the U.T. System School of Nursing in Fort Worth and was housed in John Peter Smith Hospital. The first baccalaureate class enrolled in fall of 1972; the graduate program (MSN) began in 1975. In 1976, the school became an academic unit of UTA, moving to the campus in 1977.
   The Undergraduate Program consists of the BSN and the RN to BSN programs. In addition to the Arlington campus, the RN to BSN program is offered via videotape and site coordinators on the following extended campuses in the following rural areas (parenthesis indicate the year in which each program was established): Texarkana (1985 to 1995), Waco (1989), Grayson (1990), Paris (1990) and Kaufman (1996). The Graduate Program offers a Master of Science in Nursing with preparation as a nurse practitioner in the areas of Acute Care (1996), Adult (1989), Child Health/Pediatric (1985), Family (1975),

 
Graduate Catalog 2000 - 2002

  
192