Graduate Catalog 2000 - 2002

  
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The College of Engineering

Dean: Bill D. Carroll, Ph.D.
634 Nedderman Hall • Box 19019 • 817-272-2571 • http://engineering.uta.edu
 

Mission and Philosophy
   The primary objectives of the College of Engineering are to educate and prepare men and women for leadership in industry, government and educational institutions; to advance the knowledge base of the engineering professions; and to influence the future directions of engineering education and practice.
   The educational programs in the college emphasize the understanding of fundamental principles and experimental, computational and analytical methods that prepare the individual for a lifetime of learning and professional practice.

History and Overview
   The engineering program at U.T. Arlington evolved from a two-year program that was established at North Texas Agricultural College during the 1930s and 1940s. North Texas Agricultural College evolved into Arlington State College, and in 1959 approval was given to begin a four-year engineering program. In 1965, Arlington State College joined The University of Texas System as The University of Texas at Arlington, and the first master's degree program in engineering was approved. The first Ph.D. program in engineering was added in 1969. Construction of the Engineering Laboratory Building in 1977, the Engineering Annex in 1980, the Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) in 1987 and Nedderman Hall in 1988 provided much-needed classroom and research laboratory space for the continued growth of the College of Engineering. Courses are also taught at the UTA/Fort Worth Riverbend campus. These courses are transferred electronically to the Arlington campus and are taped and available on the Internet.
   With more than 2,800 students, excellent classrooms and outstanding research facilities, the College of Engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington has emerged as a major research institution with comprehensive programs in a number of areas.

Scholastic Activity and Research Interests of the Faculty
   Members of faculty of the College of Engineering have earned advanced degrees from some of the finest universities in the world. They excel in teaching, often using multimedia, computer-assisted instruction methods. Members of the faculty have widely varying research interests. They participate vigorously in local, national and international professional activities through membership in technical societies and engineering organizations. Faculty members also compete successfully for external research funding which generates support for graduate student assistants and special research facilities. They also publish extensively in the engineering and scientific journals associated with each engineering discipline. Many faculty members also have written textbooks and other scholarly publications which contribute to the advancement of knowledge and state-of-the-art practice of engineering.

Programs
   Graduate work in engineering at U.T. Arlington may lead to the master of science or doctor of philosophy in the following programs:
   Aerospace Engineering
   Biomedical Engineering
   Civil Engineering
   Computer Science and Engineering
   Electrical Engineering
   Industrial Engineering
   Mechanical Engineering

   Graduate work may also lead to a practice-oriented master's degree which usually requires a design project, report, internship or additional course work. Details are given in the individual program descriptions that follow.
   In addition, the College of Engineering offers interdisciplinary master's and doctoral programs with the College of Science in Materials Science and Engineering and in Environmental Science and Engineering. The Master of Science in Logistics and Master of Science in Management of Technology are offered in partnership with the College of Business Administration. Descriptions of these programs are in the Interdepartmental and Intercampus Programs section of this catalog.

 
Graduate Catalog 2000 - 2002

  
123