The University of Texas at Arlington: Graduate Catalog 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog 2007-2008
Note: This Catalog was published in July 2007 and supersedes the 2006-2007 Catalog.

Department of History

department web page: www.uta.edu/history/
department contact: history@uta.edu
graduate web page:
graduate contact:

Chair

Robert B. Fairbanks
202 University Hall
817.272.2861

Admission Standards | M.A. Degree Requirements | Archival Administration and Public History | Master of Education in Teaching | Ph.D. Degree Requirements | Courses

Areas of Study and Degrees

History
M.A., Ph.D.

Archival Administration
Certificate

Master's Degree Plans

Thesis and Non-Thesis

Doctoral Degree Plan

Dissertation

Graduate Advisors

Stephen Maizlish (M.A. Program)
Thomas Adam (Ph.D. Program)
201 University Hall, 817.272.2861
Fax: 817.272.2852
E-mail: history@uta.edu

Graduate Faculty

Professors

Fairbanks, Francaviglia, Green, Kyle, Palmer, Philp, Reinhartz, Richmond, Rodnitzky, Saxon

Associate Professors

Adam, Anders, Cawthon, Cole, Garrigus, Goldberg, Haynes, Jalloh, Maizlish, Morris, Narrett, Reinhardt, Treviño

Assistant Professors

Davis-Secord

Professor Emeritus

Lackner

Objectives

Graduate study in history seeks not only to train students in historical methods and analysis but also to nurture in them a sense of the excitement and relevance of studying the past. Exploring the historical diversity of human experience broadens and deepens our understanding of both the past and the contemporary world. Students who complete graduate studies in history pursue careers in teaching, research and archival or museum administration, as well as in government and business.

The Master's Degree Program offers students graduate history training in either U.S. history or the history of Europe, Africa and Latin America. In the flexible Master's degree curriculum, apart from two required courses early in the program, students tailor their course of study to meet individual interests and career objectives. Students choose either Thesis or Non-Thesis programs. Coursework and internships in Archival Administration certification and/or Public History are also available as part of the Master's degree program.

The Doctoral Degree Program in Transatlantic History offers students comparative study of the historical development of peoples on the continents bordering the Atlantic Ocean. This exciting Ph.D. program is part of recent developments within the discipline of history that broaden the study of the past, transcend national histories, and contribute to a new transnational and comparative perspective. Utilizing specific research resources in the UTA Libraries, the Ph.D. program in Transatlantic History (1492 to the present) offers a structured and focused curriculum of both required and elective courses. Prerequisite: B.A. or M.A. degree in history.

Admission Standards

In compliance with HB 1641, the History Department does not assign a specific weight to any one factor being considered, and does not use standardized tests (i.e., the GRE) in the admissions or competitive fellowship or scholarship process as the sole criterion for consideration or as the primary criterion to end consideration of an applicant to either the M.A. or Ph.D. program. However, the GRE is required and used as a criterion, without specific weight, in the Department's evaluation of candidates for admission to programs at each of three levels: Unconditional, Provisional, and Probationary Admission.

The Department wishes to be as thorough and fair as possible in evaluating applicants for admission. It recognizes that some applicants may appear to be stronger according to some criteria than according to other criteria. When an applicant does not completely meet the minimum expectations for Unconditional Admission, the Department may consider the applicant for possible Provisional or Probationary Admission. When the applicant is not granted any of the three levels of admission, the decision may be deferred or the application is denied. We do not wish to exclude a qualified and potentially successful candidate who perhaps has approached but not met all the criteria completely. However, we do not wish to admit candidates who, based on the criteria, are deemed to have a poor chance of successfully completing the graduate program.

M.A. Program

Unconditional Admission

The criteria for admission below are used, without specific weights, as positive indicators of potential success in the program. All four criteria for unconditional admission must be met in order to receive unconditional admission.

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required documentation (e.g. GRE scores have not yet arrived) prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements may be granted provisional admission. Provisionally admitted students must adequately satisfy any incomplete documentation by the end of the semester in which they are admitted. If the applicant fails to do so, the Department may then reclassify the applicant as Probationary, defer the decision, or ask the candidate to leave the program.

Probationary Admission

An applicant whose performance, according to the criteria, approximates but does not meet minimum admission standards may be granted Probationary Admission subject to one or both of the following conditions:

Deferral or Denial

If two or more of the criteria have not been met satisfactorily, the applicant will not be admitted on any of the three levels above but will receive deferral or denial. A deferred decision may be granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.

M.A. Fellowship Standards

Fellowships, when available, will be awarded on a competitive basis. Nominees for the Graduate School Master's Fellowship in History will be selected based on the following criteria:

Ph.D. Program

Unconditional Admission

The criteria for admission below are used, without specific weight, as positive indicators of potential success in the program. All criteria must be met in order to receive consideration for unconditional admission.

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required documentation (e.g., GRE scores) prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements may be granted provisional admission. Provisionally admitted students must adequately satisfy any incomplete documentation by the end of the semester in which they are admitted. If the applicant fails to do so, the Department may then reclassify the applicant as Probationary, defer the decision, or ask the candidate to leave the program.

Probationary Admission

An applicant whose credentials approximate but do not meet minimum admission standards, may be granted Probationary Admission subject to the condition that the candidate must earn no grade lower than a B in his/her first 12 semester hours of graduate work taken at UTA.

Deferral or Denial

If two or more of the criteria have not been met satisfactorily, the applicant will not be admitted on any of the three levels above but will receive deferral or denial. A deferred decision may be granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.

Application Deadline

The Ph.D. admissions committee will begin its evaluation of completed applications on February 2 and will continue to meet periodically until the Graduate School deadline of June 15. Decisions concerning fellowships and assistantships will be made beginning March 15 and will continue thereafter depending on availability.

Ph.D. Fellowship Standards

Fellowships, when available, will be awarded on a competitive basis. The criteria for Liberal Arts Special (Transatlantic) Doctoral Fellowships in History are:

M.A. Degree Requirements

Courses taken toward a master's degree should fit into a unified program aimed at providing students with both a comprehensive background and a depth of understanding in a major field in either U.S. History or the History of Europe, Africa and Latin America. All students are required to take HIST 5339 Historical Theory and Methodology and the Issues & Interpretations course corresponding to their major field (either HIST 5340 or 5341). All students must take a minimum of six hours in both the Colloquium and the Seminar courses. Master's students are eligible to take courses at the 6000 level as well as 5000 level, subject to any particular course prerequisites. Students must consult with the Graduate Advisor to determine their program.

Competency in one foreign language is required to obtain the Master's degree. This may be demonstrated by four semesters of credit in an approved language or by successful completion of an examination administered by the Department of Foreign Languages or by the History Department.

The Thesis degree plan is designed for students who wish to research and write a substantial, original work on a historical topic of personal interest. The plan requires completion of 30 credit hours (24 hours of coursework, plus 6 hours of thesis preparation). With the approval of the Graduate Advisor, thesis students may have a minor of as many as six hours of graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses in a discipline other than history. A maximum of six hours of advanced undergraduate history coursework may be taken for graduate credit. Thesis candidates should consult with the Graduate Advisor to form their thesis faculty committee, which consists of one supervising professor and two other professors.

The Non-Thesis degree plan requires completion of 36 credit hours of coursework. In the final semester, the non-thesis students are required to take HIST 5395, a course that prepares them for the written and oral comprehensive examination. With the approval of the Graduate Advisor, non-thesis students may have a minor of as many as nine hours of graduate and/or advanced undergraduate courses in a discipline other than history. A maximum of nine hours of advanced undergraduate coursework may be taken for graduate credit. A comprehensive examination (written and oral), over specific areas of concentration within the major field, is required for the degree; these areas will be defined by students in consultation with the Graduate Advisor and their non-thesis faculty committee, which consists of one supervising professor and two other professors.

Archival Administration and Public History

These studies involve application of historical knowledge and methodology in non-academic settings such as private businesses or public historical agencies (e.g., archives, museums, preservation societies).

Students desiring a certificate of archival administration as part of the Master of Arts in History degree must take HIST 5339 and HIST 5340 or HIST 5341 and HIST 5395, and enroll in 15 hours of other courses in either U.S. history or the history of Europe, Africa and Latin America. In addition, they must take HIST 5342 and HIST 5343, plus an additional six hours of internship, HIST 5644. Students already holding a M.A. or Ph.D. degree in history or a related field, as well as students enrolled in graduate programs other than history, who desire only a certificate in archival administration should consult the Graduate Advisor.

Students desiring public history as an area of study as part of the Master of Arts in History degree must take HIST 5339, HIST 5340 or HIST 5341, and HIST 5395, and also enroll in 9 hours of content courses in either U.S. history or the history of Europe, Africa and Latin America. At least 3 hours must be in both colloquium and seminar courses. In addition, students must take the following required 12 hours HIST 5342, HIST 5343, HIST 5345, and HIST 5348, plus an additional six hours of internship (HIST 5644). Students electing to complete an internship in archival management will also earn the certificate in archival administration (see above).

Students interested in either archival administration or public history as an area of study are encouraged to consult the Graduate Advisor to discuss a program of work.

Master of Education in Teaching (M.Ed.T.)

History may be chosen as an appropriate academic specialization or teaching field for students enrolled in the Master of Education in Teaching Degree Program. The History Department offers courses that qualify as an academic area or teaching field for elementary and secondary teachers. HIST 5340 and/or HIST 5341 are especially recommended for students in the M.Ed.T. program, and for others who wish to broaden their historical knowledge for classroom teaching. See Master of Education in Teaching Degree Program.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The doctoral program consists of 39 credit hours: 30 hours of coursework and 9 hours of dissertation. A total of 18 hours of the 30-hour total of coursework is on required methodological and transatlantic subjects. Of the remaining 12 hours of elective coursework, a minimum of 3 hours and a maximum of 6 hours are to be taken in a department other than history.

The Ph.D. Program in Transatlantic History has as its goal the solid grounding of graduate students in the history of the development, contact, and interaction between peoples of the continents bordering on the Atlantic Ocean. In order to achieve this goal of the comparative study of the interrelations of Europe, Africa, and the Americas, North and South, students enroll in a sequenced curriculum that offers coursework in discovery, exploration, and the history of cartography; and migrations, colonization, and comparative frontiers. Readings (colloquium) courses in specific areas are followed by research (seminar) courses in that area. Certain doctoral courses HIST 6301, 6302, 6321, 6322 may be repeated for credit when the instructor or subject changes.

During the first semester (Fall of Year I), students take three required courses. HIST 5339, Historical Theory and Methodology, trains students in basic research techniques, theories, and methodologies. HIST 6338, Issues in Transatlantic History, introduces key concepts and important issues in Transatlantic History from 1492 to the present. A third course, HIST 6301, is a colloquium on Transatlantic Exploration, Discovery and the History of Cartography. This course allows students to study in more depth subjects encountered in the overview course, HIST 6338.

(Students who hold the M.A. degree from UTA, and who have already taken HIST 5339 as part of that program's requirements, should take an elective course in place of repeating this course.)

During their second semester (Spring of Year I), students take two required courses and one elective course. The two required courses are HIST 6302 and 6321. The colloquium course, HIST 6302, Transatlantic Migrations, Colonization, and Comparative Frontiers, enables students to focus more specifically in these subject areas, which were introduced earlier in HIST 6338. In the other required course, HIST 6321, Seminar on Transatlantic Exploration, Discovery, and the History of Cartography, students conduct primary source research on subjects studied in HIST 6301, which students will have taken in the previous semester. The third course during this semester is the student's first elective course. (On Electives, see below.)

The availability of Summer courses may affect the students' remaining schedules.

During their third semester (usually Fall of Year II), students take one required course and two electives. The required course is HIST 6322, Seminar in Transatlantic Migrations, Colonization and Comparative Frontiers, a course in which students conduct primary source research in areas previously studied in HIST 6302. In addition, students enroll in two electives (see Electives).

During their fourth semester (usually Spring of Year II), students take one final elective course. Students may also enroll in an individual study course (HIST 6190, 6390, 6690 or 6990) that prepares them for the Comprehensive Examination (see Comprehensive Examination). Students are required to pass this examination before proceeding to the dissertation.

Electives

Students are reminded of the requirement of 3 hours minimum and 6 hours maximum of elective courses to be taken in a department(s) other than history. These 3-6 hours may be taken in any semester beyond the Fall of Year I. Since, overall, the Transatlantic History doctoral program requires a total of 12 hours of electives, the student enrolls in either 3 hours in non-history department courses and 9 hours in history courses, or 6 hours in non-history courses and 6 hours in history courses. The student may enroll in either 5000 or 6000 level history courses as electives.

Elective courses in the Transatlantic History Ph.D. program are defined as either inside electives, non-required history department courses, or outside electives, courses in a department other than history. With the approval of the Graduate Advisor, students may select outside electives from any graduate course in the departments of English, Foreign Languages, Political Science, and Sociology/Anthropology. A course or courses in another department must have the approval of the Graduate Advisor. Special note on inside electives: All 5000 and 6000 level history courses except HIST 5339 may be repeated for credit when the subject or instructor changes.

It is understood that both outside and inside electives should be courses that will contribute to the transatlantic focus of the student's body of work.

Foreign Language

If the student has not already fulfilled the foreign language requirement before entering the doctoral program, he/she is expected to use the first two years in the program to satisfy the foreign language requirement. The student is expected to choose a language that will be required to work on the PhD topic of his/her choice. Each student is expected to have a solid reading knowledge in at least one transatlantic language (languages of the European and African peoples other than English). The language proficiency can be demonstrated in three different ways:

  1. If the student has not already taken four semesters (from an accredited university) in a single foreign language with at least a B before being admitted to the PhD program (within10 years prior to admission), the student needs to complete four semesters in one foreign language with at least a grade of B prior to taking the Comprehensive Exam.
  2. Demonstrating proficiency in a foreign language by taking the CLEP test and scoring 71-80 in German, 68-80 in French, and 67-80 in Spanish.
  3. Taking the Reading Comprehension Exercise by an appropriate faculty member in which the student during one semester must read one monograph (about 200-300 pages) in a language other than English and submit a five-seven page summary in English, which must include up to three pages of direct translation.

The language requirement must be satisfied before the student can take the Comprehensive Exam. For the student at the dissertation stage, the candidate’s doctoral committee may require that the student demonstrates competency in a second foreign language in the same fashion as the first foreign language if that second language is judged essential for the student’s dissertation research.

Comprehensive Examination

After the student has completed all or most of the 30 hours of coursework (18 hours of required core courses and 12 hours of electives) and satisfied the language requirement, he/she, upon consultation with the Ph.D. Advisor and the Comprehensive Exam Committee, should begin preparing for the Ph.D. Comprehensive Exam. It is strongly recommended that students wait until they have completed all 30 hours of course work.

Only after the student has the approval of the Ph.D. Advisor, he/she may arrange the date of the exam in consultation with all committee members. Only then may the Request for the Comprehensive Examination form be filed with the graduate school. Please make sure to file the Request for the Comprehensive Examination in the first four weeks of the semester. (See the graduate program assistant in the History Department office to file the form.)

The Comprehensive Examination is meant to test the student's knowledge in at least three broad areas of study and is designed to determine whether the student is prepared to teach in those areas. The scope of the Comprehensive Examination should be broader than the dissertation topic. In consultation with the three principle committee members, the student must develop reading lists of key primary and secondary materials for each of the three areas of specialization.

The written portion of the exam will be taken over a period of three consecutive days, seven hours each day, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The students will be examined over one area each day. Beginning with the first morning, the student should report to the graduate program assistant in the History Department office, who will issue the student the relevant question(s) for that day’s examination. Students may use a personal computer available in the department to take their examination. They may not use texts or notes during the exam. Chairs should ensure that time-limits for individual parts of the examination are observed.

After the written exams are completed and the committee has read all three parts, students will take the oral exam (within a week of the written exam). Students must take both the written and oral exams or they will automatically fail the comprehensive exam. After the oral exam is over, the committee members will discuss the exam as a whole (written and oral). Then the committee will decided on one of the four options listed below.

A) Passed, approval and recommendation to begin dissertation research under the supervision of the committee chair.
B) Passed, approval to remain in the program upon meeting certain specified additional requirements. 
C) Failed, with permission to retake the examination after a certain period as specified by the examining committee.
D) Failed:  Recommendation not to continue in the program.

Students are required to pass this examination before they proceed to the dissertation (ABD) phase of the program.

 

Dissertation

The final stage in the student's progression to the doctoral degree in history is the dissertation. With the advice of the Graduate Advisor, students work with their supervising professor and faculty committee to complete and file a Dissertation Prospectus.

The dissertation itself must be on a transatlantic subject approved by the Graduate Advisor and the student's faculty committee. The dissertation must be the product of original research based on the critical examination and evaluation of primary sources as well as appropriate secondary materials and interpretations. After completion of the dissertation, students will defend their work in an oral examination.


The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; completing course requirements in a later semester cannot change it. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of I) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded I. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an I, the student must complete the course requirements. Enrolling again in the course in which an I was earned cannot change a grade of I. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses). The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour dissertation courses and nine-hour thesis courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either "Graded P/F/R" or "Graded R." Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate Graduate Advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled "R" Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Courses in History (HIST)

HIST5191 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 0)
For masters students pursuing independent research or study under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST5291 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (2 - 0)
For masters students pursuing independent research or study under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST5301 - COLLOQUIUM IN 19TH CENTURY U.S. HISTORY (3 - 0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues in 19th Century United States history. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST5302 - COLLOQUIUM IN 20TH CENTURY U.S. HISTORY (3 - 0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues in 20th Century United States history. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST5304 - COLLOQUIUM IN REGIONAL /TOPICAL U.S. HISTORY (3 - 0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues pertaining to a region or a major topic in the history of the U.S. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST5310 - COLLOQUIUM IN ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL HISTORY (3 - 0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues in ancient and medieval history. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST5311 - COLLOQUIUM IN PRE-1800 EUROPEAN / LATIN AMERICAN / AFRICAN HISTORY (3 - 0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues in Pre-1800 European / Latin American / African history. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST5312 - COLLOQUIUM IN POST-1800 EUROPEAN / LATIN AMERICAN / AFRICAN HISTORY (3 - 0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues in Post-1800 European / Latin American / African history. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST5313 - Colloquium in Regional / Topical European / Latin American / Aftrican History (3 - 0)
An examination of the historical literature and issues pertaining to a region or a major topic in European / Latin American / African history. The specific literature and issues examined will vary with the instructor.

HIST5321 - SEMINAR IN 19TH CENTURY U.S. HISTORY (3 - 0)
A detailed investigation of a major aspect of 19th Century United States history, involving original research and use of historical resources. The particular aspect investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5322 - SEMINAR IN 20TH CENTURY U.S. HISTORY (3 - 0)
A detailed investigation of a major aspect of 20th Century United States history, involving original research and use of historical resources. The particular aspect investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5324 - SEMINAR IN REGIONAL/TOPICAL U.S. HISTORY (3 - 0)
A detailed investigation of a major aspect of a region or a major topic in the history of the U.S., involving research and use of historical resources. The particular aspect investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5330 - SEMINAR IN ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL HISTORY (3 - 0)
A detailed investigation of a major aspect of ancient and medieval history, involving original research and use of historical resources. The particular aspect investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5331 - Seminar in Pre-1800 European / Latin American / African History (3 - 0)
A detailed investigation of a major aspect of Pre-1800 European / Latin American / African history, involving original research and use of historical resources. The particular aspect investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5332 - Seminar in Post-1800 European / Latin American / African History (3 - 0)
A detailed investigation of a major aspect of Post-1800 European / Latin American / African history, involving original research and use of historical resources. The particular aspect investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5333 - Seminar in Regional / Topical European / Latin American / African History (3 - 0)
A detailed investigation of a region or a major topic in European / Latin American / African history, involving research and use of historical resources. The particular aspect investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5338 - ISSUES WEST CIV (3 - 0)

HIST5339 - HISTORICAL THEORY AND METHODOLOGY (3 - 0)
An examination of theories of historical knowledge, the history of the discipline, various historical methodologies, and research techniques. Required for all history M.A. and Ph.D. students.

HIST5340 - ISSUES AND INTERPRETATIONS IN U.S. HISTORY (3 - 0)
A critical survey of U.S. historical scholarship from colonial times to the present. Required for all history M.A. students who are emphasizing U.S. history.

HIST5341 - ISSUES AND INTERPRETATIONS IN EUROPEAN / LATIN AMERICAN / AFRICAN HISTORY (3 - 0)
A critical survey of European / Latin American / African historical scholarship from ancient times to the present. Required for all history M.A. students who are emphasizing European / Latin American / African history.

HIST5342 - PRINCIPLES OF ARCHIVES AND MUSEUMS I (3 - 0)
The historical evolution of archival science, emphasizing the development of the archives profession, archival principles and theories, appraisal and acquisition techniques, the laws affecting archives, programming and outreach, automation, conservation and preservation, and administration of collections.

HIST5343 - PRINCIPLES OF ARCHIVES AND MUSEUMS II (3 - 0)
Training in the methods and techniques of processing archives and historical manuscripts. Focuses on the day-to-day responsibilities of archivists and curators, such as appraising, accessioning, arranging, and describing collections.

HIST5345 - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY (3 - 0)
An overview of the field of public history focusing on public historians, their work, their relationship to academic historians, their accomplishments, and the ethical principles under which they operate.

HIST5348 - TOPICS IN PUBLIC HISTORY (3 - 0)
A detailed examination of some aspect of public history (e.g. historical editing, oral history, historic preservation). The particular topic will vary with the instructor.

HIST5349 - TOPICS IN WORLD CIVILIZATION (3 - 0)
Examines subjects of immediate interest relating to world civilization not covered in other existing courses.

HIST5350 - HISTORY OF CARTOGRAPHY (3 - 0)
A history of maps and their making and cartographic documentation as a source for understanding historical development. An aspect of the history of science and technology and the history of discovery and exploration.

HIST5390 - DIRECTED STUDIES FOR MASTERS STUDENTS (3 - 0)
Directed study for masters students who have arranged to pursue specific topics of historical inquiry.

HIST5391 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 - 0)
For masters students pursuing independent research or study under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST5392 - HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE HUMANITIES (3 - 0)
An historical inquiry into problems and issues of contemporary relevance in the humanistic disciplines. The particular problems and issues investigated will vary with the instructor.

HIST5395 - NON-THESIS CAPSTONE (3 - 0)
Readings in the non-thesis student's final semester, directed by the three-person faculty committee supervising the student's program of work. Required of all non-thesis history M.A. students.

HIST5398 - THESIS (3 - 0)
For thesis history M.A. students.

HIST5644 - ARCHIVAL/PUBLIC HISTORY INTERNSHIP (6 - 0)
Work experience for either Archival or Public History students. Archival Certification: Hands-on experience in archives, records centers, or historical manuscripts repositories. Public History: Placement in a history-oriented position in a private or public agency or organization in the community.

HIST5655 - PUBLIC HISTORY INTERNSHIP (6 - 0)

HIST5691 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (6 - 0)
For masters students pursuing independent research or study under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST5698 - THESIS (6 - 0)
For thesis history M.A. students.

HIST5998 - THESIS (9 - 0)

HIST6190 - DIRECTED STUDIES FOR PhD STUDENTS (1 - 0)
Directed study for Ph.D. students who have arranged to pursue specific topics of historical inquiry.

HIST6191 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 0)

HIST6301 - COLLOQUIUM IN EXPLORATION, DISCOVERY, AND THE HISTORY OF CARTOGRAPHY (3 - 0)
A detailed examination of these topics in the context of transatlantic contacts. Employs and interprets historical maps in transatlantic context. Required for all history Ph.D. students.

HIST6302 - COLLOQUIUM IN MIGRATION, COLONIZATION, AND COMPARATIVE FRONTIERS (3 - 0)
A detailed examination of these topics in the context of transatlantic contacts and interchanges between societies in Africa, the Americas and Europe. Required for all history Ph.D. students.

HIST6321 - SEMINAR IN EXPLORATION, DISCOVERY, AND THE HISTORY OF CARTOGRAPHY (3 - 0)
A detailed research investigation into these topics in the context of transatlantic contacts. Employs maps and other primary sources to research these transatlantic topics. Required for all history Ph.D. students.

HIST6322 - SEMINAR IN MIGRATION, COLONIZATION, AND COMPARATIVE FRONTIERS (3 - 0)
A detailed research investigation into these topics in the context of transatlantic contacts and interchanges between societies in Africa, the Americas, and Europe. Employs primary sources to research these transatlantic topics. Required for all history Ph.D. students.

HIST6338 - INTRODUCTION TO TRANSATLANTIC HISTORY (3 - 0)
A critical survey of topics and issues involving contact and interchange among the peoples of the continents bordering the Atlantic Ocean. HIST 6301 and 6302 explore these themes in greater depth. Required for all history Ph.D. students.

HIST6390 - DIRECTED STUDIES FOR PhD STUDENTS (3 - 0)
Directed study for Ph.D. students who have arranged to pursue specific topics of historical inquiry.

HIST6391 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 - 0)
For history Ph.D. students.

HIST6395 - ISS IN WEST CIV (3 - 0)

HIST6399 - DISSERTATION (3 - 0)

HIST6690 - DIRECTED STUDIES FOR PhD STUDENTS (6 - 0)
Directed study for Ph.D. students who have arranged to pursue specific topics of historical inquiry.

HIST6691 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (6 - 0)
For history Ph.D. students.

HIST6699 - DISSERTATION (6 - 0)

HIST6990 - DIRECTED STUDIES FOR PhD STUDENTS (9 - 0)
Directed study for Ph.D. students who have arranged to pursue specific topics of historical inquiry.

HIST6991 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (9 - 0)
For history Ph.D. students.

HIST6999 - DISSERTATION (9 - 0)

Top^

2007 The University of Texas at Arlington