UTA home page The University of Texas at Arlington Graduate Catalog 2005-2006
Graduate Catalog 2005-2006
     Note: This Catalog was published in July 2005 and supersedes the 2004-2006 Catalog.      
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Program in Science Education

department web page: www.uta.edu/cos/
department contact: cos.uta.edu/cos/Contact/contact.html
graduate web page: cos.uta.edu/MAIS/
graduate contact: greg@hale.uta.edu

Director

Greg Hale
206 Life Science
817.272.3807

Admission | Degree Requirements | Elementary Science Certificate | Courses

Areas of Study and Degrees

Interdisciplinary Science
M.A.

Master's Degree Plan

Non-Thesis

Graduate Advisor

Edward T. Morton
206 Life Science 817.272.2309

Graduate Faculty

Professors

Neill, Wickham

Associate Professor

Epperson

Objective

The Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Science program is designed to strengthen and update the knowledge and skills necessary to teach science at the elementary, middle school, or secondary level. The MAIS degree is intended to help prepare teachers who desire certification in science, teachers who may wish to expand their knowledge of specific science disciplines, or those who wish to update their knowledge in rapidly changing science disciplines. Traditional masters degrees focus on classes in a single science department and encourage mastery of material in a sub specialty within the discipline. A thesis involving scientific research in the area of specialization is usually encouraged. In contrast, the MAIS program allows students to explore two areas of interest, and the courses are designed to provide an overview of current knowledge in each field. Since this is not a research-oriented degree, no thesis is required.

The content of the required courses was developed to contain material consistent with TEKS requirements and to provide as much replicable laboratory experience as possible. While these classes are drawn from the foundational classes in each discipline, they are designed to cover the areas in greater depth, deal with historical aspects of the topics not covered in undergraduate classes, and focus on teaching and laboratory methodologies.

Admission

Unconditional

Students applying for unconditional admission to the MAIS program must meet the general graduate school admission requirements as outlined in the graduate catalog.

Admission as Special Student

Students may apply for admission to the MAIS program as a "special student." Special student admission will allow an individual to enroll for 9 credit hours of MAIS coursework. Upon completion of 9 credit hours, the student must apply for unconditional admission to the MAIS program and pay an additional $30 application fee. If the applicant has completed 9 credit hours of coursework with a 3.0 or higher, the completed coursework will substitute for the GRE examination.

Degree Requirements

The MAIS degree is a 36 credit hour, non-thesis degree. Beginning students are encouraged to enroll in Contemporary Science, SCIE 5301, and students completing the degree enroll in a Capstone Science Seminar, SCIE 5302. These two courses constitute the science core. Students will select two areas of concentration from biology, chemistry, geology, mathematics, and physics. Each concentration will consist of four 3 credit hour courses for a total of 12 credit hours each. The remaining six credit hours may be taken as unrestricted electives. Students must file a degree plan approved by the graduate advisor prior to graduation.

Elementary Science Certificate

Program Objective

A twelve credit hour Elementary Science Certificate is offered for elementary science teachers who wish to enhance their background in science education. It is critical for elementary school students to build a foundation in science to prepare them for more advanced concepts in middle school and high school. The certificate program will give elementary teachers the knowledge and skills necessary to work with their students in establishing the science foundation necessary for mastery of the material.Classes to complete the Elementary Science Certificate should be selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the certificate program requires an application for unconditional admission to the Graduate School, completion of a bachelorís degree, and a 3.0 GPA in the last sixty (60) hours of study.

Required Courses:

SCIE 5303 Teaching and Learning: Scientific Inquiry
SCIE 5304 Special Topics in Science I
SCIE 5305 Special Topics in Science II
SCIE 5392 Selected Topics In Science


The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; completing course requirements in a later semester cannot change it. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of X) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded X. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an X, the student must complete the course requirements. Enrolling again in the course in which an X was earned cannot change a grade of X. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses). The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour thesis courses and nine-hour dissertation courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either "Graded P/F/R" or "Graded R." Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate Graduate Advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled "R" Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Courses in Science (SCIE)

SCIE 5192. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE (3-0)
Topics in science not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as different topics are offered

SCIE 5292. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE Topics in science not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as different topics are offered

SCIE 5301. CONTEMPORARY SCIENCE (3-0)
This class will review modern topical areas in contemporary science from a broadly multidisciplinary view. Readings from popular and scientific journals will be combined with lectures from different disciplines, to review the newest science innovations. Materials presented will familiarize students with current research, major breakthroughs in various fields, and the foundational science behind the discoveries. Topics covered should enrich K-12 science curricula and help teachers to address student questions about breaking science news. This class is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in the College of Science.

SCIE 5302. Capstone Science Seminar (3-0)
The Capstone Science Seminar is an intensive research and discussion class that will focus on new studies in science education and practice. Students in the M.A. in Science program should take this class in the last semester of study. This class will include a research project relevant to science education, and formal presentation of the research. This class is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in the College of Science

SCIE 5303. TEACHING AND LEARNING: SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY (3-0)
Scientific inquiry refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on the evidence derived from their work. This course explores inquiry as it refers to the activities of students in which they develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, as well as an understanding of how scientists study the natural world

SCIE 5304. Special Topics in Science I (3-0)
Seminar on significant research in science. Topics are selected with the assistance of the instructor and may include both pure and applied science

SCIE 5305. Special Topics in Science II (3-0)
Seminar on significant research in science. Topics are selected with the assistance of the instructor may include both pure and applied science

SCIE 5307. INTEGRATED PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY: CHEMISTRY (3-0)
This integrated study of physics and chemistry fundamental chemical principles including atomic structure, chemical bonding, the periodic table, nomenclature, kinetic theory, gas laws, chemical equations, and solutions.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

SCIE 5308. INTEGRATED PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY: PHYSICS (3-0)
This integrated study of physics and chemistry includes force and motion, waves and thermodynamics, energy transformations, quantum physics, and atomic structure.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

SCIE 5392. SELECTED TOPICS IN SCIENCE Topics in science not treated in the regular curriculum. Topic, format, and prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as different topics are offered

Courses in Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 5371. CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3-0)
The course focuses on the chemical and molecular basis of life, including metabolism, cell structure and function and genetics. This class is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Biology.

BIOL 5372. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF ORGANISMS (3-0)
The study of structure and function on plants and animals. Topics to be covered include structure at the level of the cell, tissue, organ and individual, growth, transport/circulation/gas exchange, nutrition, reproduction, development, endocrinology, and animal neural regulation. This class is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Biology.

BIOL 5373. EVOLUTION, ECOLOGY, AND BIODIVERSITY (3-0)
Reviews three significant aspects of organismal biology and presents current hypotheses concerning the origin and diversification of life on Earth. The ecological and behavioral interactions between organisms and their biotic/abiotic environments are considered from an evolutionary perspective. This class is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Biology.

BIOL 5374. LABORATORY PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY (2-2)
Laboratory experiments related to fundamental principles covered in BIOL 5371 and 5372. This course will utilize labs designed by Master Biology Teachers. These will be supplemented by labs published by the National Association of Biology Teachers, and various biology publishers. This class is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Biology.

Courses in Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 5355. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY (3-0)
The fundamentals of atomic structure, chemical bonding, the periodic table, nomenclature, kinetic theory, gas laws, chemical equations, and solutions. The course will be supplemented with laboratory demonstrations devoted to chemical problem- solving, library and Internet resources, chemical ethics, etc. This course is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry.

CHEM 5356. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY Study of advanced atomic structure and bonding concepts, acid-base theory, kinetics and equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, the chemistry of some elements. The courses will be supplemented with laboratory demenstrations devoted to chemical problem solving, library and internet resources, chemical ethics etc. This course is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credict for M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry.

CHEM 5357. INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY Survey of organic and biochemistry with emphasis on application to the human body. Organic functional groups and nomenclature, organic reactions, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, metabolism, and nucleic acid. This course is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credict for M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry.

CHEM 5358. LABORATORY PROBLEMS IN CHEMISTRY (1-4)
Experiments related to fundamental principles covered in CHEM 5355 and 5356. Volumetric and gravimetric determinations and qualitative analysis. This course is intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry.

Courses in Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 5330. EARTH SYSTEMS, PART I (3-0)
A. review of Earth materials and their chemistry Earth structure and geologic time, followed by a detailed discussion of the Plate Tectonic System, the hydrologic System and their interaction in weathering and erosion, sedimentation and landscape development. Laboratory demonstrations will include identification of earth materials, estimating plate motions, location of earthquake epicenters, flood frequency and groundwater discharge. These classes are intended for M.A. In Science majors and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in geology.

GEOL 5331. EARTH SYSTEMS, PART II (3-0)
A detailed discussion of the atmosphere system, oceanic systems, and biologic systems and their history. A summary discussion of the interaction of Earth Systems for an understanding of process that have formed and continue to form the Planet Earth. Laboratory demonstrations will include weather forecasting, ocean currents, sea level change, and fossil identification. These classes are intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in geology. Prerequisite: admission into the M.A. in Science program.

GEOL 5332. EARTH RESOURCES AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3-0)
A detailed discussion of resources that support life: Atmosphere, water, soil, minerals and materials, and energy; the use of those resources and the effect on the environment and global change; and the relation between population, resource distribution and availability, and environmental pollution. These classes are intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in geology. Prerequisite: 5330, 5331, and admission into the M.A. in Science Program.

GEOL 5335. LABORATORY METHODS AND TECHNIQUES (2-3)
Methods and techniques used to identify minerals, rocks and fossils; maps and mapping of geological data; recognition of landslides; flood frequency and erosion processes of river and streams; location of earthquakes.These classes are intended for M.A. in Science majors, and may not be taken for credit for the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in geology. Prerequisite: GEOL 5330, 5331 and admission into the M.A. in Science Program.

Courses in Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 5333. LINEAR ALGEBRA AND MATRICES (3-0)
Liner spaces, linear transformations, vector norms, Gaussian elimination, Jordan form, eigenvalues, quadratic forms, and related topics.
Prerequisite: MATH 3330 or consent of instructor.

MATH 5336. CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN NUMBER THEORY (3-0)
Topics include mathematical induction, fundamental theorem or arithmetic, inequalities, special sequences and sums, divisibility properties, greatest common divisor, division and Euclidean algorithm, properties of congruence and Diophantine equations.

MATH 5337. CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN CALCULUS (3-0)
Topics studied include limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, numerical approximations, applications and Taylor series.

MATH 5340. CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (3-0)
Topics include functions, mathematical induction, principles of counting, combinatorics, sequences and recurrence relations, and finite graph theory.

MATH 5341. CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN GEOMETRY (3-0)
Selected materials from geometry.

MATH 5342. CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN ALGEBRA (3-0)
Selected materials from algebra.

MATH 5343. CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (3-0)
Consideration of (1) exploring data: descriptive statistics of situations involving one and two variables; (2) anticipating patterns: probability and simulation; (3) design of experiments and planning a study; (4) statistical inference: confirming models. Use of a graphing calculator and other appropriate technology.

MATH 5345. CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES IN ANALYSIS (3-0)
Selected materials from analysis including concepts and topics consistent with precalculus and elementary calculus.

Courses in Physics (PHYS)

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