UTA home page The University of Texas at Arlington Graduate Catalog 2005-2006
Graduate Catalog 2005-2006
     Note: This Catalog was published in July 2005 and supersedes the 2004-2006 Catalog.      
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Department of Philosophy and Humanities

department web page: www.uta.edu/philosophy/
department contact: williford@uta.edu
graduate web page: www.uta.edu/philosophy/graduate.php
graduate contact: hekman@uta.edu

Chair

Dr. Kenneth Williford
305 Carlisle Hall
817.272.0505
williford@uta.edu

Courses: PHIL, GREK, LATN, CLAS

Area of Study and Degrees

Humanities
M.A.
(See Program in Humanities)

Graduate Faculty

Associate Professors

Baker, Bradshaw, Burgess-Jackson, Chiasson, Nussbaum, Reeder

Objective

The graduate course offerings in philosophy and classics are provided to support other graduate programs, particularly those in Humanities and in the Social Sciences, and to meet the expressed needs of students. The courses are designed to provide the theoretical background necessary to the complete understanding and use of professional skills in these areas. No program leading to a graduate degree in philosophy exists at this time. Philosophy is a possible area of concentration in the Graduate Humanities Program.


The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; completing course requirements in a later semester cannot change it. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of X) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded X. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an X, the student must complete the course requirements. Enrolling again in the course in which an X was earned cannot change a grade of X. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses). The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour thesis courses and nine-hour dissertation courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either "Graded P/F/R" or "Graded R." Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate Graduate Advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled "R" Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Courses in Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 5391. CONFERENCE COURSE IN PHILOSOPHY
Prerequisite: May be taken only with the permission of the instructor and the Graduate Advisor.

PHIL 5392. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY (3-0)
Consideration in depth of the work of a single philosopher or a related philosophical school against the background of the development of philosophy. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

PHIL 5393. PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE HUMANITIES<span style="display:none;"> (topics)< (3-0)
A philosophical inquiry into problems and issues of relevance in humanistic disciplines. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

Courses in Greek (GREK)

GREK 5391. CONFERENCE COURSE IN GREEK
Prerequisite: May be taken only with the permission of the instructor and the Graduate Advisor.

Courses in Latin (LATN)

LATN 5301. INTENSIVE LATIN FOR READING I (3-0)
Covers approximately the same material as LATN 1441/1442 (Levels I and II).

LATN 5302. INTENSIVE LATIN FOR READING II (3-0)
Covers approximately the same material as LATN 2313/2314 (Levels III and IV).

LATN 5391. CONFERENCE COURSE IN LATIN May be taken only with the permission of the instructor and the Graduate Advisor.

Courses in Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 5392. TOPICS IN CLASSICAL STUDIES (3-0)
Studies in the social, political and cultural systems of the ancient Greeks and Romans, including their influence upon subsequent societies. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

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