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The University of Texas at Arlington
Vol LXXXVII - July 2004
Graduate Catalog 2004-2006
 
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     Note: This Catalog is superseded by the 2005-2006 Catalog.

The College of Nursing

Dean: Elizabeth Poster, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN

669 Pickard Hall | Box 19407 | 817.272.2776 | www.uta.edu/nursing/

Special Programs and Opportunities | MSN Admission Requirements | MSN Degree Requirements | Nursing Certificates | Cooperative Programs | Dual or Joint Degree Programs | Ph.D. in Nursing| Ph.D. Admission Requirements | Ph.D. Degree Requirements | Courses: NURS

Mission and Philosophy

The School of Nursing, an integral component of The University of Texas at Arlington, seeks to assure health care of the highest quality for the people of Texas. The faculty believe in the promotion and support of excellence in professional nursing through teaching, scholarly endeavors and community service. Through its undergraduate, graduate and continuing education programs, the School of Nursing is committed to prepare and develop individuals for professional nursing roles and for collaboration with other professionals and consumers in the delivery of health care.

Learning, a continuous lifelong process, is a personal responsibility. The faculty believes students must be actively involved in the learning process to acquire clinical proficiency and to be socialized into professional roles. In nursing education, learning experiences are planned to achieve sequence, continuity and synthesis of knowledge and skills as defined by the educational objectives. The teaching and learning processes involve the teacher and learner in setting goals, selecting learning experiences, evaluating progress, and revising instructional methods and curriculum as appropriate. The educational process facilitates the development of each person's potential and reflects democratic values and ethical principles.

Faculty and students share the responsibility for creating an educational climate that fosters mutual respect, integrity, intellectual inquiry, critical thinking, creativity, and effective communication. Faculty and students together contribute to the knowledge base of the profession through their scholarly endeavors, including the application of nursing science, conduct of research, and dissemination of knowledge through presentations and publications. Faculty and students provide service to the University and the community, promoting health through their involvement and leadership.

Undergraduate nursing education is based upon studies in the arts, sciences and humanities, and provides a foundation for continuing personal, professional and educational development. The baccalaureate program is designed to prepare a competent, self-directed, general practitioner of nursing who can assume increasing responsibility and leadership in the delivery of nursing care.

Graduate nursing education builds on a foundation of undergraduate nursing education and provides an opportunity for professional nurses to continue developing a specialty practice that is congruent with an expanding theoretical and empirical knowledge base. The graduate program in nursing is designed to assist professional nurses to prepare for advanced clinical and functional roles that require increased accountability, expertise and leadership. The master's program facilitates the use of the research process through the course of study and prepares the graduate to be a critical thinker and a self-directed professional who collaborates with consumers and other health care providers.

The faculty believe that doctoral education is essential to develop and advance an empirical knowledge base for nursing as a discipline. The doctorate provides a basis for future research programs and other scholarly activities.

Continuing education in nursing is based upon the premise that maintaining competency in nursing practice is the responsibility of each professional nurse. The faculty believes it is the responsibility of the School of Nursing to be sensitive to the influences inherent in a changing society and to respond to the continuing educational needs of professional nurses in Texas.

Based on a holistic perspective, the curricula of the School of Nursing educational programs encompass the major concepts of person, health, environment, and nursing. The person is defined as an individual, a family, an aggregate, a community, or a society, each having relationships with and responsibilities to the others. The person has unique environmental, physiological, psychosocial-cultural, philosophical, developmental and spiritual dimensions and possesses inherent dignity and worth. The person's unique, complex needs are communicated through a variety of behaviors across the lifespan.

Health is a dynamic state and implies a continuous response by the person to stimuli from the environment. Health encompasses many processes: promoting and maintaining health, preventing illness, recovering from illness, and dying with dignity. Nurses are accountable for assisting persons toward health. Each person has the right to health care provided through a collaborative process, resulting in informed health decisions and shared accountability for outcomes.

The environment consists of physiological, psychosocial-cultural, philosophical, developmental, and spiritual conditions and forces impacting the person's health. Environmental conditions and forces continually change and interact, forming a complex context for nursing practice. The nurse has the responsibility to assess the environment at the level impacting the person, manage its constraints, and utilize its resources to promote the health of the person.

Nursing is enacted by applying the nursing process within the roles of clinician, teacher, manager, and researcher. The professional nurse functions in diverse practice settings with persons of various cultures. Within the context of a caring interpersonal relationship and guided by ethical, legal, and professional standards, the nurse uses critical thinking to apply evidence-based knowledge and skills in the management of nursing care. As an essential part of the health care delivery system, nursing is a socially determined profession whose practice evolves in response to the needs of persons. These needs provide direction for future roles of professional nursing practice.

History and Overview

The UTA School of Nursing was established in 1971 as the U.T. System School of Nursing in Fort Worth and was housed in John Peter Smith Hospital. The first baccalaureate class enrolled in fall of 1972; the graduate program (MSN) began in 1975. In 1976, the school became an academic unit of UTA, moving to the campus in 1977.

The Undergraduate Program consists of the BSN and the RN to BSN programs. In addition to the Arlington campus, the RN to BSN program is offered via videotape on five extended campuses (parenthesis indicates the year in which each program was established): four rural sites of Paris (1990); Waco (1989); Kaufman (1996); and Denison (1990) and two urban sites at the University of North Texas System Center in South Dallas (2001) and Texas Health Resources in Dallas and Fort Worth (2004). The Graduate Program offers a Master of Science in Nursing with preparation as a nurse practitioner in the areas of Acute Care (1996), Adult (1989), Emergency (2004), Family (1975), Gerontology (1984), Pediatric (1985) and Psychiatric-Mental Health (1995). Post-master's certificates are available in all the above nurse practitioner specialties and also as an Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (2002) and Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner (2005). In addition, the UTA Graduate Nursing Program offers preparation in Nursing Administration (1985). Additional certificates are offered in the following areas: Nurse Educator (2001), Advanced Nurse Educator (2001) and Registered Nurse First Assistant (2003). The school began offering a professional field in nursing as part of the Ph.D. in Urban and Public Administration in 1996. A Ph.D. in Nursing was approved in April 2003 with classes beginning in Fall 2003. The Ph.D. program includes two portfolio areas of study: 1) Academic Role Development and 2) Clinical Research.

Accreditation

The Master of Science in Nursing degree program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). An annually updated source for the program's required tuition, fees and program length is NLNAC, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006 (telephone: 212-363-5555, Ext. 153 or 800-669-1656, Ext. 153). There are no accrediting agencies for nursing programs at the doctoral level.

Scholastic Activities and Research Interests of the Faculty

The research programs of the School of Nursing faculty are diverse. A sampling of their areas of study includes Hispanic health care (Dr. Mary Lou Bond); effects of colon cleansing/ gastroenterology (Dr. Marilee Schmelzer); nursing care outcomes (Dr. Carolyn L. Cason); chemical dependency and abuse (Drs. Cheryl Anderson and Diane Snow); care of persons with HIV disease and AIDS (Dr. Jennifer Gray); sickle cell disease (Dr. Phyllis Adams); cancer (Dr. Nancy Burns); care of the elderly (Drs. Melinda Hiemenz and Barbara Raudonis); palliative care (Dr. Mary Jo Perley); nursing informatics (Dr. Pat Turpin); leadership and management (Dr. Sharon Judkins); effects of illness on cognitive function (Dr. Mary Schira); health services research (Drs. Susan K. Grove and Reni Courtney); noise in critical care unit (Dr. Wendy Barr); educational research (Dr. Lorrie Hegstad); and outcomes in psychiatric nursing (Dr. Elizabeth Poster); neonatology and very low birth weight (Dr. Judy LeFlore); quality of life, spirituality and GI nursing topics (Dr. Kathy Wright); character development among youth (Dr. Susan Rugari); and chronic mental illness (Dr. Mary Weber).

Special Programs and Opportunities

Learning Resources Center

Director: Dee Dee Freeman
The mission of the Center is to provide both undergraduate and graduate students a place to develop, refine, and apply knowledge in the clinical practice of skills. Computer labs are available for student use. Faculty are provided resources to support classroom instruction, clinical learning activities, and scholarly endeavors. Human patient simulation manikins are integrated into teaching.

Center for Nursing Research

Associate Dean for Research: Dr. Carolyn Cason
Research is an important component of the professional role in the School of Nursing. The Center provides research support services to faculty and students: identifying funding sources; developing competitive proposals; writing grant applications; retrieving literature; collecting, entering and analyzing data; and disseminating research results. Collaborative relationships for research with Metroplex health care agencies are in place.

Center for Psychopharmacology Education and Research

Directors: Dr. Diane Snow and Dr. Mary Weber
This Center is committed to advancing the knowledge of psychopharmacology and related neurosciences. The Center promotes the acquisition of this knowledge through education of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) and other health care professionals.

Center for Hispanic Studies in Nursing and Health

Director: Dr. Mary Lou Bond
The Center is dedicated to fostering understanding between health care professionals and people of Hispanic/Latin American origin for the purpose of increasing understanding of health and healing through research of individual experience, cultural meanings and the structure of institutions as important variables influencing health outcomes. The Center is also committed to the provision of educational programs and services which will assist health care providers to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to deliver increasingly culturally sensitive and competent care. The Center promotes interdisciplinary and interuniversity collaboration as a strategy for development of resources to solve or deal with bicultural issues facing health care professionals.

Rural Health Outreach Program

Director: Nancy Willson, RN, JD
The purpose of the Center is to provide appropriate, affordable, accessible continuing education to the nursing staffs of acute care and psychiatric hospitals, long term care facilities, home health agencies, and other health care facilities in the rural communities of North Central Texas.

Center for Continuing Nursing Education

Director: Buddy Herrington, RN, MSN
The mission of this Center is to provide quality continuing nursing education for the improvement of nursing practice and health care in North Texas. The program strives to be a regional center for the advancement of professional continuing nursing education and to meet the diverse needs of nurses in most every clinical specialty and all levels of functional roles.

Center for Leadership in Nursing and Health Care

Director: Dr. Patricia Turpin
The Center's mission is to provide students, faculty, nurse executives, managers and clinicians working in all types of health care settings the educational resources and specific programs to develop leadership skills complementary to the formal curricula of schools of nursing.

Programs

Major Areas of Study for MSN

Nursing Administration
Nurse Practitioner Programs

Acute Care Nursing
Adult Nursing
Emergency Nursing
Family Nursing
Gerontology Nursing
Pediatric Nursing
Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing (Adult or Family)

Major Areas of Study for Ph.D. in Nursing

Academic Role Development
Clinical Research

Nursing

www.uta.edu/nursing

Degrees in Nursing:

MSN
Ph.D.

Master's Degree Plans

Thesis and Non-Thesis

Doctoral Degree Plan

Dissertation

Dean

Elizabeth C. Poster
669 Pickard Hall, 817-272-2776

Assistant Dean of Masters in Nursing and Graduate Advisor

Susan K. Grove
604 Pickard Hall, 817-272-2776

Interim Associate Dean of Ph.D. in Nursing and Graduate Advisor

Mary Lou Bond
518 Pickard Hall, 817-272-5295

Graduate Faculty

Professors

Bond, Burns, Cason, Grove, Poster

Associate Professors

Courtney, Gibson, Hegstad, O'Quinn, Raudonis, Schmelzer

Assistant Professors

Anderson, Gray, Judkins, Snow, Weber, Wright

Associate Clinical Professors

Barr, Rugari, Schira

Assistant Clinical Professors

Adams, Baker, Carlson, Drinkard, Handy, Keeling, LeFlore, Miller, Perley, Turpin, Willson

Clinical Instructors

Carlson, Davis, Fowler, Gariota, Gillman, Goller, Keeling, McLean, Parker, Patrick, Simpson, Wyrick

MSN Admissions Requirements

The applicant for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree must meet the general requirements of the Graduate School and have a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree from a program accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) or proof of equivalent education at a foreign institution. Individual consideration may be given to applicants who hold a BSN degree from non-accredited programs and to applicants with baccalaureate degrees in other areas.

Potential students must also possess a current unencumbered Texas RN license for admission.

The School of Nursing admission criteria are detailed in the table on the next page. The admission status options are described, with a grade point average (GPA) and graduate record exam (GRE) ratio provided to clarify probationary and unconditional admission requirements.

Unconditional Admission

See the MSN Graduate Admission Table below.
Criteria for unconditional admission status are designated in the table on the next page.

Probationary Admission

See the MSN Graduate Admission Table below.
Criteria for probationary admission status and the GPA-GRE ratio are listed on the next page. When on probation, students can make no grade lower than a B in their first 12 semester hours of graduate coursework.

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements will be granted provisional admission.

Deferred Status

Deferred decision is granted when a file is incomplete or when a denial decision is not appropriate.

Denial of Admission

An applicant will be denied admission if they have less than satisfactory performance on a majority of admission criteria listed in the table on the next page.

MSN Graduate Admission Table

Admission Criteria Unconditional Probationary
GPA on last 60 hours of Undergraduate Program (BSN) (as calculated by Graduate School of UTA) 3.3 3.0[1] 2.8-2.99
GRE[2] Two highest GRE scores will be used in admission process. Waived[3] Verbal: ≥500 score
or
Quantitative: ≥500 score
or
Analytical Writing: ≥4
Analytical: ≥500
Verbal: 400-490[4]
or
Quantitative: 400-490[4]
or Analytical Writing: 3.0-3.5[4]
Analytical: 400-490[4]
(based on GPA/GRE ratio)
GMAT Required for MSN/MBA Dual Degree GPA x 200 + GMAT score = Minimum 1080 See MBA Advisor
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or TSE (Test of Spoken English) 550 on paper-based test or 213 on computer-based test (TOEFL) or Score of 40 or higher (TSE)
3 letters of recommendation Evaluated by Associate Dean and Program Director of MSN Program
Two years clinical experience recommended Evaluated by Associate Dean and Program Director of MSN Program
Essay Evaluated by Associate Dean and Program Director of MSN Program
Unencumbered RN License in Texas Evaluated by Associate Dean and Program Director of MSN Program
BSN from NLNAC or CCNE Accredited Program Evaluated by Associate Dean and Program Director of MSN Program
Statistics Minimum grade of "C"
Physical Assessment for Nurse Practitioner Applicants Current within last three years (course or continuing education program)
Computer expertise for Nursing Administration applicants Evaluated by Director of Nursing Administration

 

[1] Minimum undergraduate GPA requirement for unconditional admission is a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

[2] Verbal, Quantitative and Analytical Writing GRE scores will be reviewed and the two highest scores will be considered for admission process. Rationale: The three GRE scores have similar correlations (r = .3 — .4) with the UTA MSN graduates' GPA. Thus, the scores seem to have similar ability to predict success in graduate study. The Graduate Studies Committee (GSC) in Nursing approved that the two highest GRE scores be considered for the admission process, allowing the student some flexibility in the admission process.

[3] GRE Waiver Rationale: Graduate Faculty and Graduate Advisors have noted that students with a GPA of 3.3 or greater are more successful in the graduate nursing program than those with GPAs less than 3.3. Research literature strongly correlates undergraduate GPA in professional courses (last 60 hours) of BSN with success in Graduate Nursing Programs. GSC in Nursing approved waiver of GRE with 3.3 GPA on last 60 hours of undergraduate program.

[4] Students not meeting GPA/GRE ratio will be reviewed by a committee of Chair of the GSC in Nursing, Graduate Advisor, Director of Program student has selected for study and a Core Faculty. The committee will review the following: GPA; GRE scores (verbal, analytical/analytical writing and quantitative); letters of recommendation; TOEFL (if applicable); essay; and statistics grade. An applicant who performs successfully on a majority of these criteria will be admitted on probation. The committee will make a final admission decision and document that decision for the student record.

GPA-GRE Ratio

Probationary Admission

GPA
Verbal
Quantitative
Analytical Writing or Analytical
3.2 400-490 400-490 400-490 or 3.0-3.5
3.1 410-490 410-490 410-490 or 3.0-3.5
3.0 420-490 420-490 420-490 or 3.0-3.5
2.9 ≥430 ≥430 ≥430 and ≥3.5
2.8 ≥440 ≥440 ≥440 and ≥3.5

 

Admission Policy for Individuals Ineligible to Continue Graduate Study at Another University: If potential students are ineligible to continue graduate study at another university and apply to the University of Texas at Arlington Graduate Nursing Program, we recommend that they be reviewed by a committee. The committee will be composed of: 1) Director of the Program they wish to study, 2) Representative core faculty, and 3) Graduate Advisor. The committee will make their recommendation for admission or denial based on the following: 1) Admission materials (GPA on the last 60 hours of BSN, graduate GPA, GRE scores, grade of C or higher on statistics, letters of recommendation, essay, and TOEFL score if applicable); 2) a narrative statement from the potential student providing a rationale for their ineligibility at another university; and 3) a plan for successful study at U.T. Arlington. The committee reserves the right to ask for additional materials as are needed. The committee will make its recommendation of admission or denial to the Graduate Office for the University.

MSN Fellowship Criteria

Fellowship selection will be based on the highest GPA in the last 60 hours of BSN. Candidates for fellowships must meet the following criteria:

  1. New students admitted to U.T. Arlington in the fall semester.
  2. Have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 hours of their BSN.
  3. Maintain 3.0 GPA in graduate credit hours while receiving the fellowship.
  4. Enrolled in a minimum of 6 semester hours in the long semesters.

MSN Degree Requirements

Students are required to have each semester's planned program approved by the Graduate Advisor prior to registration. A minimum of 36 semester hours, thesis or non-thesis option, is required for the degree. Three to six semester hours of elective coursework that supports the selected nursing study area are required and must be approved by the Graduate Advisor prior to registration. Students selecting nurse practitioner preparation in Acute Care Nursing, Adult Nursing, Emergency Nursing, Family Nursing, Gerontological Nursing, Pediatric Nursing, or Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing and electing the thesis option are required to complete 51-54 semester hours for the degree depending on area of study. Students selecting Adult Nursing, Emergency Nursing, Family Nursing, Pediatric Nursing or Gerontological Nursing must select Nurse Practitioner as their functional area.

All non-thesis candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Nursing shall pass a written examination (comprehensive exams) or complete a scholarly project (master's completion project) as determined by the School of Nursing. All thesis candidates for the degree of Master of Science in Nursing shall present the completed thesis in a final oral examination.

MSN students must complete hours in required courses, nursing specialty area, functional role and elective(s).

MSN Required Courses

NURS 5327. Analysis of Theories for Nursing
NURS 5301. Research in Nursing
NURS 5328. Theory and Research Application in Nursing

MSN Nursing Specialty Areas

Each student must complete the required courses in at least one nursing specialty area:

Nursing Administration
NURS 5339, 5340, 5341, 5342, 5382

Nurse Practitioner Programs
Acute Care: NURS 5303, 5305, 5314, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5435, 5436, 5631
Adult: NURS 5303, 5305, 5313, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5420, 5421 or 5546, 5631
Emergency: NURS 5303, 5305, 5306, 5314, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5433, 5434, 5631
Family: NURS 5303, 5305, 5306, 5313, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5420, 5431, 5631
Gerontological Nursing: NURS 5303, 5305, 5313, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5420, 5422 or 5546, 5631
Pediatric: NURS 5303, 5306, 5313, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5442, 5444, 5631
Psychiatric-Mental Health (Adult): NURS 5303, 5305, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5424, 5425, 5631
Psychiatric-Mental Health (Family): NURS 5303, 5305, 5306, 5315, 5334, 5418, 5424, 5425, 5631

MSN Functional Role

Each student must complete the required courses in at least one functional role as designated by their degree plan:

Administration: NURS 5311, 5343
Nurse Practitioner: NURS 5350
Educator: NURS 5302, 5429

Electives/Independent Study

Elective courses may be taken in Nursing or other departments of the University. Electives can also be transferred from other universities with the approval of the Graduate Advisor. Independent study offers the student the opportunity to explore topics of special interest.

Post-Masters Nursing Certificates

The nurse practitioner certificate enables graduates to be recognized by the Board of Nurse Examiners as an Advanced Practice Nurse and to take a national certification exam in their area of specialization. Certificate students must complete the required courses for the nursing specialty area and functional role.

Acute Care Nurse Practitioner
Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Adult Nurse Practitioner
Emergency Nurse Practitioner
Family Nurse Practitioner
Gerontological Nurse Practitioner
Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (Adult or Family)

Masters Nursing Certificates

Three certificates in Nursing Education are available through the School of Nursing.

MSN Cooperative Programs

Cooperative Agreement between The University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing (TTUHSCSON). Students may transfer a maximum of 21 hours of designated courses from TTUHSCSON to fulfill part of the requirements for an MSN in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing at UTA. Students must complete 27 designated course hours at UTA. See Graduate Advisor for details of Cooperative Agreement.

Cooperative Agreement between The University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing and The University of Texas Southwestern Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner Program. Students who had a BSN and then completed the Women's Health Nurse Practitioner Program may receive 8 hours of credit toward an MSN at UTA. The remainder of the nurse practitioner course requirements must be completed at UTA. See Graduate Advisor for details of Cooperative Agreement.

Cooperative Agreement between The University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing and The University of Texas at Tyler (UTT). Students may transfer a maximum of 18 hours of designated courses from UTT to fulfill part of the requirements for an MSN at UTA. Students must complete 31-34 designated nurse practitioner course hours at UTA. See Graduate Advisor for details of Cooperative Agreement.

Veteran's Administration Medical Centers (VA). The School of Nursing has developed a Cooperative Agreement with eight VA Medical Centers across North Texas to deliver the Nursing Administration MSN through VTEL distanced education (DE) format. See Graduate Advisor for details of Cooperative Agreement.

Texas Health Resources (THR). A Cooperative Agreement exists between THR and the School of Nursing to offer the Nursing Administration MSN by VTEL to Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas and Harris Hospital in Fort Worth. See Graduate Advisor for details of Cooperative Agreement.

Dual or Joint Degree Programs

Dual Degree Programs

Master of Science in Nursing Administration/Master of Business Administration (MSN/MBA) [60 credit hours]

Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Science in Health Care Administration (MSN/HCAD) [56 credit hours]

Joint Degree (MSN from UTA and MPH from U.T. Health Science Center at Houston)

Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Public Health (MSN/MPH) [62-64 credit hours]

Ph.D. Objective:

Doctoral nursing education builds on a foundation of masters nursing education and prepares the student for original research and theory development. The Ph.D. in Nursing Program is designed to prepare nurse scientists to meet the health needs of a rapidly changing and culturally diverse society. The central focus of the Ph.D. in Nursing Program is to prepare researchers and teachers who understand how communities evolve, interact, change and how they prescribe, understand and sanction health, illness and health seeking behaviors.

Ph.D. Admission Requirements

The applicant for the doctor of philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.) degree must meet the general requirements of the Graduate School and have a Master of Science in Nursing degree from a program accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) or proof of equivalent education at a foreign institution.

Foreign students whose native language is not English must take, in addition to the Test of English as a Foreign Language (minimum score of 550), the Test of Spoken English (minimum score of 40). The foreign student must also possess a current Texas RN license for admission.

Ph.D. Admission Status Options

The School of Nursing admission criteria are detailed in the Ph.D. Program Requirements table.

Unconditional Admission

Applicants must meet all criteria for unconditional admission

Probationary Admission

Criteria for probationary admission status are designated in the following Ph.D. Program Requirements table. [5]

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements.

Deferred Status

Deferred decision is granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.

Denial of Admission

An applicant will be denied admission if he/she has less than satisfactory performance on a majority of admission criteria listed in the table below. The Ph.D. Admissions Committee will make a recommendation for denial.

The Ph.D. Program in Nursing Admission Requirements

Admission Criteria Unconditional Probationary
Master' s Degree in Nursing from a National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) or American Association of Colleges of Nursing' s Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) accredited School of Nursing or equivalent. Evaluated by Associate Dean for Doctoral Studies
GPA on master' s coursework. 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale
GRE GRE with a total minimum score of ≥ 500 on verbal; ≥ 500 on quantitative; ≥ 500/≥ 4 on analytical/analytical writing score GPA of 3.3 if GRE is 900-990 [5]
For international students, TOEFL score or TSE-A. TOEFL minimum score of 550 on written portion, 213 on computer based test, OR a score of at least 40 on the TSE-A.
Graduate level statistics course with a minimum grade of B. Implement as stated
Interview 7 or higher on rating scale of 1-10 6 or less on rating scale of 1-10 Evaluated by Admissions Committee
Written statement of goals 7 or higher on rating scale of 1-10 6 or less on rating scale of 1-10 Evaluated by Admissions Committee
Professional liability insurance. Evaluated by Associate Dean for Doctoral Studies.
Current unencumbered license as a RN; license in the state where student is participating in clinical activities. Evaluated by Associate Dean for Doctoral Studies.
Immunizations required by the School of Nursing. Evaluated by Associate Dean for Doctoral Studies.
Criminal background check, which satisfies the Dallas/Fort Worth Hospital council and the Texas Board of Nurse Examiners. Evaluated by Associate Dean for Doctoral Studies.
Drug screen prior to clinical and research activities in health care agencies, which satisfies the Dallas/Fort Worth Hospital council and the Texas Board of Nurse Examiners. Evaluated by Associate Dean for Doctoral Studies.
Demonstrate proficiency in use of computer for word processing, spreadsheet development, and data and text file creation and manipulation. Evaluated by Associate Dean for Doctoral Studies.

 

[5] Students not meeting GPA/GRE ratio will be reviewed by the Admission Committee which is chaired by the Associate Dean for Ph.D. The committee will review the following: GPA, GRE scores, TOEFL (if applicable), Goal Statement, and Interview scores. An applicant who performs successfully on a majority of these criteria will be admitted on probation. The committee will make a final admission decision and document that decision for the student record. When on probation, students can make no grade lower than a 3.0 in their first 12 semester hours of graduate coursework.

Ph.D. Fellowship Criteria

Fellowship selection will be based on the following criteria:

  1. Highest GPA but no lower than 3.0 on BSN and MSN.
  2. New students admitted to UT Arlington in the Fall semester.
  3. Minimum 3.0 GPA in graduate credit hours while receiving fellowship.
  4. Enrolled in a minimum of 6 semester hours in the long semesters.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Students are required to have each semester's planned program approved by the Graduate Advisor prior to registration.A minimum of 58 semester hours is required for the degree: 36 hours of core courses, 12 hours in the portfolio area of choice, 1 hour of dissertation seminar and 9 hours of dissertation.

Ph.D. Required Courses (Core)

NURS 6301 Theoretical Evolution in Science
NURS 6302 Issues in Studying Health of Culturally Diverse and Vulnerable Populations
NURS 6303 Culture of Science
NURS 6304 Measurement in Culturally Diverse and Vulnerable Populations
NURS 6305 Qualitative Methodologies
NURS 6306 Designing and Testing Interventions
NURS 6308 Research Seminar
NURS 6309 Scientific Products: Preparation & Dissemination
NURS 6310 Proposal Development Seminar
6 hours Advanced Statistics approved by Graduate Advisor
3 hours Epidemiology approved by Graduate Advisor

Courses Required for Portfolio Areas (Each student must complete the required courses in one of the two portfolio areas)

Academic Role Development
NURS 6311 The Academic Role in Higher Education
NURS 6313 Preparing Nurse Educators to Assist Students for Care of Diverse and Vulnerable Populations
NURS 6315 Faculty Internship in Nursing Education
3 hours Psychometric Theory Course approved by Graduate Advisor
Clinical Research
NURS 6314 Clinical Research: A Nursing Perspective
NURS 6316 Clinical Research Residency
NURS 6317 Conduct of Research in Clinical Environment
ECON 5333 Microeconomic Theory
6 hours Electives approved by Graduate Advisor
Dissertation
NURS 6101 Dissertation Seminar
NURS 6399 Dissertation
NURS 6699 Dissertation
NURS 6999 Dissertation

Language Requirement

Each doctoral student must demonstrate knowledge of a foreign language by ONE of the following ways:
(1, 2, OR 3)

  1. Reading knowledge of one foreign language (Spanish, French, Russian or other as approved by the Graduate Studies Committee).
    1. Examination prepared by appointee of Dean of Graduate Studies for the University; or
    2. Acceptable score on Testing Service Graduate School Foreign Language Test; or
    3. B or higher on 12 credit hours of a foreign language taken within the last 5 years and approved by the Graduate Studies Committee
  2. Oral proficiency in one foreign language (Spanish, French, Russian or other as approved by the Graduate Studies Committee) as determined by an examination prepared by appointee of Dean of Graduate Studies for the University.
  3. Proficiency in a research tool area (statistics or computer language). Students, upon the advice and consent of their Doctoral Advisory Committee, may meet the foreign language requirement by making a B or higher on 12 credit hours in advanced statistics; information systems courses including database development and management; biomedical instrumentation; graphical information systems; or, other set of courses that support the student's research goals.

Diagnostic Evaluation

After 18 core hours to assess progress and potential for completion

Comprehensive Examination

After all coursework and language requirements

Dissertation Defense


The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; completing course requirements in a later semester cannot change it. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of X) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded X. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an X, the student must complete the course requirements. Enrolling again in the course in which an X was earned cannot change a grade of X. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses). The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour thesis courses and nine-hour dissertation courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either "Graded P/F/R" or "Graded R." Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate Graduate Advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled "R" Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Nursing (NURS)

Course fee information is published in the online Student Schedule of Classes. Please refer to www.uta.edu/schedule for a detailed listing of specific course fees.

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