Link to Search the Graduate Catalog 
UTA Logo
The University of Texas at Arlington
Graduate Catalog 2002-2004

College of Business Administration
Department of Information Systems and Operations Management

www2.uta.edu/infosys
Admission: MSIS Program | Degree Requirements | Courses

Areas of Study and Degrees

Business Administration
M.B.A., Ph.D.
(See Program in Business Administration)

Information Systems
M.S.

Mathematical Sciences
Ph.D.
(See Interdepartmental and Intercampus Programs)

Master's Degree Plans

Thesis or Thesis Substitute

Chair

R.C. Baker
535 Business, 817-272-3502

M.B.A. Graduate Advisor

Greg Frazier
107 Business, 817-272-3004

M.S.I.S. Graduate Advisor

Carolyn Davis
508 Business, 817-272-7399

INSY Ph.D. Graduate Advisor

Vikram Sethi
508 Business, 817-272-3556

OPMA/STAT Ph.D. Graduate Advisor

Greg Frazier
530 Business, 817-272-3559

Graduate Faculty

Professors

Baker, Raja, Schkade, Sircar, Teng, Whiteside

Associate Professors

Eakin, Frazier, Sethi, Sikora, Slinkman

Assistant Professors

Duffy, Henderson, Mahapatra, Nerur, Prater, Song

Objective: M.B.A. Program

Information Systems emphasizes the preparation required for developing and managing computer-based information systems. The comprehensive curriculum includes the study of applicable computer hardware, software, and database technology; the design of information systems; and management and control of information technologies and applications.

Operations Management (OPMA) focuses on the activities involved in the transformation of inputs into outputs for both manufacturing and service organizations. The OPMA courses contain a variety of topics such as scheduling, inventory management, operations strategy, quality, logistics, project management and supply chain management.

Objective: Master of Science in Information Systems

The objective of the Master of Science degree in Information Systems is to provide qualified students with both a general knowledge of business and a specialized knowledge of information systems. Students are exposed to the theory, research, and practical applications of numerous information systems areas including management information systems, database management systems, systems analysis and design, and data communications; and may take electives in distributed systems, information resource management, general systems concepts, electronic commerce, ERP, decision support systems, problem formulation, computer science, management sciences, research, and other related fields. The program is designed to prepare students for information systems careers in government and nonprofit organizations as well as in business and industry.

Objective: Ph.D. in Business Administration Program

The objective of the Ph.D. degree in Business Administration is primarily to develop scholars with an ability to teach and conduct independent research. The program is designed to provide the student with fundamental knowledge in these areas. Doctoral students in information systems can work in many areas of current expertise of the faculty, such as: data base management, systems development, object technology, distributed systems, electronic commerce, information resource management, enterprise resource planning, decision support systems, knowledge management, and human aspects of information systems. Within operations management/statistics, students can concentrate in either operations management or business statistics.

Accreditation

The Master of Science degree in Information Systems is accredited by AACSB.

Admission: M.S.I.S. Program

Admission to the M.S. in Information Systems (MSIS) program is based upon the completion of the general admission requirements of the Graduate School. For MSIS program admission an acceptable score on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and a satisfactory record of undergraduate academic performance are required. If Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are available, they will be accepted in lieu of the GMAT. Applicants are encouraged to submit with their application a resume that highlights professional and personal accomplishments, linguistic abilities, computer expertise and leadership experience. Applicants with two to five years of experience are preferred. A single standardized test score (GMAT/GRE) will not be used as the sole criterion for denying an applicant's admission to the MSIS program. Similarly, scores in English and quantitative skills that fall below acceptable levels on a single standardized test will be viewed in conjunction with other demonstrated skills in these areas.

Students for whom English is not their native language must achieve a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 570 (paper-based) or 230 (computer-based). International applicants that score below minimum acceptable levels on the verbal portion of entrance examinations may be admitted on probation with acceptable demonstration of English proficiency.

Multiple criteria (both quantitative and qualitative) are used to make admission decisions. Quantitative measures include an applicant's GMAT/GRE score, GMAT/GRE Verbal percentile, GMAT/GRE Quantitative percentile, and grade point average as calculated by the Graduate School. For the GMAT, these measures are integrated into a formula, or index, that multiplies the grade point average by 200 and adds the total GMAT score. Index factors are weighed equally at the outset of applicant evaluation. For the GRE, percentiles and GPA are reviewed. When applicable, a graduate grade point average is considered when it is based on at least 24 semester hours of graduate work.

Along with the grade point average and GMAT/GRE total score, admission criteria include the following:

  1. GMAT/GRE sub-scores (verbal and quantitative)
  2. GMAT writing sample
  3. Grades in specified undergraduate business and business-related courses (math, accounting, economics, statistics, for example)
  4. Graduate academic performance, if applicable
  5. Educational objectives and quality of written expression of the application essay
  6. Letters of recommendation from three persons familiar with the applicant's academic background and/or work experience
  7. Undergraduate major and relevance to graduate study in IS
  8. General and specific program Accreditation status of degree granting institution
  9. Professional work experience
  10. Professional certification or licensure

Unconditional Admission

For unconditional admission, the applicant's composite total from the index must be 1120 or higher when GMAT scores are submitted, and items 1 through 6 above should strongly indicate potential for successful academic performance as a graduate information systems student. If an applicant falls below the GMAT Verbal percentile of 30 and/or the GMAT Quantitative percentile of 30, corroborating evidence of proficiency in that skill will be reviewed. When GRE scores are submitted a Verbal percentile of 46 and a GRE Quantitative percentile of 44 are required for unconditional admission. Otherwise, corroborating evidence of proficiency in that skill will be required.

Students who are unconditionally admitted must have a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 as calculated by the Graduate School (or 3.00 at the graduate level), and enroll for a minimum of six semester credit hours to be eligible for available fellowship and/or scholarship support. A standardized test score (GMAT/GRE) will not be used as the sole criterion for determining fellowship and/or scholarship eligibility.

Probationary Admission

For an applicant with an index score below 1120 when GMAT scores are submitted, probationary admission may be available when at least three items of 1 through 6 above strongly indicate potential for successful academic performance as a graduate information systems student. Items 7 through 10 will also be used to identify positive indicators for admission. When verbal or quantitative percentiles are below the 30th percentile (GMAT) or 46th percentile verbal (GRE) and 44th percentile quantitative (GRE), probationary admission may be available. Students admitted on probationary status for low verbal or quantitative percentiles, must satisfactorily complete one or more English and/or math courses in the first two semesters as specified by the Graduate Advisor. Students who are admitted on probation must meet the conditions specified, such as no grade less than 'B' for the first 12 hours of graduate study and any required undergraduate course.

Provisional, Deferred and Denied Admission

A provisional decision to admit may be granted when the applicant meets criteria for unconditional or probationary status but one or more applicant credentials are incomplete. A deferred decision may be made when an applicant's file is not sufficiently complete to make an admit or deny decision.

For an applicant who does not meet minimum acceptable scores on the GMAT or GRE examinations, and other evidence indicates lack of potential for academic success as a graduate information systems student, admission will be denied. However, all applicant data will be carefully reviewed before an admission denial is made.

Degree Requirements

For students who have earned a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree (or equivalent), the program consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours, including six hours of thesis work. Nine semester hours of advanced electives approved by the Graduate Advisor can be substituted for the thesis, in which case the advanced program will be 33 semester hours. Students who do not have a BBA may have to take additional coursework (up to 27 semester hours) to acquire sufficient general business knowledge for effective performance as an information systems professional. Foundation courses which are listed in Section 1 below, may be waived if equivalent coursework has been completed.

The minimum advanced program of 30 semester hours contains six hours of required work in research and statistical methods; 12 hours of required work in management information systems (MIS), database management systems, systems analysis and design, and distributed information systems and data communications; six hours of electives (to be selected from an approved list of elective courses, or to be approved upon selection by the Graduate Advisor); and six hours of thesis demonstrating acceptable performance on a major systems project or an approved nine-semester-hour thesis substitute.

The required curriculum is as follows:

  1. Foundation Courses (27 semester hours)
    ACCT 5301 Accounting Analysis I
    ACCT 5302 Accounting Analysis II
    ECON 5311 Economics Analysis I
    BUSA 5303 Quantitative Analysis for Business Administration
    INSY 5310 Information and Decision Systems Concepts
    MARK 5311 Marketing
    FINA 5311 Finance
    MANA 5312 Management

    OPMA 5361 Operations Management
  2. Advanced Courses (Thesis Substitute Option - 33 hours; Thesis Option - 30 hours)

    (a) Required Research courses (6 semester hours)
    BUS6 5325 Advanced Statistical Methods in Business
    Approved Research Elective

    (b) Required Information Systems courses
    Thesis Substitute Option (15 semester hours)*
    INSY 5330 Information and Decision Systems Concepts
    INSY 5335 Applied Database Management
    INSY 5341 Systems Analysis and Design
    INSY 5343 Computer Networks and Distributed Systems
    INSY 5375 Management of Information Systems
    Thesis Option (12 semester hours)*
    INSY 5330 Information and Decision Systems Concepts
    INSY 5335 Applied Database Management
    INSY 5341 Systems Analysis and Design
    INSY 5343 Computer Networks and Distributed Systems

    (c ) Approved Electives
    Thesis Substitute Option (12 semester hours)
    Approved electives (12 semester hours)
    Thesis Option (12 semester hours)
    Thesis (BUSA 5698) (6 semester hours)
    Approved electives (6 semester hours)

To the extent possible, electives should be chosen from one of the four suggested information systems tracks: IT management, systems development, enterprise resource planning, or electronic commerce.**

Upon Graduate Advisor approval, outside elective courses may be selected from areas such as accounting, computer science, finance, industrial engineering, management, management sciences, marketing, mathematical sciences, psychology, and operations management (6 semester hours).

*Courses may be substituted if equivalent courses have been taken.
**An approved 3-credit hour graduate internship (BUSA 5399) may also be taken as an elective.

The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; it cannot be changed by completing course requirements in a later semester. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of X) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded X. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an X, the student must complete the course requirements. A grade of X cannot be changed by enrolling again in the course in which an X was earned. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses). The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour thesis courses and nine-hour dissertation courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either"Graded P/F/R" or "Graded R." Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate Graduate Advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled "R" Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Information Systems (INSY)

Course fee information is published in the online student Schedule of Classes at www.uta.edu/schedule. Please refer to this Web site for a detailed listing of specific course fees.

Important note regarding current course requirements: Current course descriptions and prerequisites can be found at www2.uta.edu/infosys/programs.htm. Because of the dynamic and changing nature of information systems courses, students should check this site or consult an advisor each semester to determine the latest course prerequisites for all information systems courses.

5307. WEB PROGRAMMING (3-0). Introduction to programming, client-side Web applications and design using various web-centric tools such as HTML, Cascading Style Sheets, JavaScript and DHTML. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5308. ADVANCED BUSINESS COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (3-0). Topics include the visual programming environment, event-driven programming, file processing, database processing, error handling, objects and class libraries. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5309. OBJECT-ORIENTED BUSINESS PROGRAMMING (3-0). Topics include fundamental programming structures, objects and classes, inheritance, graphics programming, user interfaces, intranet and Internet applets, data structures and files, and multithreading. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5310. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0). Introduction to the terminology and use of computers in organizations, including hardware and software technology, business data processing, distributed processing and networking, management information systems, database management systems, decision support systems, expert systems, and office information systems. Major software packages for business are presented and selectively utilized. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5315. ADVANCED WEB DEVELOPMENT (3-0). Advanced Web development for server-side Web applications using Active Server Pages (ASP) and other techniques. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5330. INFORMATION AND DECISION SYSTEMS CONCEPTS (3-0). Concepts, frameworks, research, and practice covering the entire spectrum of the field of information systems: structure, development, and implementation of information systems; computer-based applications; management and control of corporate information systems; decision-support systems and expert systems; current trends, including electronic commerce and outsourcing. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5331. TOPICS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0). Conceptual foundations of system modeling and development. Methodologies for analysis and design, optimization, control and decision making. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5335. APPLIED DATABASE MANAGEMENT (3-0). Concepts, tools, and technologies associated with the design, implementation and management of large databases are presented. Topics include data models (with emphasis on E/R model and relational model), database design and implementation, database query language, transaction management, and distributed databases. Recent advances in data management are also discussed. Use of a commercial DBMS is required. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5340. ELECTRONIC COMMERCE (3-0). Topics may include new perspectives on space, time and money in business; business-to-business networking; the effect of e-commerce on logistics and supply chain management; electronic financial markets and digital payments mechanisms; marketing through digital storefronts and virtual corporations, electronic auctions; and their implications for business strategy and other corporate functions. (Note: This is not a Web site design course). Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5341. ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3-0). Analysis and design phase of systems development life cycle. Topics include systems survey, functional specification, interface specification, data design, program design, system testing, and implementation. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5342. INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT (3-0). An integrative course in which students work with an information system project throughout the entire development life cycle. Topics to be addressed include project management, documentation and group dynamics, as well as the integration of analysis, design, programming and other IS skills. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5343. COMPUTER COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING (3-0). Technological and managerial issues related to design, operation and maintenance of computer networks. Topics include communication architectures and protocols, LANs and WANs, ATM and frame relay, cellular and satellite communication, the World Wide Web, the Internet, and electronic commerce. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5350. HEALTH CARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0). Addresses issues in the development, integration, and management of health care information systems. Specifically, topics in financial information systems, patient care systems, and health care delivery applications will be discussed. Both case studies and real life applications will be studied. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5352. TOPICS IN OBJECT TECHNOLOGY (3-0). Coverage of current topics in Object Technology. Includes the study of Object-Oriented Agents, Components, Object Request Brokers, distributed objects and related implementations of object-oriented software. Also includes the study of design patterns in object-oriented software design. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5354. ENTERPRISE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT (3-0). This course will address the architectures, methodologies, tools and techniques used in the development and deployment of enterprise-level information systems applications. The topics covered will include client/server applications, intranet/internet applications, distributed applications, enterprise-level objects and server-side components. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5355. KNOWLEDGE AND DECISION MANAGEMENT (3-0). Conceptual foundations of decision support. Includes individual and group support, and the integration of knowledge systems, executive information, and executive support systems. Analysis and review of current literature. Design and implementation of decision support applications. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5357. ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING (3-0). An introduction to enterprise resource planning (ERP), a business management paradigm that integrates all facets of the business, including planning, manufacturing, sales, finance and marketing. Course will cover both the methodology and practice of ERP using commercial software packages. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5358. HUMAN AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES (3-0). Includes human-computer interaction, task difficulty and performance, decision styles, ergonomics, individual and organizational adoption and diffusion of technologies, and issues surrounding the management of change as affected by information technologies. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5360. ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES (3-0). Covers the technology and techniques of ERP from the information systems perspective. Topics include active dictionary systems, programming languages, application development, and electronic commerce applications. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5365. ELECTRONIC COMMERCE APPLICATION TECHNOLOGIES (3-0). Survey and assessment of tools, technologies and solutions available for e-commerce application design, development and deployment. Topics will include discussion and evaluation of tools and technologies for the development and implementation of site servers, commerce servers, application servers, Web servers, electronic storefronts, catalogs, shopping carts, search engines and other e-commerce enablers. Tools for content development, management and delivery will also be addressed. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5370. ADVANCED ELECTRONIC COMMERCE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT (3-0). Developing and maintaining advanced e-commerce applications. Topics will include the development of client-side scripting, server-side scripting, database connectivity and access, data retrieval and updates, dynamic web content development, cascading styles, server based components, site design, SSL security, certificates, shopping carts and payment processing in e-commerce applications. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5375. MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0). Addresses the management of the information resource from a senior management viewpoint. Covers the use of information technology to achieve competitive advantage, information technology and the organization, managing information assets, managing outsourcing, information technology operations and management processes, and information technology as a business. Should be taken in the student's final semester. Prerequisites: See important note regarding current course requirements.

5182, 5282, 5382. INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS. Extensive analysis of an information systems topic. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: consent of faculty member and department chair.

5192, 5292, 5392. SELECTED TOPICS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS. In-depth study of selected topics in information systems. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and Graduate Advisor.

5398, 5698. THESIS. Prerequisite: permission of Graduate Advisor in Information Systems. 5398 graded R/F; 5698 graded P/F/R.

6182, 6282, 6382. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS. Doctoral level study of information systems topics. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent of the instructor.

6301. SEMINAR IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0). Seminar in current issues and topics in Information Systems. Areas addressed may include primary concepts of Information Systems, theoretical frameworks for systems applied to informations systems development, management and decision making. Prerequisite: INSY 5330 or consent of instructor.

6302. SEMINAR IN OBJECT TECHNOLOGY (3-0). Includes the study of Object-Oriented systems and related object-oriented software. Research topics in Object Technology, Object-Oriented Systems, design patterns and object-oriented software design are addressed. Prerequisite: INSY 5341 and JAVA programming language (INSY 5309 or equivalent).

6305. SEMINAR IN KNOWLEDGE AND DECISION MANAGEMENT (3-0). Examines the conceptual foundations and evolving nature of decision making and support systems, including individual and group support systems, expert systems, knowledge management systems, and executive support systems. Extensive review and analysis of current literature. Publishable quality research paper is required. Prerequisites: INSY 5330, BUS6 5325.

6306. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES (3-0). Research issues and future trends in client/server computing. Emphasis on development and deployment of systems in a client/server environment. Prerequisites: INSY 5341.

6307. INFORMATION RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3-0). Impact of information technology on organizational structure/strategy. MIS resources such as data, personnel, hardware/software. Management issues: computer center operations/administration, project management. Prerequisite: INSY 5345.

6308. SEMINAR IN HUMAN AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES (3-0). Advanced study of human and organizational issues including human-computer interaction, group dynamics, ergonomics, change management, cognitive and risk-taking aspects, technology adoption and diffusion. Prerequisite: INSY 5330.

6311. INFORMATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH SEMINAR (3-0). Integrative analysis of research in information systems, including research philosophies and methodologies, contemporary research
topics, dissertation research and future directions for information systems research. Prerequisite: INSY 6301.

6380. RESEARCH IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0). Independent research under the supervision of a faculty member; may be repeated when topic varies. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

6392. SELECTED TOPICS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0). Advanced doctoral level topics in Information Systems. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent of the instructor.

DISSERTATION See Business Administration entry for students in the Ph.D. Program in Business Administration; see Mathematical Science entry for students in the Ph.D. Program in Mathematical Sciences.

Management Sciences (MASI)

Course fee information is published in the online Student Schedule of Classes at www.uta.edu/schedule. Please refer to this Web site for a detailed listing of specific course fees.

5330. NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS (3-0). A survey of statistical techniques which may be used when the normal assumptions of parametric statistics cannot be made; inclusion of procedures for cross-classified data, methods involving ranks, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov type techniques. Prerequisite: BUSA 5325 or equivalent.

5331. STATISTICAL GRAPHICS AND GRAPHICAL PERCEPTION (3-0). Graphical depiction and analysis of data structure, graphical software, and graphical perception. Statistical topics would include exploratory analysis of univariate and multivariate data using graphical software, e.g., Lowess Smoothing and Sunflower Plots. Graphical perception topics include mental imaging theory, Weber's and Steven's Laws, decision support, and review and critiques of current literature. Prerequisite: BUSA 5325 or equivalent.

5332. ADVANCED DATA COLLECTION (3-0). Surveys, audits, samples and experimental designs contrasted and compared as a basis for statistical inference. Emphasis is on the integration of techniques common to differing areas of business research. Prerequisite: BUSA 5325 or equivalent.

5182, 5282, 5382. INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCES. Extensive analysis of a management sciences topic. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: consent of faculty member and Graduate Advisor.

5392. SELECTED TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCES. In-depth study of selected topics in management sciences. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and Graduate Advisor.

6309. MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL METHODS (3-0). Focuses on methods of analyzing mean and covariance structures. Topics include commonly applied multivariate methods such as multiple analysis of variance, repeated measures, discriminant analysis, profile analysis, canonical correlations, and factor analytic methods. The use of matrix algebra and available computer packages will be stressed. Prerequisite: BUS6 5325.

Operations Management (OPMA)

Course fee information is published in the online Student Schedule of Classes at www.uta.edu/schedule. Please refer to this Web site for a detailed listing of specific course fees.

5321. INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SCIENCES (3-0). Introduction to optimization and quantitative analysis of business problems. Topics include applications of linear and integer programming, network analysis, simulation, game theory, queuing theory, and other operations research tools.

5324. COMPUTER MODELS IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3-0). Course covers applications of common software packages used in operations management. Prerequisite: OPMA 5361.

5361. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3-0). Introduction to concepts and problem-solving techniques important in production management and operations management. Topics include demand forecasting, capacity management, resource allocation, inventory management, supply chain management, quality control, and project management.

5363. OPERATIONS PLANNING AND CONTROL (3-0). Course covers operations planning and control systems in manufacturing and service organizations. Topics include inventory control, material requirements planning, Just-In-Time and lean manufacturing, production scheduling, capacity planning, and operations planning and control software. Prerequisite: OPMA 5361.

5364. PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3-0). Course covers concepts and issues important in effectively managing projects. Topics include project selection, project planning, negotiation, budgeting, scheduling, resource allocation, project control, project auditing, and project termination. Prerequisite: OPMA 5361.

5365. MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT (3-0). Course focuses on current manufacturing technologies and their managerial implications. Also covers strategic issues such as technology justification, adoption, implementation, and integration. Prerequisite: OPMA 5361.

5367. QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3-0). Course focuses on quality of products and services needed by society. Topics include consideration of quality cost and improvements, designing for quality,process controls, inspections, testing, acceptance sampling, management controls, and quality information systems. Prerequisite: BUSA 5301 or equivalent.

5368. GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3-0). Course covers concepts and issues important in managing supply chains. A strategic view is taken of the way companies coordinate their operations with suppliers and customers in a global marketplace. The strategic use of information systems to better manage supply chains is also covered. Prerequisite: OPMA 5361.

5369. LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (3-0). Course covers physical supply, in-plant movement and storage, and physical distribution of materials, which comprise logistics systems in industry. Topics include facility location, transportation, warehousing, inventory control, distribution networks, and logistics information systems. Prerequisite: OPMA 5361.

5392. SELECTED TOPICS IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3-0). In-depth study of selected topics in operations management. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Graduate Advisor.

6370. SEMINAR IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3-0). Doctoral seminar that is a comprehensive and integrative study of operations management that focuses on theoretical frameworks, applications of models, and methods of analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

6371. INTEGRATED OPERATIONS STRATEGY AND RESEARCH (3-0). Linkages between the manufacturing and strategy development functions. Research issues within production/operations management. Current techniques/designs for achieving effective research. Prerequisite: OPMA 5361.

6380. RESEARCH IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3-0). Independent research under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and Graduate Advisor.

DISSERTATION See Mathematical Sciences entry for students in the Ph.D. Program in Mathematical Sciences; see Business Administration entry for students in the Ph.D. Program in Business Administration.

Top^

Expect Great Things!