Link to Search the Graduate Catalog 
UTA Logo
The University of Texas at Arlington
Graduate Catalog 2002-2004


Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

www-ce.uta.edu
Admission | Grade Requirements and Continuation | Degree Requirements | Dual Degree Program | Courses

Area of Study and Degrees

Civil Engineering

M.S., M.Engr., Ph.D.

Master's Degree Plans

Thesis (M.S.) and Non-Thesis (M.Engr.)

Chair

Siamak A. Ardekani

425 Nedderman Hall, 817-272-5055

Graduate Advisor

Ernest C. Crosby

417 Nedderman Hall, 817-272-2201

Graduate Faculty

Professors

Ardekani, Matthys, Parker,

Qasim, Williams, Yuan

Associate Professors

Crosby, Kruzic,

Puppala, Spindler

Assistant Professors

Abolmaali, Hoyos

Senior Lecturer

Govind

Professor and President Emeritus

Nedderman

Professors Emeritus

Everard, Huang

Objective

The objective of the graduate program in civil engineering is to prepare students for continued professional and scholarly development consistent with their technical interests. Students, with the assistance of a faculty advisor in their area of interest, plan their programs of study in one of the technical areas in civil engineering. Typical program and research areas are:

  1. Environmental (water and air quality control, and solid and hazardous materials control);
  2. Geotechnical (soil mechanics and foundations);
  3. Infrastructure Systems;
  4. Structures and Applied Mechanics;
  5. Transportation (traffic planning, highways, airports and transit); and
  6. Water Resources (hydrology and hydraulics).

Research and continuing education opportunities in the environmental and construction areas are offered through two centers within the department. Information relative to the Advanced Transportation Research and Applications Center of Texas, and the Construction Research Center can be found in the front portion of this catalog (see catalog index).

The department provides the student an opportunity to study advanced and special topics that are on the forefront of technology. These courses carry CE 5300 or CE 6300 numbers and are identified on a student's academic record by both number and course title. Examples of topics offered in the typical program areas are:

Environmental - Advanced Dispersion Modeling, Analysis of Pollutant Characteristics, Hazardous Waste Remediation;

Geotechnical - Expansive Clays, Soil Chemical Stabilization, Unsaturated Soils, Design of Earth Structures;

Infrastructure Systems - Civil Engineering systems to transport people, goods, water, waste disposal, energy and information;

Structures and Applied Mechanics - Finite Element Methods, Numerical Methods in Structural Analysis, Structural Dynamics, Composite Structures, Advanced Concrete Design, Hot Rolled/Cold Formed Steel Design;

Transportation - Intelligent Transportation Systems, Network Modeling, Urban Operations Research, Vehicular Energy Consumption and Emissions, Transit and Paratransit, Intermodal Systems;

Water Resources - Groundwater, Kinematic Wave Theory, Urban Hydrology, Contaminant Transport, Stormwater, Detention Design.

Admission

CE Master's Program

Applicant's receiving Unconditional Admission should meet the following guidelines:

  1. A Bachelor's Degree in Engineering (Applicant with a Bachelor's Degree in another discipline is considered, subject to satisfactory completion of deficiency courses for area of interest.)
  2. An overall GPA of 3.0 or better (on a 4.0 scale) in the final 60 hours of undergraduate coursework and an overall GPA of 3.5 in graduate coursework. GPA is calculated by the UTA Graduate School. This meets the UTA Graduate School standard.
  3. A minimum total combined score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), meeting the UTA Graduate School Standard.
  4. 4. For applicants whose native language is not English, a minimum score of 550 on the written TOEFL exam, 220 on the computer TOEFL, 40 on the TSE-A, 50 on the SPEAK, 350 on verbal GRE, 85 on METLAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery), or 7 on the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). (METLAB and IELTS are used only when other tests are not available in the applicant's country.)
  5. Favorable letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant's academic work and potential.
  6. 6. If an applicant has a combined verbal and quantitative GRE score between 950 and 1000, and/or a GPA between 2.6 and 3.0, the applicant is considered for Unconditional Admission when a further, in-depth review of the following information indicates the applicant is qualified to enter the Master's Program:
  7. An applicant may be considered for Probationary Admission, if after additional review, an applicant is considered not qualified for Unconditional Admission. The most common conditions of Probationary Admission require the applicant to:
  8. Applicants with a combined verbal and quantitative GRE score less than 950, and/or an undergraduate GPA below 2.6 in the last 60 hours of their coursework as calculated by the UTA Graduate School, are considered for Probationary Admission when an in-depth review of indicators in item 6 above (each having equal weight) indicates these exams may not reflect the academic potential of the applicant. Decision to grant will be made by a simple majority of indicators. Probationary Admission may be considered when TOEFL scores are below 550 (written) or 220 (computer).
  9. A Provisional Admission may be granted if an applicant is unable to supply all required documentation before the admission deadline, but otherwise appears to meet admission requirements.
  10. A Deferred Decision may be granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.
  11. A Waiver of GRE Admission may be granted to a UTA graduate applicant from a UTA feeder program for a CE degree. Applicant must have a GPA of 3.0 (on a scale of 4.0) in overall, major field, all advanced work, and in the last 60 hours of coursework at UTA. This admission must occur within three years of graduation.
  12. An Advanced Admission of Outstanding Undergraduates may be granted to a UTA graduate within one academic year after graduation. The applicant must have a GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) in overall work, and in all UTA advanced undergraduate work in the normal feeder undergraduate program for a CE degree.
  13. A Denial Decision is made when the overall evaluation of the applicant using a simple majority of indicators listed in item 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 above points out that the academic potential of the applicant is unlikely to allow for the successful completion of an advanced degree. Items 1, 2, 4, 5 and each indicator in item 6 have equal weight in evaluation.

Scholarships and Fellowships

A Fellowship may be granted only to a student having at least a GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 undergraduate credit hours, plus any graduate credit hours with at least a 3.0 GPA. Recipients must maintain at least a 3.0 overall graduate GPA, and must enroll in 6 hours of credit in each of the two long semesters to retain their fellowships.

CE Doctoral Program

Applicant's receiving Unconditional Admission should meet the following guidelines:

  1. A Master's Degree or at least 30 hours of graduate coursework in Engineering. (Applicant with a Master's Degree in another discipline is considered, subject to satisfactory completion of deficiency or leveling courses for area of interest.)
  2. An overall GPA of 3.5 or better (on a 4.0 scale) in graduate course work. This meets the UTA Graduate School standard.
  3. A minimum total combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), meeting the UTA Graduate School standard.
  4. For applicants whose native language is not English, a minimum score of 550 on the written TOEFL exam, 220 on the computer TOEFL, 40 on the TSE-A, 50 on the SPEAK, 350 on verbal GRE, 85 on METLAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery), or 7 on the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). (METLAB and IELTS are used only when other tests are not available in the applicant's country.)
  5. Favorable letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant's academic work and potential.
  6. If an applicant has a combined verbal and quantitative GRE score less than 1200, the applicant may be considered for Unconditional Admission when a further, in-depth review of the following information indicates the applicant is qualified to enter the Doctoral Program:
  7. An applicant may be considered for Probationary Admission, if after additional review, an applicant is considered not qualified for Unconditional Admission. The most common conditions of Probationary Admission require the applicant to:

Scholarships and Fellowships

A Fellowship may be granted only to a student having at least a GPA of 3.0 in their graduate credit hours. Recipients must maintain at least a 3.5 overall graduate GPA, and must enroll in 6 hours of credit in each of the two long semesters to retain their fellowships.

Grade Requirements and Continuation

The Civil Engineering Graduate Program has established rules, regulations, policies, and procedures for continuation in the graduate program and fulfilling graduation requirements. These can be found in the Civil Engineering Graduate Handbook available in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Office. In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School listed elsewhere, to continue in the program each civil engineering graduate student must:

  1. Maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher for the Master's program and 3.5 or higher for the Ph.D. program in all coursework undertaken and all coursework on his/her approved program of study.
  2. Accumulate no more than three deficiency points as defined below.

A student will be declared ineligible for further graduate study in civil engineering and will be dismissed from the civil engineering graduate program if he/she accumulates grade deficiency points greater than three. Any grade of C is one deficiency point, any grade of D is two deficiency points, and any grade of F is three deficiency points. Deficiency points may not be removed from the student's record by repeating a course or by completing additional coursework.

No organized course in which a grade of P is received can be used to satisfy course requirements for a graduate degree in civil engineering.

Degree Requirements

The responsibility rests with each student for knowing the rules, regulations, and filing deadlines of the Graduate School and the Civil Engineering Committee on Graduate Studies (see Civil Engineering Graduate Handbook available in Civil and Environmental Engineering Office). Requirements of the Graduate School and the Civil Engineering Committee on Graduate Studies must be met. The degrees offered and minimum course requirements are identified in the following paragraphs.

The Master of Science degree is a research-oriented program in which completion of a thesis is mandatory. The program consists of a minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework and an acceptable thesis (six credit hours). The Master of Engineering degree is an engineering practice-oriented program requiring a minimum of 36 credit hours. A maximum of six hours may be a special project. A final program examination is required of all master's degree candidates. Thesis degree candidates will be required to present an oral defense of the thesis. Non-thesis degree candidates will fulfill the program examination requirement upon the successful completion of CE 5193, Master's Comprehensive Examination. Candidates must enroll in CE 5193 in the semester they intend to graduate.

The Ph.D. degree is a research degree and, as such, requires the candidate to successfully carry out original, independent research in an area acceptable to the civil engineering faculty. Normally, a minimum of one year of advanced coursework beyond the master's degree is required.

Dual Degree Program

Students in the Civil Engineering program may participate in a dual degree program whereby they can earn a Master's Degree in Civil Engineering and a Master of City and Regional Planning. By participating in a dual degree program, students can apply a number of semester hours jointly to meet the requirements of both degrees, thus reducing the total number of hours required to earn both degrees separately. The number of hours that may be jointly applied ranges from six to 18 hours, subject to the approval of each program's Committee on Graduate Studies and Graduate Advisor. Those interested in the dual degree program should consult the appropriate graduate programs for further information on course requirements, including information regarding which courses are suitable for joint application of credit hours.

To participate in the dual degree program, students must make a separate application to each program, be accepted by each program, and must submit separate Programs of Work for each degree showing only courses that meet requirements for the specified degree, including those joint courses that meet requirements for both degrees. A student must be admitted to the second program before completing more than 15 semester hours in the first, exclusive of leveling, deficiency, or foundation courses, and must complete the second degree within one academic year following completion of the first. See also the statement on "Dual Degree Programs" in the general admission section of this catalog.

The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; it cannot be changed by completing course requirements in a later semester. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of X) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded X. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an X, the student must complete the course requirements. A grade of X cannot be changed by enrolling again in the course in which an X was earned. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses). The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour thesis courses and nine-hour dissertation courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either "Graded P/F/R" or "Graded R." Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate Graduate Advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled "R" Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Civil Engineering Courses by Area of Study

Structures and Applied Mechanics: 5301, 5303, 5304, 5305, 5306, 5307, 5308, 5309, 5311, 5312, 5314, 5315, 6351, 6352, 6353.

Transportation: 5330, 5331, 5332, 5333, 5335, 5336, 5337, 6306, 6308, 6309.

Environmental: 5316, 5317, 5318, 5319, 5320, 5321, 5325, 5328, 5329, 6323, 6324, 6326, 6328, 6329.

Geotechnical: 5363, 5364, 5365, 5366, 5367, 5368, 5370, 5371, 5372, 5373, 5374, 6311, 6312.

Water Resources: 5346, 5347, 5348, 5352, 6314.

Infrastructure: 5344, 5345.

Civil Engineering (CE)

Course fee information is published in the online Student Schedule of Classes at www.uta.edu/schedule. Please refer to this Web site for a detailed listing of specific course fees.

5191, 5391. ADVANCED STUDIES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. Individual studies of advanced topics under the supervision of a professor or professors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Graded P/F/R.

5193. MASTER'S COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION (1-0). Directed study, consultation, and comprehensive examination over coursework leading to the Master of Engineering degree in civil engineering. Required of all Master of Engineering students in the semester they plan to graduate. Graded P/F/R.

5300. TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (3-0). Topics of current interest in the field of civil engineering. The subject title is listed in the class schedule and in the student's record. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5301. ENERGY METHODS IN APPLIED MECHANICS (3-0). Minimum potential energy, principle of complementary energy. Castigliano's Theorem, and variational principles. Also Hamilton's principles and Lagrange's equations. Credit not granted for both CE 5301 and EM 5324. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5303. MATRIX METHODS FOR STRUCTURES (3-0). Stiffness and flexibility methods of structural analysis by using matrix algebra. Credit not granted for both CE 4308 and CE 5303. Prerequisite: CE 3341.

5304. STRUCTURAL DESIGN IN LIGHT GAGE STEEL (3-0). Design course for cold formed steel structures. Includes post buckling, plate behavior of stiffened and unstiffened elements, columns, braced and unbraced beams, connectors, and shear diaphragms. Building Codes and related recommended practice documents. Prerequisite: CE 4348.

5305. COMPOSITE STRUCTURES IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (3-0). A design synthesis course for fiber reinforced plastics in civil engineering structures. Topics include types of plastics and composites, structural behavior, analysis and design of flat sandwich structures, axially loaded members, beam-columns, and building connections. Building codes and related recommended practice documents. Prerequisite: CE 3341.

5306. STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN (3-0). The basic design course for steel structures emphasizing Load Resistant Factor Design Method. Topics include tension members, compression members, flexural members, and simple connections. Building Codes and related documents. Credit not granted for both CE 5306 and CE 4348. Prerequisite: CE 3341.

5307. STRUCTURAL TIMBER DESIGN (3-0). Covers grade and design properties of structural lumber; design criteria using timber; design of bending and compression members; connectors design; design of glued laminated timber, box beams, stressed-skin panels, shear walls, and trusses. Prerequisite: CE 3341.

5308. MASONRY STRUCTURES (3-0). Includes masonry unit types and grades, mortar types, reinforcing and connectors, and beam, column, arch, bearing wall design. Structural behavior and standard construction practices. Plain and reinforced masonry, building codes and recommended practice documents. Prerequisite: CE 3341.

5309. PRESTRESSED CONCRETE (3-0). Discussions concerning materials and methods used in prestressing; design of sections for flexure, shear, anchorage, and torsion; camber, deflections and cable layouts, simple spans, continuous beams, and prestressed tanks. Prerequisite: CE 4347.

5311. ADVANCED STEEL DESIGN (3-0). A design synthesis course for metal structures. Topics include beam columns, building connections, plastic design, rigid frame, and multistory building design. Building codes and related documents. Prerequisite: CE 4348.

5312. ADVANCED CONCRETE DESIGN (3-0). Includes structural components such as beams, columns, footings and walls using the ultimate strength method; truss model for shear and torsion, development and anchorage; structural systems such as continuous beams, slabs, slender columns, two-way slabs, yield-line theory and shear friction. Prerequisite: CE 4347.

5314. STEEL DESIGN II (3-0). Covers torsional design of beams, beams with web holes, composite design of beams, lateral-torsional buckling of beams, plate buckling, column design and behavior, frame stability, bracing requirements for compression members. Prerequisite: CE 4348.

5315. ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS (3-0). Analysis of stresses and strains at a point, stress-strain relationships, stresses due to various leading conditions, theories of failure, energy methods, shear center, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, torsion and buckling problems. Credit not granted for both CE 5315 and CE 4324. Prerequisite: CE 3311.

5316. WATER SUPPLY AND TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN (3-0). Theory and design of community water supply systems. Design of treatment facilities, equipment selection and distribution network, and cost estimates. Credit not granted for both CE 4356 and CE 5316. Prerequisites: CE 3131 and 3334.

5317. WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT DESIGN (3-0). Effluent quality standards, and theory and design of wastewater treatment plants. Design and layout of wastewater treatment systems using manufacturers' catalogs, and cost estimates. Credit not granted for both CE 4357 and CE 5317. Prerequisites: CE 3131 and 3334.

5318. PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES I (3-0). Principles of unit process modeling using reactor and kinetic theory, and theory and design of mixing, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, gas transfer, adsorption, ion exchange, and disinfection. Prerequisites: CE 3131 and 3334 or consent of instructor.

5319. PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES II (3-0). Principles of water chemistry applied to the theory and design of unit processes including coagulation, precipitation, corrosion, oxidation-reduction, and membrane processes. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and CE 3334 or consent of instructor.

5320. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT (3-0). Technical aspects of current practices and new developments in the management of solid waste facilities. Theory and design of solid waste collection, transfer, disposal and recovery, and reuse systems. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and CE 3334 or consent of instructor.

5321. ENGINEERING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS (3-0). Fundamental principles of engineering science applicable to the comprehension and design of engineered environmental systems. Includes water and air quality indices; kinetic and reactor theory; mass and energy balances; fluid system theory; and applications of physical, chemical and biological processes in the design of engineered environmental systems. May not be used to satisfy any of the requirements for a graduate degree in Civil Engineering. Prerequisites: PHYS 1442, CHEM 1302, 1284, MATH 2325.

5325. BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES (3-0). Biological processes used in water quality control. Includes principles from microbiology and biochemistry applied to suspended and attached growth systems. Prerequisite: CE 5318.

5328. AIR POLLUTION (3-0). Introduction to the field of air pollution, including air pollution law and types, sources, and effects of air pollutants. The ideal gas law and the atmosphere; properties of atmospheric particulates and gases. Emphasis on design of gaseous and particulate collection systems, including cyclones, electrostatic precipitators, fabric filters, scrubbers, incinerators, adsorption and absorption systems. Introduction to air pollutant dispersion modeling. Credit not granted for both CE 5328 and CE 4350. Prerequisite: CE 3131 and CE 3334 or consent of instructor.

5329. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (3-0). Process for the assessment and response to contamination; integrating risk and exposure practices to ensure protection of human health and environment. Includes characterization, EPA tier approach, general aspects of toxicology, dose exposure, pathways, receptors, migration and risk assessment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

5330. CHARACTERISTICS OF TRAFFIC (3-0). The fundamental elements of trafficthe driver, the vehicle, and the roadwayare considered and then extended into studies of streams of traffic flow. Techniques of conducting traffic engineering studies, including methods of measuring speed, volume, and density, are covered along with methods for the determination of capacity on freeways and rural highways (uninterrupted flow facilities). Parking and accident studies are also included. Prerequisite: CE 3302.

5331. TRAFFIC ENGINEERING OPERATIONS (3-0). Methods of traffic regulation and control optimization. Traffic laws, motorist communication by means of traffic control devices, and the design
and operation of both fixed time and actuated traffic signals at intersections. Analysis and design techniques for intersections using capacity and level of service concepts. Credit will not be granted for both CE 4313 and 5331. Prerequisite: CE 3302.

5332. HIGHWAY DESIGN (3-0). Geometric considerations necessary for the design of city streets, highways, and freeways such as the cross sections, vertical and horizontal alignment, sight distances and stopping distances. Includes the design of maneuver areas, channelization, ramps, intersections, and interchanges. Credit will not be granted for both CE 4312 and 5332. Prerequisite: CE 3302.

5333. TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEMS (3-0). Control algorithms and optimization of splits, offsets, and cycle lengths for arterial progression and traffic signals in networks; computer simulation techniques; problem solving with computer simulation and optimization packages; freeway control using ramp meters and dynamic motorist communications. Prerequisites: CE 5331.

5335. AIRPORT ENGINEERING (3-0). Airport master planning, for forecasting air travel demand, airside capacity, passenger terminal design, air traffic control, land access planning and design, landside operations, air cargo facility design. Prerequisite: CE 3302.

5336. PAVEMENT DESIGN (3-0). Principles and theoretical concepts of rigid and flexible pavements for highways and airfields; effects of traffic loads, natural forces, and material quality; current design practices (including bituminous mixture design and pavement foundation design); and pavement management systems. Prerequisites: CE 3302, 3261, and 3343.

5337. URBAN TRANSPORTATION PLANNING (3-0). Theory and application of a comprehensive urban transportation planning methodology. Basic studies of population dynamics, urban growth, land use, forecasting trip generation and distribution, traffic assignment, mode split, evaluation, simulation models, characteristics of mass transit and other non-auto modes, and system design and evaluation. Credit will not be granted for both CE 4311 and 5337. Prerequisite: CE 3302 or consent of instructor.

5344. CONSTRUCTION METHODS: FIELD OPERATIONS (3-0). Introduction to the methods, equipment, and management techniques used in the construction industry. Topics include equipment operating characteristics, job site safety, and field management. Credit not granted for both CE 5344 and CE 4332. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and IE 3312 or equivalent.

5345. INFRASTRUCTURE EVALUATION, MAINTENANCE AND REHABILITATION (3-0). This course is designed for engineers and managers involved in infrastructure development, sustainability, and replacement. Topics include inspection, evaluation, maintenance and rehabilitation alternatives for water distribution, waste and water collection, surface and sub-surface drainage, pavements, bridges and culverts.

5346. OPEN CHANNEL FLOW (3-0). Open channel hydraulic principles, flow classification, backwater curves, transitions, obstructions, bends, flood flow computations, and urban watershed applications. Credit not granted for both CE 4358 and 5346. Prerequisite: CE 3305 or consent of instructor.

5347. SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY (3-0). Elements of hydrometeorology, infiltration, soil moisture, hydrographs, rainfall runoff relationships, and effects of these factors with regard to water resources, urban watersheds, flood control, and environmental issues. Prerequisite: CE 4331 or consent of instructor.

5348. GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY (3-0). Hydrology and hydrogeology of groundwater to include aquifer and vadose properties and measurements, basic flow systems and solutions, well systems, elementary contaminate transport, water quality, recharge, subsidence, flow system analysis, flow nets, and leaky aquifers. Prerequisite: CE 4331 or consent of instructor.

5352. WATER RESOURCES INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN (3-0). Water supply, distribution and drainage infrastructure design for urban, transportation, airport and agricultural uses. Topics include inlet/outlet structures, culverts, retention and detention storage, soil loss, pump stations, etc. Credit not granted for both CE 4359 and CE 5352. Prerequisites: CE 4331 or consent of instructor.

5363. CONSTITUTIVE MODELING OF SOILS (3-0). Fundamental aspects of elasto-plastic behavior of soils along axisymmetric stress paths, shear strength of soils in light of critical state soil mechanics, and constitutive models to predict soil response under saturated and partially saturated conditions, including Cam Clay and modified Cam Clay models. Prerequisites: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

5364. FOUNDATION ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3-0). The design, construction, and performance of footings, rafts, and piles founded on or in sands, clays, silts, stratified soils, and weak rock. Includes the influence of various geologic terrain on selecting foundation type and constructability, in-situ investigations to determine material design parameters, bearing capacity, and settlement of foundations. Credit not granted for both CE 5364 and CE 4321. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

5365. THEORETICAL SOIL MECHANICS (3-0). Theory of consolidation, magnitude, time rate, pore pressure dissipation with variable construction rate and layered soils. Secondary compression, preconsolidation, and preloading. Shear strength of soil. Critical state soil mechanics, dilation and strain-softening in drained shear, pore pressure response in undrained shear, including static liquefaction. Prerequisite: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

5366. SOIL DYNAMICS (3-0). Fundamental aspects of mechanical behavior and characterization of soils and earth structures subjected to dynamic loads, including wave propagation in soils, dynamic soil properties, liquefaction of soils, dynamic bearing capacity of shallow foundations, seismic design of retaining walls, and seismic slope stability. Prerequisites: CE 2312 and CE 3343, or consent of instructor.

5367. DESIGN OF EARTH STRUCTURES (3-0). Study of the states of stress and analysis techniques associated with cuts, fills, and retaining structures. Includes slope stability, embankment reinforcement, conventional and reinforced earth retaining walls, excavation bracing, and sheetpile wharf structures. Prerequisite: CE 5365 or consent of instructor.

5368. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS (3-0). Fundamental aspects of the mechanical behavior of unsaturated soils, including stress and volumetric state variables, matrix suction measurements and soil-water characteristic curves, shear-strain-strength and volume change responses, and suction-controlled laboratory testing techniques. Prerequisites: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

5370. EXPERIMENTAL SOIL MECHANICS (2-3). Experimental studies of soil behavior, soil properties and their test methods which include consolidation, direct shear, static triaxial, and other advanced geotechnical laboratory tests, instrumentation and measurement techniques, design of laboratory experiments and introduction to in situ test methods. Prerequisites: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

5371. SOIL BEHAVIOR (3-0). Fundamental aspects of soil behavior, bonding, crystal structure, surface characteristics, clay mineralogy, soil-water movement, fabric, effective stress concepts,
conduction phenomena, consolidation, and shear strength. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5372. GEOSYNTHETICS (3-0). Geosynthetics properties and testing, design of geotextiles, geogrids, geonets, and geomembranes for applications in separation, pavement, embankment and retaining wall reinforcement, soil stabilization, filtration, drainage and liquid barrier, construction guidelines and case histories. Prerequisites: CE 3343 or consent of instructor.

5373. ENVIRONMENTAL GEOTECHNOLOGY (3-0). Physical and chemical principles of clays, clay mineralogy, coupled flow, hydraulic conductivity, in situ and laboratory tests, chemical transport, adsorption of chemicals, compacted soil liners, geomembrane liners, leachate collection and removal systems, cover systems, other soil remediation methods. Prerequisites: CE 5371 or consent of instructor.

5374. EXPANSIVE SOILS (3-0). Study of expansive soils, classification, site characterization, identification tests, soil classification methods, heave prediction, shallow and deep foundations design on expansive soils, treatment methods, remedial measures. Prerequisites: CE 5365 or consent of instructor.

5395, 5695. MASTER'S PROJECT. Non-thesis master's degree candidates with approval to include a project in their program. Graded P/F/R. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Civil Engineering Graduate Advisor.

5398, 5698. THESIS. Research and preparation pertaining to the master's thesis. 5398 graded R/F only; 5698 graded P/F/R.

6197, 6297, 6397, 6697, 6997. RESEARCH IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. Individual supervised research projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and approval of Civil Engineering Graduate Advisor. Graded P/F/R.

6300. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (3-0). Topics of current interest in the field of civil engineering. The subject title is listed in the class schedule and in the student's record. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

6306. PUBLIC TRANSIT PLANNING AND OPERATION (3-0). Theory and application of technologies used for transit demand analysis, routing, scheduling, evaluation, crew assignment, maintenance strategies, and management. Land-use impact on public transit policy and operation is also introduced. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

6308. ANALYTICAL MODELS IN TRANSPORTATION (3-0). Development and analysis of mathematical models in transportation. Topics include travel demand, trip generation, distribution, mode choice, assignment, plan evaluation, spatial distribution, traffic control and flow models; principles of behavioral, econometric, deterministic, probabilistic, and chaotic simulation models, and their applications. Prerequisite: CE 5337 or consent of instructor.

6309. TRAFFIC FLOW THEORY (3-0). Speed, density relationships of vehicular traffic flow; statistical aspects of traffic events and queuing processes; deterministic models and simulation models of traffic flow behavior; applications of flow theory to traffic problem solutions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

6311. ADVANCED FOUNDATION DESIGN (3-0). Subsurface investigations; advanced design of mat foundations, retaining walls, reinforced retaining walls, anchor tie-backs, driven piles, and piers; destructive and non-destructive tests on deep foundations; group piles, laterally loaded piles, and design of foundations in expansive soils. Prerequisites: CE 4321 or consent of instructor.

6312. IN-SITU TESTING (3-0). Site characterization, in-situ testing procedures and soil property interpretation methods for standard penetration tests, cone penetration tests utilizing friction cone, piezocone, and seismic cone, dilatometer, vane shear, pressure meter, and bore hole shear tests, non-destructive tests for pavement subgrade characterization. Prerequisite: CE 5370 or consent of instructor.

6314. STORMWATER MODELING (3-0). Hydrologic modeling methods and issues, urban watershed modeling, methods of system analysis; analysis of hydrologic components as linear and nonlinear systems, watershed response, kinematic wave; and model parameters optimization. Prerequisites: CE 5346 and 5347.

6323. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT (3-0). Sources, chemistry, monitoring, and classifications of hazardous wastes. Discussion of environmental hazards, legal aspects, transportation, detoxification, storage, and disposal and incineration. Prerequisite: CE 5318 or consent of instructor.

6324. DISPERSION MODELING (3-0). Review of air pollution meteorology; pollutant dispersion calculations; utilizing Gaussian dispersion models; point, line, and area source dispersion calculations; multipoint source dispersion models utilizing computerized models; modeling results application to federal and state regulations. Prerequisite: CE 5328 or consent of instructor.

6326. INDUSTRIAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTE (3-0). Specialized physical, chemical, and biological treatment schemes required to treat specific industrial and hazardous wastes. Pretreatment regulations, individual industries, and combined municipal and industrial waste treatment. Prerequisites: CE 5325 or consent of instructor.

6328. MODELING OF NATURAL WATER SYSTEMS (3-0). Ecological response of lakes, reservoirs, streams, estuaries, and wetlands from point and nonpoint discharges. Mathematical models for water quality prediction and planning examined and developed. Prerequisites: CE 5319 unless waived by instructor, and CE 5325.

6329. ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CONTROL PROCESSES (2-3). Standard laboratory techniques for unit operations and processes in environmental engineering. Advanced environmental engineering theories and practices, research topics, and methods. Prerequisites: CE 5325 or consent of instructor.

6351. ADVANCED THEORY OF STRUCTURES (3-0). Continuation of Theory of Structures I. Study of the theory of arches, rings, tanks, and other circular structures, cable supported systems,
and long span continuous structures, classical methods, and energy methods. Prerequisite: CE 5302 or consent of instructor.

6352. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR STRUCTURES (3-0). Structural stiffness, finite elements of a continuum, plane stress and strain, axi-symmetric stress analysis, element shape functions, and various applications. Prerequisite: CE 5303.

6353. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS (3-0). Equation of motion, free vibration of structural systems, structural response to forcing functions, numerical evaluation of dynamic responses for single and multi degree of freedom systems, dynamic response of linear, nonlinear, and inelastic multi degree of freedom structural systems. Prerequisite: CE 5303 or consent of instructor.

6391. ADVANCED PROJECTS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. Projects using and developing emerging technology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approval of Civil Engineering graduate advisor. Graded P/F/R.

6399,6699,6999. DISSERTATION. Preparation of a doctoral dissertation in civil engineering. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 6399 and 6699 graded R/F only; 6999 graded P/F/R.

A limited number (not to exceed a total of nine semester hours) of the following courses may be applicable toward a graduate degree if approved in advance by the Civil Engineering Graduate Advisor.

4311. URBAN TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING
4312. STREET AND HIGHWAY DESIGN
4313. TRAFFIC ENGINEERING
4321. FOUNDATION ENGINEERING
4324. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS II

4332. CONSTRUCTION METHODS AND MANAGEMENT
4348. STRUCTURAL DESIGN IN METALS

4350. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL
4356. DESIGN OF MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS
4357. DESIGN OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS
4358. OPEN CONDUIT SYSTEMS

4359. WATER RESOURCES DESIGN

Top^

Expect Great Things!