City and Regional Planning

School of Urban and Public Affairs

 

Web www.uta.edu/supa/graduate/cirp.php

Phone 817.272.2338

Fax 817.272.5008

 

551 University Hall

Degrees / Certificates

Master’s Degrees

City & Regional Planning, M.CIRP.

Certificates

Developmental Review Certificate

Geographical Information Systems Certificate

Graduate Faculty

Graduate Advisor

Christa Barreras, Graduate Advisor:

City & Regional Planning, M.CIRP.

Online Public Administration, M.P.A.

Public & Urban Administration, Ph.D.

Public Administration, M.P.A.

Urban Affairs, M.A.

Urban Planning & Public Policy, Ph.D.

Karolyn Field, Graduate Advisor:

City & Regional Planning, M.CIRP.

Online Public Administration, M.P.A.

Public & Urban Administration, Ph.D.

Public Administration, M.P.A.

Urban Affairs, M.A.

Urban Planning & Public Policy, Ph.D.

Program Director

Ivonne Audirac

Professor

Ardeshir Anjomani, Graduate Advisor:

Urban Planning & Public Policy, Ph.D.

Barbara Becker

Jianling Li

Associate Professor

Enid Arvidson

Carl Grodach

Assistant Professor

Karabi Bezboruah

Yekang Ko

Andrew Whittemore

Department Information

Courses

Master’s Degree Program in City and Regional Planning

Factors considered for admission to SUPA Master’s programs

Graduate Certificates

Ph.D. in Urban Planning and Public Policy

Master’s Degree Program in City and Regional Planning

The PAB-accredited Master’s degree program in City and Regional Planning (MCRP) is organized around the theme of Metropolitan Sustainability. Located in the heart of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, the fourth largest metropolitan region in the U.S., the program is situated in an optimal laboratory to study, analyze, and provide planning intervention into contemporary urban problems, such as sprawl, pollution, equity, carbon footprints, economic development, aging infrastructure, and, more generally, creating sustainable regions. The MCRP program prepares students for successful careers as professional planning practitioners and leaders in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. It also seeks to form professionals who are able to contribute to society through basic and applied research in metropolitan planning and sustainability. The application of planning theory, knowledge, techniques, and skills to "real world" planning problems gives students practical experience necessary for guiding the future city, region, and nation. The practical application of theory and research is facilitated by research activities and centers within the School, including the Institute of Urban Studies. The MCRP mission, goals and objectives, and accreditation efforts are shaped in consultation with the twelve-member MCRP Advisory Board composed of alumni and area practitioners.

Factors considered for admission to SUPA Master’s programs

  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score: Writing (Exceptions: Outstanding UT Arlington graduates may qualify for GRE waiver providing they meet certain requirements)
  • Undergraduate Grade Point Average (GPA): The undergraduate GPA based on the last 60 hours of course work as calculated by the Graduate School from the official transcript.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores: Verbal and Quantitative (Exceptions: Outstanding UT Arlington graduates may qualify for GRE waiver providing they meet certain requirements)
  • Letters of Recommendation attesting to the applicant's potential to do Master’s-level work and complete the program. Letters for Master’s programs should be from professors or supervisors at work (download Letter of Recommendation form)
  • Essay by applicant approximately one double-spaced page in length (approximately 250 words). The Essay is considered both for its content and quality of writing. The Essay should address the following questions: 1. Why do you want to earn a Master’s degree in the program for which you are applying? 2. What relevant background and experience do you bring to the program? The essay can also include other concerns you'd like to bring to the attention of the Graduate Advisor or Master’s Admissions Committee.
  • Non-native English speakers only: TOEFL or IELTS scores (Exceptions: An applicant holding either a Bachelor’s or a Master’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university is not required to submit a TOEFL, TOEFL iBT, or IELTS score for admission purposes.)

Types of Admission in Master’s Programs

  1. Unconditional Admission:

    Applicants who meet all the following requirements will be considered for unconditional admission:

    1. Minimum Writing GRE score of 4.0
    2. Minimum Undergraduate GPA of 3.0
    3. Minimum Verbal GRE score of 150 (450 if the test was taken before August 1, 2011), and minimum Quantitative GRE of 141 (450 if the test was taken before August 1, 2011)
    4. Outstanding letters of recommendation
    5. Strong, well-written personal essay
    6. Non-native English speakers only: TOEFL scores of at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 79 (iBT) with sectional scores that meet or exceed 22 Writing, 21 Speaking, 20 Reading, and 16 Listening; or, IELTS score of at least 6.5.
  2. Probationary Admission:

    Applicants who do not meet all requirements for Unconditional admission will be considered for Probationary admission on the basis of the strength of all the listed admission factors. Test scores will not constitute the sole or primary basis for ending consideration of an applicant. Under Probationary admission, special course requirements or other conditions may be imposed by the SUPA Master’s Admissions Committee. Applicants who meet all the standards for Unconditional admission except for deficiency in Writing GRE score will be considered for Probationary Admission conditional on completing an approved Writing course in their first semester.

  3. Other types of admission decisions pertaining to Master’s applicants:

    1. Deferred: Applicants who are unable to supply required application materials, or who must complete additional preparatory work before their admissibility can be determined, may be deferred until records are complete.
    2. Provisional: Applicants who are unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appear to meet admission requirements may be granted Provisional admission pending submission of complete and satisfactory credentials before the end of the semester in which they have registered in a Provisional status.
    3. Denied: Applicants who fail to meet more than one of the admission requirements and for whom the SUPA Master’s Admission Committee finds there is insufficient basis to justify any other kind of admission will be Denied admission. As the admission process is competitive, applicants meeting basic admission requirements who are less well qualified than other applicants may also be denied admission.

Scholarship/Fellowship Criteria

  • Graduate students with a GPA of 3.0 or better who are enrolled in six hours or more are eligible to apply for competitive scholarships and fellowships.
  • Scholarships and fellowships for Master’s and Doctoral students will be competitively awarded based on consideration of the all admission criteria assessed by their admitting programs.

SUPA Inadequate Academic Progress Point System

A student may be subject to dismissal from the program if they accumulate 4 deficiency points during their Master’s degree or their Ph.D. Students who complete a Master’s degree at SUPA will not carry deficiency points into their Ph.D. work. Deficiency points may not be removed from a student’s record by repeating a course or additional coursework.

D = 2 deficiency points

F = 3 deficiency points

I = 1 deficiency point

W = 0.5 deficiency point

Emphasis Areas and Specializations

The MCRP Program offers three emphasis specializations:

  • Urban and Suburban Design and Redevelopment
  • Creative Cities and Economic Development
  • Green Cities and Transportation

Students may also design a hybrid specialization, subject to approval by the program's Graduate Advisor.

A 48 credit hour program consists of:

  1. 24 hours of required core courses
  2. 6 hours of required emphasis area courses
  3. 12-15 hours of electives in emphasis area or related planning field (12 hours for thesis students; 15 hours for thesis-substitute students)
  4. 3-6 hours of thesis or thesis substitute (6 hours for thesis students; 3 hours for thesis-substitute professional report students)

Each student must meet with the program's Graduate Advisor before the end of the first semester to discuss the emphasis area and thesis or thesis-substitute options.

  1. Required Core Courses (24 hours)

    CIRP 5300 Foundations of Urban Theory

    CIRP 5303 Planning History and Theory

    CIRP 5304 Plan Implementation, Zoning, and Regulations

    CIRP 5308 Metropolitan Sustainability and Ethics

    CIRP 5310 Introduction to Urban Structure, Policy and Planning

    CIRP 5316 Land Use Planning and the Law

    CIRP 5318 Techniques of Planning and Administrative Analysis

    CIRP 5380 Research Questions in Planning (taken in penultimate semester)

  2. Required Emphasis Area Courses (6 hours)

    Urban and Suburban Design and Redevelopment

    • CIRP 5332 Project Studio
    • CIRP 5325 Physical Planning and Urban Design

    Creative Cities and Economic Development

    • CIRP 5332 Project Studio
    • CIRP 5326 Cultural Planning and Urban Development

    Green Cities and Transportation

    • CIRP 5332 Project Studio
    • CIRP 5327 Introduction to Green Cities and Transportation
  3. Electives in Emphasis Area or related planning field (12 hours thesis students; 15 hours thesis-substitute students)

    See the program's Graduate Advisor for list of approved electives in each emphasis area, or download a copy from the MCRP webpage. Other courses may be substituted upon approval of the program's Graduate Advisor and/or the relevant faculty mentors.

  4. Thesis or Thesis Substitute (6 hours thesis students; 3 hours thesis-substitute students)

    All M.C.R.P. students must enroll in CIRP 5380 Research Questions in Planning in their penultimate semester to prepare for the Thesis or Professional Report.

    Thesis (minimum of 6 credit hours): This option is recommended for students who enjoy research and/or are interested in pursuing a career in research or private consulting, or who intend to obtain another advanced degree. Students identify a thesis committee chair no later than their penultimate semester and, in consultation with the chair, form a thesis committee consisting of at least three members of the SUPA Graduate Faculty. In consultation with their thesis committee, thesis students develop a research question related to their emphasis area that can be examined via review of relevant scholarly literature, and supplemented by original empirical research. Thesis students must defend their thesis in a public oral examination conducted by all members of the student's thesis committee but which is also open to all members of the faculty. The thesis committee must have copies of the thesis at least two weeks prior to the thesis defense. All members of the student's committee must be present at the defense. Thesis students must be enrolled in the appropriate section (under their committee chair) of CIRP 5698 Planning Thesis the semester in which the thesis is defended. Students receiving advice and assistance from their chair in preparation of the thesis must register in the appropriate section (under their committee chair) of CIRP 5398 Planning Thesis. Once the student is enrolled in the thesis course, continuous enrollment is required.

    Thesis-substitute Professional Report (3 credit hours): This option is recommended for students who are going into professional practice and/or who otherwise desire experience beyond the Project Studio course working on a professional project. Students identify a professional report committee chair no later than their penultimate semester and, in consultation with the chair, form a professional report committee consisting of at least three members of the SUPA Graduate Faculty. In consultation with their professional report committee, students develop a project related to their emphasis area that can be examined via review of relevant benchmark/baseline studies, and supplemented by original empirical research. Professional report students must defend their report in a public oral examination conducted by all members of the student's professional report committee but which is also open to all SUPA graduate faculty and students. Professional Report students must be enrolled in the appropriate section (under their committee chair) of CIRP 5397 Professional Report the semester in which the professional report is defended.

Dual Degrees

To participate in the dual degree program, students must make separate application to each program and must meet the admission requirements of each program. Students must be admitted to the second program before completing more than 24 credit hours in the first program and must complete the second degree within three academic years following completion of the first. By participating in a dual degree program, students may apply 6-18 total credit hours jointly to meet the requirements of both degrees, thus reducing the total number of hours required to earn each degree separately (shared courses are subject to approval by Program Advisors of each program). Degree plans, thesis or professional report proposals, and the final thesis or report must be submitted separately for each degree and approved by Program Advisors and relevant committees of each program. The successful candidate is awarded two degrees (not one joint degree).

Those interested in the dual degree program should consult the appropriate Program Advisors for further information and review the statement on Dual Degree Programs in the general information section of the catalog.

Dual degrees can be arranged with any suitable program. Arrangements for the following dual degrees have already been made between M.C.R.P. and the relevant Program Advisors.

M.C.R.P. and M.P.A. (Master of Public Administration)

M.C.R.P. an d M.A. (Master of Arts in Urban Affairs)

M.C.R.P. and M.S.W. (Master of Social Work)

[1] M.C.R.P. and M.Arch. (Master of Architecture)

M.C.R.P. and M.S.L.A. (Master of Science in Landscape Architecture)

M.C.R.P. and M.S.C.E. (Master of Science in Civil Engineering)/M.Engr. (Master of Engineering)

M.C.R.P. and M.S.Ev.S.E. (Master of Science in Environmental Science and Engineering)

[1] MCRP students without a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture take Path A in the architecture program; those with an undergraduate degree take Path B. All 15 credit hours of electives in the M.Arch. program be taken in the MCRP program. Only in special instances may students select the thesis substitute plan of the MCRP program.

Graduate Certificates

Certificate in Development Review

Certificate Director: Enid Arvidson; enid@uta.edu

The Certificate in Development Review provides training in zoning, subdivision plat review, site design, communication skills, and urban development, while keeping in mind the interests of citizens and the spirit of places. These skills are essential for planners who want to understand proposed development activity, ensure that proposed development is consistent with a city's vision, and facilitate review of development proposals. The program is geared for both entry-level planners/planning technicians, and for professionals in allied fields such as architecture, landscape architecture, law, engineering, and real estate.

The certificate requires completion of 15 hours of graduate-level coursework. All students must take CIRP 5304 Plan and Policy Implementation. Two courses in land use and development are selected from: CIRP 5305 Land Use Planning, Management and Development; CIRP 5306 Urban Revitalization; CIRP 5311 Urban Design; CIRP 5316 Land Use Law; CIRP 5322 Economic Development; or CIRP 5345 Planning and Real Estate Development. One course in communication is selected from: CIRP 5308 Metropolitan Sustainability and Ethics; CIRP 5363 Communication Skills in Planning and Management; or URPA 5341 Professional Report Writing. Lastly, one course in agencies and policies is selected from: CIRP 5313 Urban Growth Policies; CIRP 5315 Transportation Policies; CIRP 5319 Agencies of Planning and Administration; or CIRP 5328/URPA 5326 Public Budgeting.

Certificate in Geographic Information Systems

Certificate Coordinator: Jianling Li; jili@uta.edu

The Geographic Information Systems (GIS) certificate program provides education, skills, applications, and training for graphic displays of neighborhood, city, regional, and small-scale areas. GIS is a powerful computer-based software tool having capabilities to store, manipulate, analyze, and display spatially referenced information. GIS is used at all levels of government at increasing rates and is an effective tool for business, industry, and institutions.

Upon completion, students will be proficient in selecting, using, and applying appropriate computer hardware and software to display graphic information about their subjects of studywhether their field is business, earth & environmental sciences, biology, social work, architecture, landscape architecture, or any other discipline.

The certificate requires completion of CIRP 5356 (Introduction to GIS), CIRP 5357 (Intermediate GIS), and CIRP 5331 (GIS Workshop) as well as two electives to be selected by the student with approval of the GIS Certificate Program advisor. Examples of electives that would be approved include ARCH 5329, CIRP 5320 and 5340, CSE 5330 and 5356, GEOL 5303, and INSY 5310 and 5335.

Ph.D. Program

Application Requirements and Deadlines

Along with the Graduate School application requirements, a complete application includes:

  1. Official transcripts from colleges and universities attended. Information about submitting transcripts is available in the Graduate Catalog; and
  2. Official test score reports for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and, for international applicants, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Information about submitting official test scores is available from the Graduate Catalog. The ETS code for UTA is 6013; and
  3. Three Letters of Recommendation. Letters should attest to the applicant's ability to do Doctoral-level work and complete the dissertation. Letters must be from references who hold a Ph.D. degree; and
  4. Essay by applicant approximately one double-spaced page in length (approximately 250 words). The essay is considered both for its content and writing quality. The essay should discuss research agenda, identify the faculty you wish to work with, and state the reasons for wanting to earn the Doctoral degree.

 

Official transcripts and test scores must be sent directly to the Graduate School by the institution and ETS respectively. Letters of recommendation and personal essay should be sent directly to: Academic Programs Secretary, SUPA Box 19588 , Arlington TX 76019 . It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure all application materials are received by February 1. Incomplete applications or applications received after the deadline will be deferred.

SUPA admits doctoral students for fall semester only. There are no spring and summer admissions. The application deadline for the Doctoral programs is Febrary 1.

Admission Criteria

Applicants may be admitted unconditionally with a graduate GPA of 3.6, a Verbal GRE score of at least 153 (500 if test was taken before August 1, 2011) and a Quantitative GRE score of at least 144 (500 if test was taken before August 1, 2011), except for international applicants who will also be required to have a score of 213 or higher on the TOEFL (550 or higher on the written TOEFL; 79 or higher on TOEFL iBT). Strength of letters of recommendation and quality of personal statement and Master’s degree field of study are also considered.

or

Applicants may be unconditionally admitted with a GPA above 3.7 if they score at least 153 (500) on the Verbal and 140 (400) on the Quantitative subtests or if they score at least 144 (500) on the Quantitative and 146 (400) on the the Verbal subtests.

Applicants not admitted unconditionally may be considered for admission on probation based on factors mentioned above as well as multilingual proficiency, first generation graduate student from family and community service experience. The Doctoral admissions committee will set the probationary conditions.

The admissions committee may defer the admission decision when a component of the application is incomplete. It may also admit a student provisionally when an applicant is unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements.

Scholarship/Fellowship Criteria

  1. Graduate students with a GPA of 3.0 or better who are enrolled in six hours or more are eligible to apply for competitive scholarships and fellowships.
  2. Scholarships and fellowships will be awarded based on the criteria unique to each award.

SUPA Inadequate Academic Progress Point System

A student may be subject to dismissal from the program if they accumulate 4 deficiency points during their Master’s degree or their Ph.D. Students who complete a Master’s degree at SUPA will not carry deficiency points into their Ph.D. work. Deficiency points may not be removed from a student’s record by repeating a course or additional coursework.

D = 2 deficiency points

F = 3 deficiency points

I = 1 deficiency point

W = 0.5 deficiency point

If a Ph.D. student does not complete dissertation proposal within 2 years of passing comprehensive exam, they will accrue 2 deficiency points.

If a Ph.D. student does not complete all requirements for the Doctoral degree within five years after the student unconditionally passes the comprehensive examination, they will accrue 1 deficiency point per year beyond the five year mark.

Diagnostic Examination:

The purpose of the Diagnostic Evaluation is for the student to demonstrate potential to successfully complete his or her Ph.D. program. The method of assessing the student's potential is the following:

i. Completion of the first 9 credit hours of respective Ph.D. core courses with a 3.3 GPA or better; and

ii. Towards the beginning of the second semester of the program, an interview with the respective Ph.D. Diagnostic committee composed of three SUPA graduate faculty

Results of the diagnostic evaluation may be: 1) approval to continue in the Doctoral program; 2) approval to continue with specified remedial work; 3) failure, but with permission for assessment through a second diagnostic evaluation after a specified period; or 4) failure and termination in the program.

Upon successful completion of the Diagnostic Evaluation, the student identifies a dissertation chair and, in consultation with this chair, begins to identify remaining dissertation committee members. The dissertation committee must consist of at least three SUPA graduate faculty members, including the chair.

Written Comprehensive Examination:

Students are eligible to take the Comprehensive Examination after completing all core courses of the respective degree. The Comprehensive Exam marks the end of core coursework and the beginning of concentrated coursework on dissertation research and preparation. The student must be enrolled in the Graduate School in the semester in which he/she takes the comprehensive exam.

The Comprehensive exam may result in: 1) unconditional pass and recommendation to proceed to the next phase of the program; 2) approval to remain in the program but a requirement to meet certain specified additional criteria; 3) failure, but with permission to retake the examination after a period specified by the examining committee; or 4) failure with recommendation not to continue in the program.

After the second failure at the Comprehensive exam, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Upon successful completion of the Comprehensive Exam, students complete their remaining coursework in methods and other courses toward the development of their dissertation proposal. Guidelines for the comprehensive exam are available in the Ph.D. Student Handbook.

Dissertation Proposal:

Upon successful completion of the written comprehensive examination, students will work in preparation of their dissertation proposal. This preparation may include independent study or structured courses and is guided by the student's three-member Dissertation Committee. In the semester beginning the dissertation proposal, students are required to take URPA 6301 Theoretical Foundations and Ph.D. Workshop, which provides theoretical background and techniques to prepare the student for completing the dissertation proposal. Students must also work closely with their dissertation supervisor and committee to develop their dissertation proposal. A formal proposal defense must be held, and the proposal must be formally approved, by the dissertation committee before the student may continue to complete the dissertation. Guidelines for the disseratation proposal are available in the Ph.D. Student Handbook.

Dissertation:

Dissertation (minimum 9 hours)

In the semester beginning the dissertation proposal, students are required to take Theoretical Foundations and Ph.D. Workshop (UPRA 6301 for PUAD students and CIRP 6301 for UPPP students) that provides theoretical background and techniques to prepare the student for completing the dissertation proposal. Students must also work closely with their dissertation supervisor and committee to develop their dissertation proposal. The student must present a formal defense of the proposal and the dissertation committee must approve the proposal before the student may continue to complete the dissertation. The dissertation represents the culmination of the student's academic efforts and so is expected to demonstrate original and independent research activity and be a significant contribution to knowledge.

A student receiving advice and assistance from a faculty member in the preparation of a dissertation must register for the appropriate course commensurate with the student's level of effort that is equivalent to an organized course of the same credit value. Once the student is enrolled in the dissertation course, continuous enrollment is required. The student must accumulate a minimum of nine dissertation hours to graduate.

The Graduate School offers Dissertation Seminars each semester and encourages all Dissertation students to attend.

Doctoral students must enroll in a minimum of 3 dissertation hours (7399) in the term designated as their completion term. Students may designate only one term as the completion term. Doctoral students who do not graduate at the end of ther completion term will receive a grade of R, W or F and must enroll in a minimum of 6 hours of dissertation research (6699 or 6999) every term until graduation.

The dissertation defense is a public oral examination open to all members (faculty, students and invited guests) of the University community. Questioning of the candidate will be directed by the student's dissertation supervising committee. All members of the student's committee must be present at the defense. Although the defense is concerned primarily with the dissertation research and its interpretation, the examining committee may explore the student's knowledge of areas relevant to the core of the dissertation problem.

The dissertation defense may result in a decision that the candidate has 1) passed unconditionally; 2) passed conditionally with remedial work specified by the committee; 3) failed, with permission to be re-examined after a specified period; or 4) failed and dismissed from the program. The dissertation must be approved unanimously by the student's dissertation supervising committee and by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Ph.D. in Urban Planning and Public Policy

The Ph.D. Program in Urban Planning and Public Policy (UPPP) integrates the academic disciplines of urban planning and public policy, providing students with a rich core of substantive and procedural knowledge concerning policy and planning. The Program combines theoretical inquiry and analysis with application, offering students diverse approaches to policy and planning issues. Faculty interests include economic, social, environmental, transportation, land use, international, and political specializations. Students are encouraged to pursue dissertation research using either or both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and the Program offers extensive preparation in these modes of inquiry. The Program prepares Doctoral students for careers in university teaching and research, and also for senior public or non-profit sector positions.

The UPPP Ph.D. is a 48-credit hour program beyond the Master’s degree, and consists of both substantive and methodological coursework, a comprehensive exam, and a dissertation. Students take a set of seven courses (21 credit hours) that covers core knowledge and competencies in the substantive areas of planning and policy. This coursework culminates in the comprehensive exam in planning and policy. After the comprehensive exam, students take three additional courses (9 credit hours) in their area of specialization in preparation for the dissertation. In addition to coursework in planning and policy, students also take three courses (9 credit hours) in methodology, one in quantitative and a second in qualitative methods, with the option of taking additional methods courses as electives in preparation for the dissertation, and the third in theoretical foundations and research design, which is the segue course into writing the dissertation proposal. Students then take a minimum of nine dissertation hours in preparing and defending the dissertation.

Ph.D. students are admitted to begin in the Fall semester only. The application deadline is February 1 for the following Fall.

Program

The 48 credit hour program consists of 21 hours of core courses in planning and policy, 9 hours of specialized courses in planning and policy determined in consultation with the dissertation chair, 9 hours of methods including a research course intended to help students prepare their dissertation proposal, and at least 9 hours of dissertation credits (see below). After completion of their first 9 credit hours in the program, students sit for a Diagnostic Evaluation intended to assess the student's potential to successfully complete the program (see below). After completion of the 21 hours of core courses, students sit for the Comprehensive Exam intended to assess their understanding of core knowledge and competencies in planning and policy (see below). Upon successful completion of the Comprehensive Exam, students complete their remaining coursework in methods and their area of specialization as they develop their dissertation proposal.

The curriculum is summarized as follows.

Urban Planning and Public Policy Core Courses (21 hours)

URPA 5304 Urban Politics

URPA 5305 Theories of Urban Society

URPA 5306 The Urban Economy

URPA 5311 Social Policy Formation

CIRP 5300 Foundations of Urban Theory

CIRP 5303 Planning History and Theory

CIRP 5310 Introduction to Urban Structure, Policy, and Planning

Methods Courses (9 hours)

CIRP 5317 Intermediate Data Analysis (also offered as URPA 5342)

URPA 5344/CIRP 5346 Qualitative Methods (also offered as URPA 5344)

CIRP 6301 Theoretical Foundations and Ph.D. Workshop (also offered as URPA 6301) (taken as segue course into writing the dissertation proposal)

Urban Planning and Public Policy Specialization Courses (9 hours)

Students take 9 hours of courses in their elected specialized area of planning and/or policy preparing the student for the dissertation. Courses are determined in consultation with the student's dissertation supervisor and committee.

Comprehensive Examination

Students are eligible to take the Comprehensive Examination after completing all core courses. The Comprehensive Exam marks the end of core coursework and the beginning of concentrated coursework on dissertation research and preparation. The student must be enrolled in the Graduate School in the semester in which he/she takes the comprehensive exam.

The Comprehensive exam may result in: 1) unconditional pass and recommendation to proceed to the next phase of the program; 2) approval to remain in the program but a requirement to meet certain specified additional criteria; 3) failure, but with permission to retake the examination after a period specified by the examining committee; or 4) failure with recommendation not to continue in the program.

After the second failure at the Comprehensive exam, the student will be dismissed fromt he program.

Upon successful completion of the Comprehensive Exam, students complete their remaining coursework in methods and their area of specialization as they develop their dissertation proposal.

Please Note:

The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; completing course requirements in a later semester cannot change it. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of I) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded I. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an I, the student must complete the course requirements. Enrolling again in the course in which an I was earned cannot change a grade of I. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses.) The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour dissertation courses and nine-hour thesis courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either “Graded P/F/R” or “Graded R.” Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate graduate advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled “R” Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Courses (CIRP)

CIRP5191 – CONFERENCE COURSE

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Special subjects and issues as arranged by individual students and faculty members. May be repeated for credit.

 

CIRP5193 – MASTER'S COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Directed study, consultation and comprehensive examination over coursework leading to thesis substitute for MCRP degree. Required of all thesis substitute students who were admitted to the MCRP program prior to Fall 2009 and who are not enrolled in thesis or other thesis substitute courses during semester in which they plan to graduate. Students beginning the MCRP program in Fall 2009 or after may not choose the Master's Comprehensive Examination as a thesis substitute option and may not enroll in this course.

 

CIRP5197 – PROFESSIONAL REPORT

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Preparation of final professional report as a thesis substitute for MCRP degree. Required of all thesis substitute students not enrolled in CIRP 5193.

 

CIRP5297 – PROFESSIONAL REPORT

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Preparation of final professional report as a thesis substitute for MCRP degree. Required of all thesis substitute students not enrolled in CIRP 5193.

 

CIRP5300 – FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN THEORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Spatial development of human settlements, their life cycles, expansion, and decay. Covers key theories of social, spatial, and economic structures of cities, nineteenth century to present. Considers influences of urban form and development on class, race, gender, and community.

 

CIRP5303 – PLANNING HISTORY AND THEORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Various theories of planning including rational comprehensive planning, communicative action, social learning, radical planning. Sets theories within their historical contexts, and examines the social and political details of each era to show the development of diverse planning practices and theories of planning. Evaluates the values embodied in different theories and the effects of different theories on practice and social change. Should be taken in the first year of study.

 

CIRP5304 – PLAN IMPLEMENTATION, ZONING, AND REGULATIONS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to plan preparation and implementation. Topics include zoning, subdivision regulations, form-based codes, site planning, strategic planning, and comprehensive planning.

 

CIRP5305 – LAND USE, MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Assesses land use, management and development and considers new directions. Relates comprehensive planning, environmental management, and land use.

 

CIRP5306 – URBAN REVITALIZATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Examines various urban revitalization projects from coordinated, large-scale ventures to grassroots and informal neighborhood initiatives. Emphasis on the history, logic, politics, and implementation of these projects as well as their physical, social, and economic outcomes.

 

CIRP5307 – URBANIZATION IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Explores the social, political and spatial dimensions of urbanization processes in developing countries. Covers urban, social, and cultural movements as well as development, processes of urban-rural migration, and globalization. The course will cover all developing regions of the world with an emphasis on Latin American countries.

 

CIRP5308 – METROPOLITAN SUSTAINABILITY AND PLANNING ETHICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Surveys climate change and other environmental phenomena as challenges for effective, democratic planning and policy in metropolitan areas. Explores relationship of environmental sustainability to both economic vitality and social equity. Writing-intensive course with special attention to ethical dimensions of institutional responses to sustainability concerns.

 

CIRP5309 – TRANSPORTATION/LAND USE MODELING AND POLICY ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Overview of transportation/land use with specific transportation models and simulation methods; topics include economic theory of travel demand, land use models, UTPS framework for travel demand estimation, disaggregated travel demand models and abstract mode models.

 

CIRP5310 – INTRODUCTION TO URBAN STRUCTURE, POLICY AND PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Overview of spatial structure and substantive planning areas (e.g., urban design, housing, transportation, etc.); fundamentals and general information necessary for professional planners, including social, economic, and urban planning and political issues and problems; introduction to fiscal impact analysis.

 

CIRP5311 – ELEMENTS OF URBAN DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Study of contemporary urban form and environmental design, emphasizing visual-spatial qualities, social needs and economic linkages. Examination of processes, methods and techniques for solving urban design problems.

 

CIRP5312 – STRATEGIC PLANNING, POLICY AND MANAGEMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Readings and case studies of strategic planning and management in the public and non-profit sectors; application of principles to an actual situation, involving stakeholder identification, environmental scanning, and formulation of mission statements, goals, and strategies. Offered as CIRP 5312 and URPA 5357. Credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5313 – URBAN GROWTH POLICIES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Study of the political, societal and physical policies involved in urban growth management.

 

CIRP5315 – TRANSPORTATION POLICIES, PROGRAMS AND HISTORY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Transportation and related programs and policies in relation to city development and housing patterns. Interdependencies of land use, building development, and social change are explained as transportation-related.

 

CIRP5316 – LAND USE PLANNING AND THE LAW

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Explores the law of land use in the context of the American legal, economic, and political systems. Examines leading court decisions and precedents for their background, content, and applicability to contemporary land use. Offered as CIRP 5316 and URPA 5331. Credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5317 – INTERMEDIATE DATA ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An intermediate level examination of statistical and research techniques appropriate to urban and social analysis. Presuming a basic understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics, the course covers multivariate regression, including error analysis and non-linear models, path analysis, Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA), logit and probit models, and techniques for data reduction (e.g., factor analysis). Prerequisite: URPA 5302. Offered as URPA 5342 and CIRP 5317; credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5318 – TECHNIQUES OF PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to research methods, both quantitative and qualitative, and techniques of spatial analysis in urban and regional planning. Topics include interview and group techniques, decision-making methods, demographic analysis, economic base analysis, basic statistical analysis, and GIS.

 

CIRP5319 – AGENCIES OF PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Contemporary managerial functions involved in running public, private, or non-profit organizations: goal setting, planning, organizing, delegating and motivating others, personal productivity and motivation, time and stress management, controlling, and project management.

 

CIRP5320 – DATABASE MANAGEMENT FOR URBAN PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Concepts and computer applications of data management. Topics include data sources, data models, database design, data query, data analysis, and database management techniques for urban planning, management and administration. Credit will be given only once.

 

CIRP5321 – VISUAL BASIC AND GIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Provides an introduction to the techniques and applications of computer graphics and mapping for presenting socioeconomic information in graphic and spatial form.

 

CIRP5322 – ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AND POLICY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introductory seminar in subnational economic development programs in the U.S. Covers basics of location theory, economic planning, budgeting, incentives, public and private revenue sources, analysis methods such as central place and economic base, intergovernmental efforts, redevelopment, high tech, trade and/or tourism.

 

CIRP5323 – HISTORIC PRESERVATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Covers elements of historic designation, rehabilitation, financial incentives, district regulations, and preservation impacts.

 

CIRP5324 – COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Focuses on current problems of community development and neighborhood revitalization. Housing, community assets, the roles of community development corporations and social capital in cities, and community economic development will be analyzed. Federal, state, and local policies, with grassroots initiatives evaluated for effectiveness on promoting alternatives for community building and organizing. Also offered as URPA 5313; credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5325 – PHYSICAL PLANNING AND URBAN DESIGN

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to basic concepts in urban design and physical planning. Provides an understanding of how built environments evolve, and how they can be creatively planned and designed so as to meet social and ecological goals. Special attention to principles and analyses related to the physical planning of neighborhoods and streets, as well as patterns of urban form and public places.

 

CIRP5326 – CULTURAL PLANNING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course examines 1) the composition of the creative economy in cities around the world, 2) arts, culture, and creative economy planning and policy efforts at the neighborhood, city, and regional levels, and 3) the social, spatial and political ramifications of these efforts and of the creative economy broadly.

 

CIRP5327 – INTRODUCTION TO GREEN CITIES AND TRANSPORTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to concepts of green cities and transportation, environmental and transportation challenges, and school of thoughts on causes of environmental and transportation problems, with emphasis on planning practices and policies in relation to environmental and transportation issues and roles of planners in shaping urban landscape and infrastructure.

 

CIRP5328 – PUBLIC BUDGETING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course introduces students to the principles and practices used by federal, state, and local governments to acquire and spend revenues within the context of American democracy, capitalism, federalism, and economics. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with the practical skills and theoretical knowledge to enable them to be effective participants in the budgeting process and critical consumers and producers of research relevant to public budgeting. Offered as CIRP 5328 and URPA 5326. Credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5329 – PUBLIC CAPITAL BUDGETING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Examines governmental capital budgeting processes with a focus on understanding the significance of capital improvement planning, public facility investment, and project evaluation to sound infrastructure financing and regional economic growth. Governments purchase or construct long-lasting physical assets or facilities financed mostly through borrowing. This course aims to understand the rationale for public capital budgeting and debt instruments used to finance capital investment in the political context of public budgeting in America. Offered as URPA 5332 and CIRP 5329; credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5331 – GIS WORKSHOP

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Skills, practical experience, problem-solving methods and techniques in geographic information systems. Capstone course for GIS Certificate Program; substitutes for one Project Planning Course.

 

CIRP5332 – PROJECT STUDIO

0 Lecture Hours  ·  3 Lab Hours

Studio course working on applied city and regional planning projects within the Dallas-Fort Worth area or elsewhere. Provides students with practical experience in collaborative teamwork and the application of skills, methods, and techniques in city and regional planning, including citizen participation, problem analysis, mapping, design, presentation, working with clients, and applied planning process. Should be taken in the second half of the student's program of study, with exceptions for those with applied planning experience. May be repeated as topic changes.

 

CIRP5340 – GIS AND SUITABILITY ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Acquaints students with theoretical and practical aspects of suitability analysis process or activity allocation on land use/environmental policies. Uses Geographic Information System (GIS) and computer models for overlaying map analysis, buffering, market demand and activity locations, etc. to incorporate environmental and ecological factors into the determination of land development potential including soils, slope, drainage, vegetation, and related factors.

 

CIRP5341 – ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS: LAWS AND PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Federal, state, and local environmental regulations which have effect on the practice of city and regional planning. Specific articles, laws, and directives contrasted and compared to local city design and development controls. Subjects include CERCLA, RCRA, SARA, TSCA, OSH Act, among others.

 

CIRP5342 – ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Focuses on the physical environmental dimensions of urbanization including such factors as pollution, waste disposal, and land use; stresses the role of economic, social, and political institutions as these affect environmental quality of the city. Offered as CIRP 5342 and URPA 5317; credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5343 – FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Explores how environmental controversy is rooted in conflict between a number of schools of environmental policy thought with divergent perspectives on issues such as how to define progress, how to balance the needs of economy and ecosystem, how to cope with environmental complexity, and what role science should play in environment affairs. Also offered as URPA 5365; credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP5344 – HUMAN SERVICES PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Social welfare institutions: private and public; needs assessment, resource allocation, procedures, city/state/federal/private policy review; highlights of current system demands and changes. Also offered as URPA 5316.

 

CIRP5345 – PLANNING AND REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The goals, strategies, methods, and achievements of major participants in the urban land and building markets are examined. Land owners, speculators, real estate brokers, developers, bankers, lawyers, non-profit builders, and government agencies are studied, as well as such business tools as: market and feasibility analysis, appraisal techniques, proforma analysis, and others.

 

CIRP5346 – QUALITATIVE METHODS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The study of qualitative research and analysis methods. Offered as CIRP 5346 and URPA 5344; credit will be given only once.

 

CIRP5347 – URBAN PROBLEMS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Specific urban problems examined in depth, traced to their historical origins to see how they or similar problems have been dealt with in other times and places. Students will then propose possible solutions to the problems in their contemporary form. Offered as CIRP 5347 and URPA 5319.

 

CIRP5350 – ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Overview of environmental planning issues and problems, including basic ecological principles; development and effects of the chemical industry; policies on international issues; environmental justice and ethics; environmental economics, including externalities and public goods; sustainable development; overviews of planning for air quality, water quality, solid waste, pollution prevention, habitat conservation, etc.; and plan implementation, including enforcement, regulation and funding.

 

CIRP5351 – TECHNIQUES OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Analysis of impact assessment documents from a variety of projects; study of federal laws and regulations governing the process; state impact assessment laws and regulations; and procedures used in other nations. Students will prepare an environmental assessment for a real-world project. Overviews of environmental site assessment, MIS documents, and environmental auditing will also be given.

 

CIRP5352 – ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT POLICY & PRACTICE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Review and analysis of the development of the environmental assessment process with focus on expectations of how environmental assessment will be transformed in the era of climate change. Students evaluate the effects of new laws and regulations and the accelerated growth of environmental policy development at all levels of government, especially among urban areas. The course includes review of selected environmental assessment documents and project case studies.

 

CIRP5353 – ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This seminar examines the role of environmental law within the political-institutional framework of the American system. Emphasis is on the legal-judicial aspects of environmental regulation. Analyzes the decision of U.S. courts as these affect and interpret environmental laws and regulations for their legality and constitutionality.

 

CIRP5354 – HOUSING PLANNING, POLICY AND FINANCE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Evaluation of the effect of state, local, and federal housing policy on the urban arena. Topics will be selected from federal subsidy programs, tax subsidies, operations of financial intermediaries, and related areas.

 

CIRP5356 – INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Introduction to GIS and the application of computer graphics systems in the storage, processing, and retrieval of geographic urban and regional information; case examples and related projects and issues of system management.

 

CIRP5357 – INTERMEDIATE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Applications of GIS to typical urban and regional geographic information problems and projects.

 

CIRP5358 – INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (ITS) AND PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Concepts, components, deployments, and implementations of ITS; methods for ITS evaluations; linkage between ITS and traditional transportation planning; and issues related to ITS planning and deployment.

 

CIRP5360 – COMPUTER METHODS FOR TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Applications of computer software (for example, TransCad, Tranplan) in transportation planning modeling. Theories of residential location choice and travel behavior. Topics may include land-use and travel demand models, trip distribution models, mode choice models, and network equilibrium.

 

CIRP5362 – URBAN DIVERSITY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Examines the growing spatial and social diversity of cities; how physical as well as socioeconomic urban structures have fostered race, class, and gender inequalities; how urban policies have addressed and can address these issues. Offered as CIRP 5362 and URPA 5362.

 

CIRP5363 – COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Principles of and practical communication skills for planners and administrators: interpersonal communications, critical analyses, effective writing, oral presentations, creative thinking, team building, participative decision making, and conflict management.

 

CIRP5364 – ECONOMIC BASE AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT POLICY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Theories and methods of local and regional economic base analyses; techniques for inventorying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of local capital, labor and land resources; alternative policy responses to industrial development issues arising from economic base analysis.

 

CIRP5380 – RESEARCH QUESTIONS IN PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Application of research issues, writing, and communication skills in planning. Designed to assist students in preparing their research for masterAs thesis or professional report.

 

CIRP5391 – CONFERENCE COURSE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Special subjects and issues as arranged by individual students and faculty members. May be repeated for credit.

 

CIRP5395 – SPECIAL TOPICS IN PLANNING

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Selected topics in City and Regional Planning. May be repeated for credit.

 

CIRP5397 – PROFESSIONAL REPORT

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Preparation of final professional report as a thesis substitute for MCRP degree. Required of all thesis substitute students not enrolled in CIRP 5193.

 

CIRP5398 – PLANNING THESIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded F/R.

 

CIRP5698 – PLANNING THESIS

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded F/R.

 

CIRP5998 – PLANNING THESIS

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded P/F/R.

 

CIRP6301 – THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS AND PH.D. WORKSHOP

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Explores the development and function of theoretical models and frameworks. Examines the major theories from the social sciences designed for framing issues in urban planning, administration, and public policy. Designed to assist doctoral students in preparing their research for dissertation. Opportunities to present work in progress, share ideas, and interact with faculty. Prerequisite: CIRP 5317/URPA 5342, and CIRP 5346/URPA 5344. Offered as CIRP 6301 and URPA 6301; credit will be granted only once.

 

CIRP6305 – SEMINAR IN URBAN PLANNING PROCESSES

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Final course in urban planning field. Focus on the various political, economic, and social institutions and theoretical approaches in the planning process, and application of these multidisciplinary perspectives in the analysis of specific planning issues.

 

CIRP6346 – ADVANCED DATA ANALYSIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An introduction to selected advanced techniques related to planning analysis. Subjects include advanced applied regression analysis, multivariate logit analysis, and multinomial logistic regression. Applications of projection techniques, land use and transportation models, and methods of regional analysis. Offered as CIRP 6346 and URPA 6346. Credit will be given only once.

 

Courses (UPPP)

UPPP6399 – DISSERTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded R/F only.

 

UPPP6699 – DISSERTATION

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded R/F/P/W only.

 

UPPP6999 – DISSERTATION

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded P/F/R.

 

UPPP7399 – DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.