Chemistry & Biochemistry

College of Science

 

Chair Rasika Dias

 

Web www.uta.edu/chemistry/

Email chemgrad@uta.edu

Phone 817.272.3171

Fax 817.272.3808

 

219 Science Hall

Degrees / Certificates

Master’s Degrees

Chemistry, M.S.

Chemistry, M.S. Thesis Substitute

Doctoral Degrees

Chemistry, B.S. to Ph.D.

Chemistry, Ph.D.

Graduate Faculty

Professor

Daniel Armstrong

Purnendu Dasgupta

Rasika Dias

Carl Lovely

Frederick Macdonnell

Martin Pomerantz

Krishnan Rajeshwar

Zoltan Schelly

Richard Timmons

Assistant Professor

Jongyun Heo

Peter Kroll, Graduate Advisor:

Chemistry, B.S. to Ph.D.

Chemistry, M.S.

Chemistry, Ph.D.

Kevin Schug

Department Information

Courses

Objective: Master of Science

Admission Criteria

Master's Degree Requirements

Objective: Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences/Chemistry Option

Objective: Ph.D. in Chemistry

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

 

Objective: Master of Science

The objectives of the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department's program leading to the Master of Science degree include (a) developing the individual's ability to do independent research, (b) preparing students for more advanced study in chemistry and (c) providing advanced training to professional chemists and those employed in technical and business areas in which chemistry at this level is necessary for efficient performance. Research areas include analytical chemistry, biochemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, colloid and surface chemistry, electrochemistry, inorganic chemistry, medicinal chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, polymer chemistry, and theoretical chemistry.

Admission Criteria

In evaluating candidates for admission to its graduate degree programs, the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry emphasizes the preparedness of the student as evidenced by quality and quantity of coursework and the student's previous research experience. Recommendations from our own faculty, based on firsthand knowledge of the applicant or a faculty member at the applicant's institution, are also very important.

Unconditional Admission

Unconditional admission may be granted under any one of the following options. The minimum undergraduate GPA requirement for all options is 3.0, as calculated by the Graduate School.

Option 1

A satisfactory completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent, official transcripts, and GRE scores, and three letters of recommendation. An applicant whose native language is not English must submit a TOEFL score of at least 550 or a score of at least 213 on the computer-based test. The TSE-A (score of 45 or higher) can be substituted for the TOEFL.

Option 2

A satisfactory completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent, official transcripts, and a letter of recommendation from a faculty member at the applicant's undergraduate institution, plus a recommendation from a UT Arlington Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty member. An applicant whose native language is not English must submit a TOEFL score of at least 550 or a score of at least 213 on the computer-based test. A TSE-A score of 45 or higher can be substituted for the TOEFL. Those who have completed their undergraduate education in English may be eligible for a TOEFL waiver based on the recommendation letters.

Option 3

A satisfactory completion of a bachelor's degree or equivalent, official transcripts, and a letter of recommendation from a faculty member at the undergraduate institution, plus a recommendation from a UT Arlington Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty member based on a face-to-face interview. An applicant whose native language is not English must submit a TOEFL score of at least 550 or a score of at least 213 on the computer-based test. A TSE-A score of 45 or higher can be substituted for the TOEFL. Those who have completed their undergraduate education in English may be eligible for a TOEFL waiver based on the recommendation letters.

Provisional Admission

An applicant unable to supply all required documentation prior to the admission deadline but who otherwise appears to meet admission requirements may be granted provisional admission.

A deferred decision may be granted when a file is incomplete or when a denied decision is not appropriate.

Probationary Admission

In rare cases, probationary admission may be granted as the result of a substandard performance on one or more of the admission criteria. In this case, the Graduate Advisor will set additional conditions for admission including, but not limited to, additional undergraduate coursework and/or achieving a B or better in the first 9 hours of graduate coursework.

Denial of Admission

A candidate may be denied admission if they have less than satisfactory performance on a majority of the admission criteria described above.

Eligibility for Scholarships/Fellowships

Students that have no provisional admission conditions to meet will be eligible for available scholarship and/or fellowship support. Award of scholarships or fellowships will be based on the same criteria utilized in admission decisions. To be eligible, candidates must be new students coming to UT Arlington in the Fall semester, must have a GPA of 3.0 in their last 60 undergraduate credit hours plus any graduate credit hours as calculated by the Graduate School, and must be enrolled in a minimum of 6 hours of coursework in both long semesters to retain their fellowships. (Students with graduate teaching or research assistantships, however, must be enrolled in a minimum of 9 hours of coursework in both long semesters and 6 hours of coursework in the summer sessions.)

Master's Degree Requirements

A candidate for graduate study must satisfy the general admission requirements of the program.

Master's Degree with Thesis

A minimum of 18 hours in chemistry from courses listed in the Graduate Catalog will be required. Twelve of these hours should be from CHEM 5301 or 5302; 5309; 5304 or 5305 or 5307 or 5311; 5315; 5318 or 5321. Electives may be senior or graduate division courses in a science or engineering subject selected by the candidate with the approval of the graduate advisor.

Master's Degree with Thesis Substitute

Admission to the program requires approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. Minimal registration in a project course (CHEM 5391 or 5691 or CHEM 5392 or 5692) is also required. At the time the degree is awarded the candidate is expected to have completed at least five years of suitable professional experience in an industrial, government, or other chemistry laboratory.

All potential applicants must contact the Graduate Advisor prior to registration.

Master's Degree Non-Thesis

This option requires a minimum of 36 hours of coursework of which at least 24 hours must be in chemistry. All courses must be approved by the graduate advisor.

Objective: Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences/Chemistry Option

The program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in mathematical sciences/chemistry option is designed primarily to prepare chemists for research and teaching careers which involve the theoretical and mathematical aspects of chemistry. For further details, see Interdepartmental and Intercampus Programs.

Objective: Ph.D. in Chemistry

The program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Chemistry is designed primarily to prepare doctoral-level chemists for industrial research careers. The student must (1) demonstrate the ability to carry out independent research; and (2) acquire the practical knowledge of the type of research conducted in industry and of the constraints (both practical and philosophical) under which such research is conducted. The areas of research include analytical chemistry, biochemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, colloid and surface chemistry, electrochemistry, inorganic chemistry, medicinal chemistry, organic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, physical chemistry, polymer chemistry, and theoretical chemistry.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

To be admitted to the Ph.D. program, an applicant must satisfy the general admission requirements of the program and his or her academic record must show preparation for advanced work in chemistry.

Each candidate must complete the following program requirements:

  1. Courses for students emphasizing analytical chemistry (complete any 3 of the following 4 courses):

    CHEM 5304 Analytical Mass Spectrometry and Spectroscopy
    CHEM 5305 Separation Science
    CHEM 5307 Analytical Electrochemistry
    CHEM 5311 Analytical Chemistry - Concepts and Implementation

    (CHEM 5304 and 5311 are considered as Analytical Chemistry Core Courses)

    Plus any two (2) courses from two divisions outside of analytical chemistry (biochemistry, inorganic, organic, or physical). Chem 5308 cannot be used to fulfill this requirement. Students who do not have a good instrumentation background should consider taking CHEM 5461 Instrumental Analysis.

    Plus: One of the courses listed in item 7.
  2. Courses for students emphasizing biochemistry:

    CHEM 5321 Metabolism and Regulation
    CHEM 5325 Enzymology
    CHEM 5327 Biochemical Genetics

    (CHEM 5321, 5325, 5327 are considered as Biochemistry Core Courses)

    Students emphasizing biochemistry who have not had one full year of General Biochemistry must also take the following courses BEFORE taking CHEM 5321, 5325, and 5327:
    CHEM 5318 Principles of Biochemistry
    or
    CHEM 5319 General Biochemistry I
    CHEM 5320 General Biochemistry II

    Plus two from:
    CHEM 5203/5180 Quantum Chemistry
    CHEM 5309 Organic Chemistry I
    CHEM 5315 Inorganic Chemistry
    CHEM 5308 Determination of Mol. Structure by Phys. Methods
    CHEM 5304 or 5311 (one of the Analytical Core Courses)

    Plus: One of the courses listed in item 7.

  3. Courses for students emphasizing inorganic chemistry:

    CHEM 5315 Inorganic Chemistry
    CHEM 5308 Determination of Mol. Structure by Phys. Methods

    (CHEM 5315 and 5308 are considered as Inorganic Chemistry Core Courses)

    Plus two from:
    CHEM 5203/5180 Quantum Chemistry
    CHEM 5309 Organic Chemistry I
    CHEM 5304 or 5311 (one of the Analytical Core Courses)
    CHEM 5318 Principles of Biochemistry

    Plus: One of the courses listed in item 7.

  4. Courses for students emphasizing organic chemistry:

    CHEM 5308 Determination of Mol. Structure by Phys Methods
    CHEM 5309 Organic Chemistry I
    CHEM 5310 Organic Chemistry II
    CHEM 5312 Advanced Organic Synthesis

    (CHEM 5308, 5309, 5310, and 5312 are considered as Organic Chemistry Core Courses)

    Plus two from:
    CHEM 5203/5180 Quantum Chemistry
    CHEM 5304 or 5311 (one of the Analytical Core Courses)
    CHEM 5315 Inorganic Chemistry
    CHEM 5318 Principles of Biochemistry

    Plus: one of the courses listed in item 7.

  5. Courses for students emphasizing physical chemistry:

    CHEM 5301 Physical Chemistry I
    CHEM 5302 Physical Chemistry II
    CHEM 5300 Selected Topics in Advanced Chemistry

    (CHEM 5301 and 5302 are considered as Physical Chemistry Core Courses)

    Plus two from:
    CHEM 5309 Organic Chemistry I
    CHEM 5304 or 5311 (one of the Analytical Core Courses)
    CHEM 5315 Inorganic Chemistry
    CHEM 5318 Principles of Biochemistry

    Plus: One of the courses listed in item 7.

  6. Courses for students emphasizing polymer chemistry:

    All required courses for any of the other emphasis areas 1-5

    Plus:
    CHEM 5350 Advanced Polymer Chemistry

  7. CHEM 6104, 6304 or 6904. Chemistry Internship. Each student is required to spend three months in a nonacademic chemical laboratory; credit may be given for a student's previous industrial research experience.

  8. Additional research and elective courses chosen according to the student's dissertation topic and area of specialization under the guidance of the supervising committee.

A course grade may be used to satisfy degree requirements for no more than seven years after the course has been completed.

After admission to the doctoral program the student must successfully complete the appropriate examination(s) required by the faculty of the student's discipline.

A supplementary set of guidelines, published by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, should be consulted.

Please Note:

The grade of R (research in progress) is a permanent grade; completing course requirements in a later semester cannot change it. To receive credit for an R-graded course, the student must continue to enroll in the course until a passing grade is received.

An incomplete grade (the grade of I) cannot be given in a course that is graded R, nor can the grade of R be given in a course that is graded I. To receive credit for a course in which the student earned an I, the student must complete the course requirements. Enrolling again in the course in which an I was earned cannot change a grade of I. At the discretion of the instructor, a final grade can be assigned through a change of grade form.

Three-hour thesis courses and three- and six-hour dissertation courses are graded R/F/W only (except social work thesis courses.) The grade of P (required for degree completion for students enrolled in thesis or dissertation programs) can be earned only in six- or nine-hour dissertation courses and nine-hour thesis courses. In the course listings below, R-graded courses are designated either “Graded P/F/R” or “Graded R.” Occasionally, the valid grades for a course change. Students should consult the appropriate graduate advisor or instructor for valid grade information for particular courses. (See also the sections titled “R” Grade, Credit for Research, Internship, Thesis or Dissertation Courses and Incomplete Grade in this catalog.)

Courses (CHEM)

CHEM5101 – SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Two semesters of registration required of all graduate students. May not be counted for credit toward the degree requirements. Every student is expected to present one seminar to the Chemistry Department during the two-semester period. Includes learning how to prepare, present, and defend an oral presentation. Seminar topics are selected with the assistance of the instructor and may include both pure and applied chemistry. Graded P/F only.

 

CHEM5180 – QUANTUM CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

0 Lecture Hours  ·  4 Lab Hours

Molecular modeling. Application of various computational techniques to chemical problems, including determination of molecular geometry, conformational analysis, and molecular energetics. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 5203.

 

CHEM5191 – READINGS IN CHEMISTRY

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course which may be repeated for credit, with credit granted according to work performed. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5192 – RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course with laboratory with credit granted according to work performed. May be repeated for credit. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5203 – QUANTUM CHEMISTRY

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Molecular quantum mechanics. Fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, with a special emphasis on molecular electronic structure theory. Topics covered include molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and ab initio molecular orbital theory, density functional theory, calculation of thermodynamic properties and molecular dynamics. Prerequisite: CHEM 3322 or equivalent.

 

CHEM5291 – READINGS IN CHEMISTRY

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course which may be repeated for credit, with credit granted according to work performed. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5292 – RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course with laboratory with credit granted according to work performed. May be repeated for credit. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5300 – SELECTED TOPICS IN ADVANCED CHEMISTRY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The area may vary (typically analytical, applied, biological, colloid, environmental, inorganic, organic, physical, polymer, materials, theoretical, etc.) and will be announced in advance. More than one area may be covered simultaneously, in parallel courses offered under different section numbers. May be repeated for credit when area or topics vary. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5301 – PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

An introduction to the basic principles of quantum mechanics including Schrodinger and Heisenberg formulations, basic postulates, operator algebra, exact solutions of model problems, approximation methods, group theory, and spin systems. Application of quantum mechanics for spectroscopy including time dependent perturbation theory, selection rules, and a survey of electronic, ESR, NMR, rotational, and vibrational spectroscopies. Emphasis will be placed on relevance to molecular structure, chemical dynamics, and materials science.

 

CHEM5302 – PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Thermodynamics, equilibrium, and introduction to non-equilibrium systems. Kinetics of simple and complex reactions. Theories of rate processes and molecular reaction dynamics. Statistical thermodynamics and its relevance to kinetics and spectroscopy.

 

CHEM5304 – ANALYTICAL MASS SPECTROMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course covers modern aspects of atomic and molecular mass spectrometry, as well as spectrochemical analysis. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: describe the basic setup and operation of mass spectrometric and spectroscopic instrumentation; interpret spectra from various instruments as a means for qualitative and quantitative analysis; apply basic knowledge of mass spectrometry and spectroscopy for practical problem solving; relate the use of mass spectrometry and spectroscopy to his or her own research interests; and compile, present, and explain modern techniques for analytical research. Written and oral presentations, as well as traditional classroom examinations, homework, and quizzes will be used to assess student performance. Prerequisite includes CHEM 4461 or equivalent; or permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5305 – SEPARATION SCIENCE

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A comprehensive examination of most areas involving the separation of molecules and ions. Theoretical, practical and historical aspects of: distillation, sublimation, liquid-liquid extraction, sold phase extraction, chromatography, electrophoresis, field flow fractionation, membrane/barrier processes, and crystallization will be considered. Students taking this course must have a good basic background in organic chemistry and physical chemistry.

 

CHEM5306 – ANALYTICAL SPECTROSCOPY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course covers many of the methods of spectrochemical analysis used in the analytical laboratory. At the end of this course, students should be able to: explain the fundamental theory of many spectroscopy methods, including atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectroscopy, molecular luminescence, and infrared spectrometry, among others; describe basic instrumental components; apply basic statistics (e.g., measurement errors, and calibration methods) for data analysis; and understand the fundamental use and applications of spectroscopy methods for basic research and laboratory measurements. Student performance will be evaluated based on homework assignments, exams, quizzes, and presentations. Prerequisite includes CHEM 4461 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5307 – ANALYTICAL ELECTROCHEMISTRY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course covers modern aspects of electroanalytical chemistry. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: understand the concepts of redox potentials and their role in electron transfer, the thermodynamic aspects of electrochemical cells, mass transport in electrochemical systems, and the principles underlying various electroanalytical techniques such as potentiometry, amperometry, coulometry and voltammetry. The instrumental aspects of these techniques will also be addressed, including specialized approaches such as spectroelectrochemistry. The student will be able to relate the use of these analytical techniques to his or her own research needs and interests. Written and oral examinations, as well as traditional classroom examinations, will be used to assess student performance. Prerequisite includes CHEM 4461 or equivalent; or permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5308 – DETERMINATION OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE BY PHYSICAL METHODS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

The use of modern instrumental techniques to determine structure: infrared, ultraviolet, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, optical rotatory dispersion. Emphasis on interpretation of spectra. Prerequisite: CHEM 2322 or equivalent.

 

CHEM5309 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Bonding, structure, stereochemistry, substituent effects, isotope effects, solvent effects, kinetics, and linear free-energy relationships in determining reaction mechanisms. Acids and bases, orbital symmetry, pericyclic reactions, photochemistry, and nucleophilic substitution reactions. Prerequisites: CHEM 2322 and 3322 or equivalent.

 

CHEM5310 – ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A survey of organic reaction mechanisms including addition and elimination reactions, nucleophilic carbon species, carbonyl reactions, electrophilic substitution reactions, rearrangement reactions, electron deficient species, and free radical reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 5309 or permission.

 

CHEM5311 – ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY - CONCEPTS AND IMPLEMENTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course familiarizes students with basic electronic design in analytical instrumentation. Familiarization with active and passive components, operational amplifiers, timers, logic gates, and designing analytical instrumentation based on such components, especially in Wet Chemistry. The course covers ionic equilibria and acid-base equilibria and solving complex problems by iterative numerical methods and nonlinear curve fitting using programming in BASIC and MS Excel SolverTM. The course covers present day applications of wet chemical analysis, specific methods and instrumentation, practical aspects of automated liquid phase analytical methods including component availability and cost. A design problem, chosen by lottery, will be given to each student early in the semester. The newly acquired knowledge of chemistry and electronics will be used to design a new instrument and present it. Prerequisite: CHEM 4461 or equivalent undergraduate instrumental analysis course.

 

CHEM5312 – ADVANCED ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Synthetically important reactions, strategy in organic synthesis using retrosynthetic analysis and mechanistic understanding of reactions, synthons, asymmetric synthesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 5310 or permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5315 – INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Structures, bonding, and properties of main group and transition element compounds including: symmetry, coordination chemistry, reaction mechanisms, organometallic chemistry, and modern characterization techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 4318 or permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5318 – PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Protein and nucleic acids structure, enzyme kinetics, and metabolism related to the human body. The course is intended for students who require biochemistry to support research efforts, or need to satisfy a deficiency before proceeding in the biochemistry graduate program. If CHEM 5318 is used for credit toward a degree, then any of CHEM 5319, 5320, or CHEM 4311, 4312 cannot also be used for credit. Prerequisite: CHEM 2322 or equivalent. A knowledge of physical chemistry is helpful.

 

CHEM5319 – GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY I

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, enzymes. Obtaining of energy and cellular material from glucose including glycolysis, the TCA cycle, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation and the pentose phosphate pathway. Either CHEM 5318 or 5319, but not both, may be counted for credit toward degree requirements. Prerequisite: CHEM 2322 or equivalent. A knowledge of physical chemistry is helpful.

 

CHEM5320 – GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY II

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Modes of breakdown and synthesis of fats, oxidative degradation of amino acids and proteins and biosynthesis of carbohydrate, nucleic acids, and protein. Chemical significance of the genetic code. Either CHEM 5318 or 5320, but not both, may be counted for credit toward degree requirements. Prerequisite: one semester of approved biochemistry (CHEM 5319 or equivalent).

 

CHEM5321 – METABOLISM AND REGULATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Biosynthesis of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and complex lipids, including terpenes and steroids, with emphasis on regulation of these pathways. Aspects of more complex metabolic regulation by hormones, second messengers and receptor-mediated endocytosis with emphasis on chemical and structural modifications of proteins involved. Prerequisite: CHEM 5320.

 

CHEM5325 – ENZYMOLOGY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

A study of enzymes including structures, reaction mechanisms, regulation, and kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 5320.

 

CHEM5327 – BIOCHEMICAL GENETICS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Aspects of the biochemistry of gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, its regulation and control, together with genetic manipulations, and the methodology of recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisite: CHEM 5320.

 

CHEM5333 – THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Applications of thermodynamics to the study of materials, thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid solutions and their relationship to surface and crystalline defects. Also offered as MSE 5320. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5350 – ADVANCED POLYMER CHEMISTRY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Polymer synthesis and reactions including condensation, free-radical, ionic, and coordination polymerizations; principles of polymerization including thermodynamics and kinetic considerations; physical characterizations including determinations of absolute molecular weights, relative molecular weights, morphology, glass transitions, and polymer crystallinity; relationships between macromolecular structure, properties, and uses of polymeric materials. Also offered as MSE 5346. Prerequisite: CHEM 2321 and 2322 or permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5391 – READINGS IN CHEMISTRY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course which may be repeated for credit, with credit granted according to work performed. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5392 – RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course with laboratory with credit granted according to work performed. May be repeated for credit. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5398 – THESIS

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5461 – ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTATION

2 Lecture Hours  ·  8 Lab Hours

Theory of instrumentation and chemical signal source. Practical experiments utilizing atomic and molecular absorption and emission spectroscopy, chromatographic analysis, and electrochemical techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 3322 or equivalent.

 

CHEM5491 – READINGS IN CHEMISTRY

4 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course which may be repeated for credit, with credit granted according to work performed. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5492 – RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY

4 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course with laboratory with credit granted according to work performed. May be repeated for credit. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5591 – READINGS IN CHEMISTRY

5 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course which may be repeated for credit, with credit granted according to work performed. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5592 – RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY

5 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course with laboratory with credit granted according to work performed. May be repeated for credit. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5691 – READINGS IN CHEMISTRY

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course which may be repeated for credit, with credit granted according to work performed. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5692 – RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Conference course with laboratory with credit granted according to work performed. May be repeated for credit. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5698 – THESIS

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM5998 – THESIS

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM6100 – TOPICS IN GRADUATE RESEARCH

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Lectures by departmental and university faculty on current chemical research at U.T. Arlington. All graduate students are required to take this course once. May not be counted toward degree requirements. Graded P/F only.

 

CHEM6102 – ISSUES IN MODERN CHEMICAL RESEARCH

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Topics to be discussed include the use of the library, maintenance of a research notebook, ethics in research, aspects of technical writing and presentations, and how research is funded. May not be counted toward degree requirements. Graded P/F only.

 

CHEM6104 – CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP

1 Lecture Hour  ·  0 Lab Hours

Each student is required to spend three months in a nonacademic chemical laboratory; credit may be given for a student's previous industrial research experience. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of Graduate Advisor.

 

CHEM6202 – PRINCIPLES OF INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Survey of industrial inorganic and organic chemical processes. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

CHEM6203 – REGULATORY ASPECTS OF THE CHEMICAL INDUSTRY

2 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Survey of chemical toxicology, regulatory aspects involved in the chemical industry, industrial safety, patents and patent law.

 

CHEM6304 – CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Each student is required to spend three months in a nonacademic chemical laboratory; credit may be given for a student's previous industrial research experience. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of Graduate Advisor.

 

CHEM6399 – DISSERTATION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded R/F only. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the degree of Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry.

 

CHEM6699 – DISSERTATION

6 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded R/F/P/W. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the degree of Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry.

 

CHEM6904 – CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Each student is required to spend three months in a nonacademic chemical laboratory; credit may be given for a student's previous industrial research experience. Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: permission of Graduate Advisor.

 

CHEM6999 – DISSERTATION

9 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

Graded P/F/R only. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for the degree of Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry.

 

CHEM7399 – DOCTORAL DEGREE COMPLETION

3 Lecture Hours  ·  0 Lab Hours

This course may be taken during the semester in which a student expects to complete all requirements for the doctoral degree and graduate. Enrolling in this course meets minimum enrollment requirements for graduation, for holding fellowships awarded by The Office of Graduate Studies and for full-time GTA or GRA positions. Students should verify that enrollment in this course meets other applicable enrollment requirements. To remain eligible in their final semester of study for grants, loans or other forms of financial aid administered by the Financial Aid Office must enroll in a minimum of 5 hours as required by the Office of Financial Aid. Other funding sources may also require more than 3-hours of enrollment. Additional hours may also be required to meet to requirements set by immigration law or by the policies of the student's degree program. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office, other sources of funding, Office of International Education and/or their graduate advisor to verify enrollment requirements before registering for this course. This course may only be taken once and may not be repeated. Students who do not complete all graduation requirements while enrolled in this course must enroll in a minimum of 6 dissertation hours (6699 or 6999) in their graduation term. Graded P/F/R.